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York Notes for KS3 Shakespeare: The Tempest (York Notes Key Stage 3) Paperback – 1 Mar 2007

4.5 out of 5 stars 40 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Paperback: 80 pages
  • Publisher: Longman (1 Mar. 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1405856475
  • ISBN-13: 978-1405856478
  • Product Dimensions: 14.8 x 0.5 x 21 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (40 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 505,061 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

"Oscar Grillo cannot draw a line without it spitting and spiraling into a storm of expressive features and skittering bodies. He IS a tempest, and this adaptation captures the energy and fury of a Globe first-night performance back in the day." Dave McKean, filmmaker and artist" --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

About the Author

Oscar Grillo is a professional animation director and illustrator. He was awarded thePalme d'Orfor his work on the film "Seaside Women" and contributed to the movie "Monsters, Inc." " --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.


Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
I keep finding myself writing this at the moment: this is a wonderful work, but do think twice before buying this edition of the play, as if you need something to study, you'll be left rather high and dry here.

The other reviewer on this page has some trouble getting their head around why people get so excited about "The Tempest", and cannot see a clear "story" as in "Romeo and Juliet". But then, that's partly the point: that is an early play, sticking closely to its models and offering relatively little to doubt or to trouble the viewer. "The Tempest" may or may not be Shakespeare's last play (it seems to be the last play he wrote alone; he did collaborate on some other plays), but it is certainly a late work, written at a time when he was so well versed in what the theatre could do, and in the dramatic forms it had to offer, he seems almost to have pushed the boundaries of drama to their absolute limits. One sees here, three plots (at least) running simultaneously, with one central character, each one exploring different issues, and each one employing different dramatic methods. If one were to want an overview of the theatre in England at the beginning of the sixteenth century, one could do a lot worse than starting here.

"The Tempest" may be an odd play as far as its narrative goes, but it is wonderful in its poetry. It contains many glorious passages, sometimes coming from the mouths of the most unlikely characters, and for that reason it is worth reading.

The only reason I've not awarded this book five stars, though, is because this edition is not suited to all readers. Many students will find this very frustrating because there are next to no explanatory notes, and the provision of glosses is niggardly. If you're studying the play in any depth, you may well find a Cambridge, Arden or Oxford edition suits you better. If you want a chance to read the play in a cheap, disposable edition, this will do you well.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
The York Notes Advanced are helpful if you're struggling to understand the behaviour of some of Shakespeare's characters or the meaning behind certain references. These notes, along with David and Ben Crystal's 'Shakespeare's Words', really opened the play up for me.
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By EA Solinas HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWER on 5 Jun. 2010
Format: Paperback
Many consider "The Tempest" to be the final play that Shakespeare wrote solo, which gives a certain bittersweet flavor to its story -- especially since the main character is a sorcerer who manipulates others to get the ending he desires. Shakespeare juggled a trio of main stories before tying them off in rare style, but it's Prospero and his final speech that are truly intriguing.

For many years, the exiled Duke of Milan Prospero has lived on a remote island with his young daughter Miranda. But when he discovers that his treacherous brother Antonio and his similarly treacherous friends are nearby on a sailing ship, he summons a storm that causes the ship to crash on the island.

And like a puppet-master, Prospero arranges this as he wants -- he sends his servant Ariel to haunt the men who betrayed him, he thwarts the machinations of his evil servant Caliban, and he pretends to treat Alonso's son Ferdinand badly while secretly matchmaking him with Miranda. In the end, everything will be as he desired.

"The Tempest" is a play with two different dimensions. On one hand, we have a simple story about a mage whose power allows him to manipulate everything in his little domain. And on the other, we have the story of a brilliant storyteller who arranges his own little worlds as he sees fit, and bids farewell to his role ("Now my charms are all o'erthrown/And what strength I have's mine own...")

And appreciated on its own, "The Tempest" is a brilliant play -- Shakespeare juggled the three main plotlines nicely, and brought a solid sense of resolution to the story. His rich dialogue is stunning ("But doth suffer a sea-change/Into something rich and strange/Sea-nymphs hourly ring his knell..."), especially during Ariel's songs and Prospero's speeches.
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Format: Paperback
This is a great graphic version of The Tempest, which really brings the words to life. Reading Shakespeare can be tough, particularly for beginners, and it's easy to forget that what you are reading is really meant to be seen - this is an interesting way to approach the play. This version is unabridged, which is great, and Oscar Grillo's drawings are fantastic - very atmospheric.
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Format: Paperback
A relatively quick and straightforward read but in no way as enjoyable as seeing professionals act it out. Unless you want or need to study the text in detail, or desire to brag that you have read it, then I suggest waiting until it comes round to your local theatre or getting a DVD version.

I've seen many productions of The Tempest but this is the first time I have read the text. It's surprisingly readable with the characters and plot being neatly set out in the dramatic opening storm scene and then after in Prospero's cave. Briefly, Prospero is a magician marooned on an enchanted island with his daughter Miranda and served by Ariel, a spirit and Caliban a monsterous son of a witch. The storm throws Prospero's Brother Antonio and a party of friends onto the island and Prospero seeks his revenge on them for usurping his kingdom of Milan and setting him and Miranda adrift on the ocean years before.

Essentially there are three threads to the play. Prospero's revenge and reconciliation with Antonio, Miranda falling in love with Ferdinand, the son of the King of Naples, and the story of Ariel and Caliban and their relationship with Prospero. Between these three Shakespeare can explore a wide range of human experiences. He throws in a bit of comedy too as the wicked Caliban gets drunk with some of Antonio's men and enlists them against Prospero.

Just occasionally the action gets a bit confusing about who is doing what to whom whereas I've never had that problem in a staged version. So that, whilst this is interesting to read, a first class staged performance is so much more enjoyable for a casual Shakespeare reader. If you want to deconstruct the text stanza by stanza then of course you need to work through it on paper.
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