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Young Bond: Blood Fever Paperback – 5 Apr 2012

4.4 out of 5 stars 98 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Paperback: 400 pages
  • Publisher: Puffin (5 April 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0141343389
  • ISBN-13: 978-0141343389
  • Product Dimensions: 12.9 x 2.5 x 19.7 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (98 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 3,063 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

Charlie Higson's Young Bond books get an A* (GQ)

This is writing for children of the highest order (Spectator)

About the Author

Charlie Higson is a well-known writer of screenplays and adult thriller novels. He's also a performer and co-creator of The Fast Show. He has written five mega-selling novels about Young Bond - Silverfin, Blood Fever, Double or Die, Hurricane Gold and By Royal Command, as well as Danger Society: The Young Bond Dossier and best-selling teen thrillers The Enemy and The Dead.


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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
For this old 007 fan, Charlie Higson's first Young Bond novel, SilverFin, was a mixed bag. Clearly a book written for a preteen target audience, it too often seemed to mimic a Harry Potter adventure. I'm happy to report this is NOT the case with Young Bond Book 2: Blood Fever, which takes a confident quantum leap into maturity and gives Bond fans of all ages one of the very best James Bond novels yet written.
The key difference seems to be that SilverFin was written as a children's book (which could still be enjoyed by adults), while Blood Fever appears to have been written with a more adult readership in mind. This is a tougher, darker, much more violent book than SilverFin. It even includes a classic Bondian torture scene (but don't panic, parents, the torture is more about endurance than person-to-person sadism). But because Blood Fever chronicles the adventures of a 14 year old, it's still very much a novel young readers will find thrilling--even dangerous. This one may need to be smuggled beneath the sheets and read by flashlight--which is precisely where a James Bond book SHOULD be read. Ian Fleming would be proud.
The villain in Blood Fever, Count Ugo Carnifex, is a true Bond baddie in the most classic sense, with a lair and scheme reflecting every inch of his megalomania. This is the best drawn Bond villain, book or film, we've encountered in some time. Secondary characters are also marvelously conceived, but it's the character of young Bond who stands head and shoulders above all others. The timid, apologetic youngster of SilverFin is long gone. Here, we have a teenage James with all the skills and swagger of Ian Fleming's secret agent.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
My 10 yo son is reading this, he's enjoying it. It's a much better book than Silverfin (which I thought was rubbish). I do think Higson tends to choose some rubbish names for his characters (...apart from James Bond obviously...) but that's just personal taste. Too many Latin / foreign words which ruin the flow of the reading and are nearly always unnecessary to the story. With a few tweaks could be a lot better.
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Format: Paperback
For this old 007 fan, Charlie Higson's first Young Bond novel, SilverFin, was a mixed bag. Clearly a book written for a preteen target audience, it too often seemed to mimic a Harry Potter adventure. I'm happy to report this is NOT the case with Young Bond Book 2: Blood Fever, which takes a confident quantum leap into maturity and gives Bond fans of all ages one of the very best James Bond novels yet written.
The key difference seems to be that SilverFin was written as a children's book (which could still be enjoyed by adults), while Blood Fever appears to have been written with a more mature (even adult) readership in mind. This is a tougher, darker, much more violent book than SilverFin. It even includes a classic Bondian torture scene (but don't panic parents, the torture is more about endurance than person-to-person sadism). But because Blood Fever chronicles the adventures of a 14 year old, it's still very much a novel young readers will find thrilling--even dangerous. This one may need to be smuggled beneath the sheets and read by flashlight--which is precisely where a James Bond book SHOULD be read. Ian Fleming would be proud.
The villain in Blood Fever, Count Ugo Carnifex, is a true Bond baddie in the most classic sense, with a lair and scheme reflecting every inch of his megalomania. This is the best drawn Bond villain, book or film, we've encountered in some time. Secondary characters are also marvelously conceived, but it's the character of young Bond who stands head and shoulders above all others. The timid, apologetic youngster of SilverFin is long gone. Here, we have a teenage James with all the skills and swagger of Ian Fleming's secret agent.
Read more ›
Comment 14 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
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Format: Paperback
This adventure novel is centred on an inquisitive boy named James Bond. James Bond the adult, as we know him, is the most famous spy the world has ever seen, but Charlie Higson, tries in this book to paint a picture of the young Bond's life in the 1930's.

James is portrayed as a curious, interested, strong and friendly boy. This book, Blood Fever, is the sequel to SilverFin, in which the young James was trapped in a deadly eel pond. This latest book was much more intriguing and satisfying than the last. The plot is subtly interwoven with clues to the ending - but Charlie Higson manages through skilful writing not to give anything away too early.

The story starts in Eton, when James is almost caught red-handed as a member of a society which has been banned by the school. The society is based around danger, and dangerous situations, and this becomes a recurring theme throughout the book. Soon after, the story moves on to the island of Sardinia, where the pace of the book really starts to pick up.

James is on a school trip to the small island with a friendly teacher, but meets up with his uncle, who owns a villa there. James starts learning about the Millenaria, a sinister society whose members are desperate for Latin to become a universal language. The Millenaria play a huge part in this mystery novel, and they are a fascinating and dangerous group, whose ultimate aim is to rule the world, and who are willing to take whatever measures are necessary to achieve it - including killing anybody who obstructs them.

James now finds himself at a huge Roman palazzo. The palazzo of a man named Count Ugo Carnifex. Carnifex is the head of the Millenaria and, one night, James hears him talking about rebuilding the Roman Empire.
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