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The Year's Best Science Fiction: Twenty-Third Annual Collection Hardcover – 11 Jul 2006

2.0 out of 5 stars 1 customer review

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Product details

  • Hardcover: 660 pages
  • Publisher: St. Martin's Press (11 July 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0312353359
  • ISBN-13: 978-0312353353
  • Product Dimensions: 16.2 x 5.3 x 24.2 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 2.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 6,666,083 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
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Review

Praise for" The Year' s Best Science Fiction Twenty-second Annual Collection"

" Hugo winner Dozois shows off the dazzling range of the genre in his annual compendium.... The range of stories indicates that SF still doesn' t know the meaning of the word" boundaries.""
"---Publishers Weekly "(starred review)

" The most prestigious of the several best-of-the-year fantasy and SF anthologies never fails to enchant and to showcase SF' s leading edge. In it, high-quality contributions by a generous cross section of veterans, rising stars, and newcomers---twenty-nine authors in all---constitute a balanced mixture of ideas and voices."
"---Booklist"

" Huge multiplicity of first-rate fiction...Is the polished platter underlying a huge layer cake of exquisite reading."
"---The San Diego Union-Tribune"

Praise for" The Year's Best Science Fiction Twenty-second Annual Collection"
"Hugo winner Dozois shows off the dazzling range of the genre in his annual compendium.... The range of stories indicates that SF still doesn't know the meaning of the word" boundaries.""
"---Publishers Weekly "(starred review)
"The most prestigious of the several best-of-the-year fantasy and SF anthologies never fails to enchant and to showcase SF's leading edge. In it, high-quality contributions by a generous cross section of veterans, rising stars, and newcomers---twenty-nine authors in all---constitute a balanced mixture of ideas and voices."
"---Booklist"
"Huge multiplicity of first-rate fiction...Is the polished platter underlying a huge layer cake of exquisite reading."
"---The San Diego Union-Tribune"

"Hugo winner Dozois shows off the dazzling range of the genre in his annual compendium.... The range of stories indicates that SF still doesn't know the meaning of the word" boundaries.""
"---Publishers Weekly "(starred review)
"The most prestigious of the several best-of-the-year fantasy and SF anthologies never fails to enchant and to showcase SF's leading edge. In it, high-quality contributions by a generous cross section of veterans, rising stars, and newcomers---twenty-nine authors in all---constitute a balanced mixture of ideas and voices."
"---Booklist"
"Huge multiplicity of first-rate fiction...Is the polished platter underlying a huge layer cake of exquisite reading."
"---The San Diego Union-Tribune"

Hugo winner Dozois shows off the dazzling range of the genre in his annual compendium.... The range of stories indicates that SF still doesn't know the meaning of the word" boundaries." "Publishers Weekly (starred review)"

The most prestigious of the several best-of-the-year fantasy and SF anthologies never fails to enchant and to showcase SF s leading edge. In it, high-quality contributions by a generous cross section of veterans, rising stars, and newcomers---twenty-nine authors in all---constitute a balanced mixture of ideas and voices. "Booklist"

Huge multiplicity of first-rate fiction...Is the polished platter underlying a huge layer cake of exquisite reading. "The San Diego Union-Tribune"" --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

About the Author

Gardner Dozois has been working in the science fiction field for more than thirty years. He was the editor of" Asimov's Science Fiction "for twenty years, during which time he won fifteen Hugo Awards. --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I was very disappointed by this collection of stories published in year 2005 as it was the weakest Gardner Dozois yearly anthology I read until now (I went in all through twenty one collections, from the third to twenty third). There are 30 stories and novellas in this HUGE book, but only three were VERY GOOD ("Clockwork atom bomb", "Softly spoke the gabbleduck", "A case of consilience") and four were good ("The little goddess", "Triceratops summer", "Comber", "Audubon in Atlantis"), the rest ranging from readable to horrible.

Most of the 23 stories which I didn't like suffered from being boring, too weird, depressing and completely devoided of humour. Also, they frequently seemed rushed, with weak endings - clearly most of authors worked on strict deadlines... Finally, most of them were very PREDICTABLE, as most of them contained the same elements: detestation of religion, criticism of capitalism, terminal pessimism and obsession either with nuclear war or global warming...

As all those Gardner Dozois anthologies this book begins with a very complete analysis of what happened in the SF field in 2005. At the end as usual there is a long list of "Honorable mentions" - short stories considered by the editor as good, but which for lack of place (and it is already a HUGE book) couldn't be included. Those elements are, as always, very well done and extremely useful!

Below, more of my impressions about the stories, with some limited SPOILERS
----------------------------------------
"The Little Goddess" by Ian McDonald - a good story, beginning as "classical" SF and continuing into cyberpunk, happening in Nepal and India in a relatively near future.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 4.0 out of 5 stars 11 reviews
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars For My Sister 9 Mar. 2013
By BriMarr - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
My poor sister has been reading the 22nd year of this series over and over again for years. I always get her books for her library, but it's always been the classics until I finally had my "duh" moment: why not start getting here this collection instead? You can buy so many classics, but she would never enjoy them like this series. I just got her this book and she loves it. I'm not as big a sci-fi fan as her, but everyday she comes to me about a new story she's reading about in this book with bright eyes and excitement in her voice. I would recommend this to anyone who loves sci-fi like my sister.
5.0 out of 5 stars I recommend this volume to any lover of science fiction 7 Sept. 2015
By Vivian Nimue - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I don't usually go in for short story collections, but I devoured this one. It's full of unique, well written pieces that were well selected and edited. I recommend this volume to any lover of science fiction.
25 of 28 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Preeminent Science Fiction Anthology 4 Sept. 2006
By J. Brian Watkins - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I was especially anxious for this year's volume because I recently read Mr. Dozois' Amazon Short in which he describes how he goes about preparing his annual best-of volume and in which he recommends that the volume be read cover to cover without skipping through the various stories. In this my twentieth year of reading Mr. Dozois' annual volume, I found that it truly does make a difference to read the stories sequentially as it gave the volume a much more powerful impact.

But let me take a stab at why the book represents more than the sum of its parts: Following Mr. Dozois' absolutely encyclopedic summary of events in the science-fiction world, we first encounter a story by Ian McDonald that treats some timely themes of Artificial Intelligence and the effects of governmental limitations on technology that mirror current attempts to limit internet access. This story has an upbeat and hopeful ending. The theme of the triumph of good over bad continues with Paolo Bacigalupi's story of a dystopic future in which farming is controlled by multi-national corporations--again, a type and shadow of fears concerning control of technological development by virtue of intellectual property rights.

Dozois follows two clearly thematically chosen stories with a first-rate Alastair Reynolds story about a future sailor who gets a bit more than he bargained for that is just excellent science fiction. It is followed by Daryl Gregory's piece about the effects of a future designer drug, an excellent piece of technological extrapolation.

Next are four stories that are surprisingly similar in that they primarily focus on the impact of events upon an individual character: Jay Lake & Ruth Nestvold's superbly rendered story of an eccentric billionaire who develops star travel on his own with fateful consequences to his wife is followed by a Michael Swanwick story about time manipulation and its effect upon the person who understands the ultimate fate of his timeline. Robert Reed's story of a character making his way across the galaxy in a gigantic ship has much to say about the power of one individual to do good. The next story likewise presents Ken MacLeod's tale of a missionary who desires to bring Christianity to an alien lifeform.

Bruce Sterling's story of the Blemmye brings a new perspective to the crusades and thoughfully explores the question of whether our history is everything we believe it to be is followed by a dystopic future-vision of a world destroying itself; William Sanders' Amba. Just as Amba deals with unforseen consequences, so too does Mary Rosenblum's story about a world in which any information is available for a price, Chris Beckett's vision of a world that turns inward to the ultimate rejection of all that is corporeal, and David Gerrold's exploration of the unintended environmental impacts of time travel in Southern California.

He changes gears with a solid work by Stephen Baxter, who has the audacity to present a story of humanity spanning the very life of our Earth but which subtly highlights the interconnection between our civilzation and our environment--albeit on a geologic level. This is followed by a unique future vision by Vonda McIntyre in which humanity exists in a symbiotic relationship with its own technology. Dozois then turns to alternative histories--Gene Wolfe's world adrift and Harry Turtledove's portrayal of Audubon's search for unique birds on a unique continent. These are followed by an utterly unique story by Hannu Rajaniemi about ultimate power and a similar story by Steven Popkes about how the health benefits bestowed by nanobots may come with a price that is not entirely welcome.

Dozois is obviously a believer in saving the best for last because he then throws in two stories that were my personal favorites: Softly Spoke the Gabbleduck by Neal Asher--a story about a hunting expedition gone awry and Zima Blue by Alastair Reynolds which was in my estimation worth the entire volume just by itself, a story about what is truly important. Unfortunately, anything that followed these two stories was bound to suffer by comparison: David Moles' story about a planet where males inexplicably die yet the women are doing just fine; Dominic Green's sobering tale of high technology gone wrong in Africa; Chris Robertson's alternate history in which China is the superpower; and Gwyneth Jones unnecessarily profane and graphic story about space travel.

Peter Watts and Darryl Murphy offer a story about the unintended consequences of creating a conscious program that has a searing ending followed by a likewise emotional story by Elizabeth Bear about the power of expression. The volume ends with a James Patrick Kelly novella that harkens back to Thoreau and asks whether it might be better to live simply and to forego the benefits of modern technology.

I'm convinced that the best way to experience Mr. Dozois' efforts is to start at the beginning and read straight through--despite the fact that the volume presents many different stories and styles, there is an impact carefully designed by the editor that requires this approach. Highly recommended.
0 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Great book - Just didn't like the font 14 May 2007
By Peter Ward - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
As I said in the title...a really nice collection of SF; different types

and styles, all good. Lots of stuff for a great price. I just didn't like

the typeface they used; that is obviously a personal preference.

As usual, Amazon service is tops.
0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Compilation 25 Jan. 2014
By the kook - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
One of my favorites, as it has many stories beyond and far above what you will find in movies and typical TV.
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