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Young, Restless, No Longer Reformed: Black Holes, Love, and a Journey In and Out of Calvinism by [Fischer, Austin]
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Young, Restless, No Longer Reformed: Black Holes, Love, and a Journey In and Out of Calvinism Kindle Edition

4.3 out of 5 stars 6 customer reviews

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Length: 132 pages Word Wise: Enabled

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Product Description

About the Author

Austin Fischer is Teaching Pastor at Vista Community Church. He and his wife, Allison, live in Temple, Texas. He speaks and writes and you can follow him on Twitter @austintfischer or online at purpletheology.com.

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 307 KB
  • Print Length: 132 pages
  • Page Numbers Source ISBN: 1625641516
  • Publisher: Cascade Books, an Imprint of Wipf and Stock Publishers (12 Jan. 2014)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00I3NULM8
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Not Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars 6 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #353,230 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This well thought out meandering through theology is a reliable document that will not lead you into a quagmire of unbelief but rather help you assess your own journey and the God you serve.

Fischer bases much of this volume on his own experience, but he brings out the big guns in various places, in particular his dealings with Romans 9. His argument is basically that Calvinism doesn't hold water, but rather forces the believer through ever more difficult mental gymnastics until their own belief system is very, very suspect.

This book doesn't rubbish anyone's beliefs, doesn't tell us to hate anyone, doesn't tell you which church to go to, but it does let you know that you don't have to be brain-dead to be a Christian.

A generously non-academic treatise that answers many of the questions you were asking, but that has academic backing where necessary. This is a worthwhile read and a good investment for your bookshelf.
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Format: Paperback
I really enjoyed this book. It's well written, thoughtful, respectful, insightful and intelligent. Austin writes of his own journey which is engaging and along the way he explains Calvinism and Free Will Theism well. I recommend this book wholeheartedly. It's timely and I believe necessary - I too had a similar journey...
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I suspect that we will increasingly find more former neo-Calvinists like Austin Fischer, who have come to abandon it as a system because they can no longer accept that God creates people and ordains their sin (or is it the other way around; some bright spark 'Supra' will no doubt set me straight?) that he might damn them for their sins and for his greater glory. Tough gig that, especially when you actually think it through as opposed to merely cauterizing your emotions. Any Calvinist who can read his chapter, "The Girl in the Red Jacket", unmoved and unshaken has already allowed his theology to have a dehumanizing effect. I just hope that we don't get the standard (smug) responses that Fischer "doesn't understand" Calvinism, or that he's set up a "straw man" - a dreaded expression used frequently by pseudo-intellectuals on threads like these.

That said, free will theism doesn't cut it for me either. This is Fischer's newly adopted position, and presumably alleviates the problem by emphasizing that those who end up in hell choose it for themselves. Many free will theists still don't like the idea of eternal conscious torment (who can blame them?), and find annihilationism to be a better option - e.g. Clark Pinnock and Greg Boyd. They can't commit to universal reconciliation precisely because of their appeal to the free will of human beings to either choose or reject God. Fischer is right to point out that all theological systems have their problem areas in his chapter, "Monsters in the Basement", but personally I find universal reconciliation to be the most satisfying of the biblically viable options when it comes to understanding hell. Unfortunately, Fischer (like many others) dismisses it too quickly in a passing reference in the book.
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