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The Zoya Factor Paperback – 27 Feb 2009

4.0 out of 5 stars 8 customer reviews

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Paperback, 27 Feb 2009
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Product details

  • Paperback: 520 pages
  • Publisher: HarperCollins India (27 Feb. 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 8172238177
  • ISBN-13: 978-8172238179
  • Product Dimensions: 19.4 x 13 x 2.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 2,560,321 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

About the Author

The author was born and schooled in Meerut in 1970. She worked in advertising for over 14 years, and has created many ad campaigns. --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.


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Customer Reviews

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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
The Zoya Factor is exuberant, funny, full of Indian English and Hindi slang, and I adored it. The romance subplot is not very surprising, but the cricket thread is knowledgable and interesting, especially the Indian cricket fans contrasted with Australian "cricket fever". Zoya herself is sweet and friendly and magnificently self-sabotaging at times. She's not perfect but she is likeable.

There is a large cast of distinctive supporting characters, some of whom get the funniest lines. Never once do I get that "who is this again?" feeling, which I have with certain other books with a much smaller cast.

The Indian slang and bits of Hindi are a bit surprising at first, but I found almost everything made sense in context and I've had more difficulty getting used to the English of Jane Austen, or some of Georgette Heyer's more strictly historical novels. I didn't find it much of a barrier and once I was sucked into the story I stayed there to the end. This is a great read and very enjoyable.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
It took a little while to get into this book, but once I did I really enjoyed it. Although published in English, there were a lot of Indian expressions and phrases in here that I didn't understand and couldn't help feeling it would have helped if I had. Harper Collins, if you're reading, some footnotes might have been useful.

I love cricket and enjoyed reading about it from another woman's perspective. However, I wonder if the author ever intended for this book to be read outside of India? She occasionally has her heroine express her fear of being surrounded by "white people" during her trip to Australia. This took me by surprise, as the rationale for her fear is never explained.

This aside, it follows the traditional chick lit path with the heroine over analysing the actions of the hero and almost ruining their chances of happiness. But it provides a wonderful insight into India's culture, their obsession with cricket and is generally a good fun read.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Its good to read this refreshing book from an Indian author. Of course there are words which would be probably best understood if you understood some Hindi but all in all a quick light hearted fun read :) Good to gift as well!
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Format: Paperback
The book starts off with a conversation between two chicks (yes, it's a chick-lit) in a lingo that is a delectable mash of Hindi-English, much like Amitav Ghosh in Sea of Poppies, but more modern, more with-it. If you don't comprehend Hindi, this book may be a complete waste of time unless you doggedly managed to enjoy the movie Three Idiots. If you do comprehend Hindi, this book is a complete waste of time, but unbelievably fulfilling if you love wasting time.

I read a few pages and thought to myself, it's funny alright, but not classy; far from it. Chubby Zoya destined to fall in love with the most handsome captain of the Indian cricket team, of all times. I thought the Bridget Jones love story was passé. It has trended out even by the time the sequel was released. I tch-tched through the first few chapters, very mindful of how trashy and Shoba De-ish the style was (having never read a Shobha De, don't ask me how I manage to be so opinionated).

Half way through the novel, something strange began to happen. I felt that this novel was threatening to draw me into the plot, despite my staunch views about elite fiction, et al. The plot? A convoluted mass of jiggery-pokery - Zoya, quite by accident, is turned into the durga goddess of cricket, holding supreme power over a game she barely understands - but I don't mind that, you see, I worship Salman Rushdie.

I was beginning to laugh, not just snigger. Even so, I was still deliberately resisting warming up to the novel. By now I had proclaimed to my mum, during our weekly catch-up, that how ridiculous it was of me to be reading a book like the Zoya-factor, right after finishing off with my series of Man Booker Prize Nominees (no, I don't have a book club. I have no excuse. Period).
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