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The Yellow Wallpaper by [Gilman, Charlotte Perkins]
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The Yellow Wallpaper Kindle Edition

4.3 out of 5 stars 182 customer reviews

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Length: 27 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
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Product Description

Book Description

First published in 1892, this perfect novel portrays with chilling power the powerlessness of women within Victorian marriage.

Synopsis

Tells the story of a nameless woman driven mad by enforced confinement after the birth of her child. Forced to live in an attic where the walls are covered in a sickly yellow wallpaper, she does what she has to do, she writes. Slowly but surely the tortuous pattern of the paper weaves itself into her mind. From the author of HERLAND.

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 68 KB
  • Print Length: 27 pages
  • Simultaneous Device Usage: Unlimited
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B0082UPBWC
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
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  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars 182 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #1,377 Free in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Free in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I first read this story whilst at University studying Literature and came across it again as a friend (similarly studying) said that she had been reading it and enjoyed it. It was free on Kindle so I downloaded it to read it again. I'm so glad I did. This is a brilliant study of a woman slowly losing her mind. We first encounter the female lead as a woman who is "ill" in some mysterious way, although her doctor husband doesn't really think there's anything all that much wrong with her (sounds like one of the doctors at my surgery! He must have been employed in the NHS!) Through the story we discover she's just had a baby but doesn't seem to be able to bear the child near her. Next we find that she's living in an attic room which used to be a children's nursery - or did it? The gnawed bed, torn wallpaper, barred windows and "fixtures" like rings to the wall strike the reader as immediately odd. Children's nursery? Gymnasium? Or padded cell for the keeping of the insane? Insanity is the clear theme in the story as the narrator identifies and then identifies too closely with a mysterious woman who appears to be caged behind the bars of the yellow wallpaper of the room.

It's a fabulous story with the woman's progression into insanity clearly charted through the story, and yet it is subtly done. I remember when we studied it at University there was talk of yellow wallpaper being tinted with lead in the late nineteenth century which might have led to the woman's insanity. They also used to colour it with urine too, which smelled as the woman describes in the story - but did not, as far as I know, lead to insanity. Or it could have just been a simple case of post-natal depression. Whatever your interpretation, this is a fabulous story and very easy to read.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Charlotte Perkins Gilman provides a stunning and disturbing account of a woman's decline in madness. Margaret Atwood comments in the Blind Assassin that life is little more than a period of waiting interspersed with a few significant moments. For the nameless women in The Yellow Wallpaper, this is one of those moments. Over a three month period we see in acute and distressingly real detail how her inability to match her identity with the role of submissive wife that late Victorian society demanded leads to a steady, inexorable descent from sagacity to despair. Suffering from some unnamed illness - which modern readers might relate to post-natal depression, she is confined to a room for rest and sleep. Unable to find any outlet for emotion or intellect, she becomes obsessed with the room's wallpaper - its complex and endless pattern of pointless swirls. At first she just dislikes it, then hatred bordering on fear follows, to be usurped by a semi-dependent fascination and ultimately total identity: she becomes, not so much the wallpaper, but the embodiment of the creeping women who dwell, reluctantly, behind the pattern.

It is a picture of personal despair, of desperate attempts to retain sanity and ultimately of failure. On one level it's a chilling horror tale reminiscent of Edgar Allan Poe. On another it is a clinically precise picture of a mental aberration. But it is more than that. A powerful indictment of the institution of marriage, of the social mores and misguided kindliness of late Victorian middle-class America, and of the treatment of women, Gilman's story is as timeless as it is authentic.
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Format: Paperback
Firstly, to the story itself. The narrative voice is a repressed woman of the late 19th century, locked in a room with horrid yellow wallpaper, expected by her husband to recover from a mysterious sickness. The more time she spends in this prison, desperate to write, the more disturbed she becomes, until she begins to see a woman crawling within the wallpaper. This is both a study of psychology and a look into the position of women of the period.
The style of the story is wonderfully haunting. The narrative is sparse and exclamatory. This publication has printed the lettering large so that the paragaphs are fairly spread out. The result is that the story appears like a long poem. It is easily read in half an hour or so.
I was very grateful for the very informative Afterword, which is actually longer than the story. It offers a background of the author and links her to other similar authors, as well as explaining the situation of the woman in the story. Without the Afterword, I think I would have been left chilled, but uninformed.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
The work itself is wonderful. Reading like a cross between Poe and du Maurier, I would recommend it to anyone with a taste in gothic literature. However, this edition sucks. There's some formatting issues that really ruin your immersion in the tale. I did feel that the price was fair considering the length of the text, but I regret not spending a couple of quid more on an edition that presumably would have been proofread before publishing.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
THE YELLOW WALLPAPER a well written study of a woman driven into insanity by her domineering husband and the patriarchal society of the time. A short story contained within 17 pages and yet the writer has encapsulated more in this short story than some authors manage in a whole novel.
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