FREE Delivery in the UK.
Only 1 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
Yiddish Civilisation: The... has been added to your Basket
FREE Delivery on orders over £10.
Used: Very Good | Details
Sold by the book house
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: This item will be picked, packed and shipped by Amazon and is eligible for free delivery within the UK
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Yiddish Civilisation: The Rise and Fall of a Forgotten Nation Paperback – 1 Jun 2006

4.6 out of 5 stars 12 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
£12.99
£5.84 £2.56
Note: This item is eligible for click and collect. Details
Pick up your parcel at a time and place that suits you.
  • Choose from over 13,000 locations across the UK
  • Prime members get unlimited deliveries at no additional cost
How to order to an Amazon Pickup Location?
  1. Find your preferred location and add it to your address book
  2. Dispatch to this address when you check out
Learn more
£12.99 FREE Delivery in the UK. Only 1 left in stock (more on the way). Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
click to open popover

Special Offers and Product Promotions


Frequently Bought Together

  • Yiddish Civilisation: The Rise and Fall of a Forgotten Nation
  • +
  • The Story of the Jews: Finding the Words (1000 BCE - 1492)
Total price: £23.67
Buy the selected items together

Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.




Product details

  • Paperback: 368 pages
  • Publisher: W&N; New Ed edition (1 Jun. 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0753819031
  • ISBN-13: 978-0753819036
  • Product Dimensions: 13 x 2.4 x 19.7 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (12 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 451,498 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

"A highly enjoyable and surprisingly positive account of how Jewish culture helped shape European history and vice versa." -"The Sunday Telegraph"
"An outstanding survey. . . . Kriwaczek tracks the origins, flowering, and destruction of this unique, vibrant, and tenacious culture with a fine mixture of pride, regret, and eloquence." -"Booklist"
"Evocative and precise. . . . An enjoyable narrative that captures the intricacies of a very complicated history."-"Publishers Weekly"
"Informative and very entertaining . . . conjures up and re-creates baroque images and marvelous set pieces of feverish activity, long lost towns and shtetls [as well as] wonderful pictures of lost communities of Jews."-"The Irish Times"

Book Description

A portrait of a civilisation which flourished within living memory and left an indelible mark on history

See all Product Description

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
Paul Kriwaczek turned to history after having been for many years a television program producer, and there is a strong journalistic and pictorial flavour about this book. This makes it very readable and enjoyable. There are many personal touches in it; quite a lot of interesting information about matters that are not strictly germane to his subject; and a number of intriguing and illuminating comparisons between the distant past and more recent periods.
The first third of the book is not really about Yiddish Civilization at all, dealing as it does with the history of the Jews from the time of the Diaspora to the medieval period when something like a Yiddish identity emerged among the Ashkenazi Jews. In his Bibliography he comments that general books on the history of the Jews are "disappointing in their lack of attention to eastern Europe during the earlier medieval period", and it is this first third of the book that I found most original and that advances a number of theories which challenge commonly received ideas about Jewish history.
The first is that Kriwaczek has the first Jews arriving in Eastern Europe not from the West, but from the East, being swept westwards from the northern edges of the Byzantine Empire by wave after wave of nomadic tribes, generically known as Scythians; and Kriwaczek says that the word Ashkenazi is actually derived from the Semitic name for the Scythians, a-Shkuz. (The problem seems to me that these nomadic waves belong to a period that had ended before the 7th century.) So there were already many Slavic Jews living in Poland, Bohemia and Austria before the arrival of Jews there from Germany.
Read more ›
Comment 34 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I'm surprised that I learned as much as I did from this. Really enjoyable, hooks you in from the first page, just wonderful. Slightly pessimistic implications on non-territorial nations...I wonder if the decline of Yiddish civilisation is a one-off because the Jews migrated from the Heym before the age of the internet and satellite TV? Will future groups of immigrants sustain their culture more easily/successfully?
Comment 7 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
wonderful and fascinating book and story about a fundamental and important part of European civilization - that has too little been ignored and underestimated. It puts a lie to a lot of the nonsense that Jewish culture and civilization are alien to Europe - when in fact it is ancient, deep and profound but also to the myth that the Jews are a pure unmixed people - when in fact there was a huge amount of conversion into Judaism - throughout history are that the Jewish are as much an integral part of European history and identity as any other group in Europe that stretches back and through the Roman empire and spread with ancient Greek trade routes. Found it very interesting that the Jews spread with the Germanic people as they moved into what were Slavic areas that are now todays Baveria and Austria -and Regensberg - near Munich is seen as the site of the birth of the Yiddish language! But not dry "old" history -but takes it right up the the daily gauntlet of a Jewish school boy trying to get to school without being hijacked to attend morning synagogue service numbers - being caught out by suddenly being confronted in Yiddish,as they were day dreaming as all school kids on the way to school, to see if they were Jewish and so could not escape! :-)
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I would say that I found this book interesting, rather than that it held me spellbound. There's a wealth of detail that might be more captivating to a Jewish readership wanting to know more about its heritage than for a general readership, and I found myself fast-forwarding through the pages at times. It was however interesting to learn that the Jewish diaspora started long before the destruction of the Temple and that this had a simple and healthy economic motivation, rather than being the result of Jews being driven from their homeland by a cruel oppressor; and that the large majority, already millions of Jews, were living contentedly all across the Roman Empire long before that happened.

But the wealth of detailed information on places and people that make up Yiddish history may mean much more to Jewish readers than to others. It has the result of this book not really being 'popular history' for a general readership. But the seriously interested in Yiddish history will find a lot of useful information here
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
Paul Kriwaczek has a background as a TV producer, and this book would lend itself well to a series of TV programmes visiting the locations he covers, and talking about the characters and situations he discusses.This is the first book I have ever read about the Yiddish nation,and I have welcomed an entirely new (to me) perspective on European history, and one that should be far better appreciated and more widely known. It is a classic example of History having been written by the victors, so that the Yiddish civilisation has almost been 'written out' of much conventional historical writing.
Having picked up the book with pleasurable anticipation, I was initially disappointed in it, once I had passed the introductory pages about the author's London boyhood.
The book's weaknesses are particularly prevalent in the earlier chapters when the text seems to be entirely derivative from a range of published histories. It is unfortunate too that the referencing is so general, and no pagination is normally given. There are too many unremarkable passages quoted from historians, in a way that is distracting to the reader, and gives the impression of the author knitting together a narrative about which he lacks much confidence.
Later chapters work better, when he is dealing with interesting religious and political movements both within and outside of Judaism and with ground breaking (but in many cases little known) Jewish individuals in the post Reformation period.I believe that he has written the book with a sharp eye on the American market, and indeed, much that he has to say throws most interesting light on New York Jewish history.
Read more ›
Comment 4 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse


Feedback