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Xenocide: Book 3 of the Ender Saga Paperback – 2 May 2013

3.7 out of 5 stars 102 customer reviews

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Frequently Bought Together

  • Xenocide: Book 3 of the Ender Saga
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  • Speaker For The Dead: Book 2 in the Ender Saga
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  • Children Of The Mind: Book 4 of the Ender Saga
Total price: £21.57
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Product details

  • Paperback: 464 pages
  • Publisher: Orbit (2 May 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0356501868
  • ISBN-13: 978-0356501864
  • Product Dimensions: 12.9 x 2.9 x 19.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (102 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 17,842 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Amazon Review

Xenocide is Card's best-selling sequel to the Hugo Award-winning Ender's Game and Speaker for the Dead. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Review

"The finest science fiction series of the past decade." --"The Columbus Dispatch"

"The best writer science fiction has to offer.' --"The Houston Post"

"As a storyteller, Card excels in portraying the quiet drama of wars fought not on battlefields but in the hearts and minds of his characters....This meaty, graceful, and provoking sequel to "Ender's Game" and "Speaker for the Dead" stands as a brilliant testimony to his thoughtfulness." --"Library Journal"

"Hugo and Nebula-award winner Orson Scott Card demonstrates again that he belongs in the company of such older masters of science fiction as Isaac Asimov, Frank Herbert and Ursula K. Le Guin." --"Magill Book Reviews"

"The best science fiction novel of the year." -"-Nashville Banner"


"The best science fiction novel of the year." -"-Nashville Banner"

The finest science fiction series of the past decade. "The Columbus Dispatch"

The best writer science fiction has to offer. "The Houston Post"

As a storyteller, Card excels in portraying the quiet drama of wars fought not on battlefields but in the hearts and minds of his characters....This meaty, graceful, and provoking sequel to "Ender's Game" and "Speaker for the Dead" stands as a brilliant testimony to his thoughtfulness. "Library Journal"

Hugo and Nebula-award winner Orson Scott Card demonstrates again that he belongs in the company of such older masters of science fiction as Isaac Asimov, Frank Herbert and Ursula K. Le Guin. "Magill Book Reviews"

The best science fiction novel of the year. "Nashville Banner"" --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
It reminded me of Frank Herbert's Dune series - stunning first book is head-spinningly brilliant, second book has maybe a little less verve and swagger but nevertheless delivers and then the third one starts to suffer from Lorenzian urges and just loses impetus under the increasingly suffocating swathes of irrelevance and invention for its own sake. It flies off to the left and right like a kid with Tourette's, barking here and howling there but never engaging or startling as Ender's Game did. By now I'm a little sick of Andrew Wiggins (and starting to think how sad it would be if the universe were indeed multiply saved by someone called Andrew Wiggins) and feeling he's something of a smug wee prig.

I liked the Chinese girl idea, but again the execution became wearysome. By the time we discover faster-than-light flight (by sitting in a cardboard box and rubbing the side of our noses) I've seen visions of Paul as a sandworm - a book I last read over 30 years ago - and remembered the frustration of a legendary saga that hit the ground running and then just started digging until it ran out of steam.

A shame, that...
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I can't say for sure that each of the three Ender's Saga books I've read has been better than the last - they're all too different to really invite easy comparisons. I will say though that I thought Speaker for the Dead was much better than Ender's Game, and I think Xenocide is every bit as good as Speaker for the Dead. It has the same contemplative, introspective philosophising as SftD but with an entirely different focus. It also benefits from introducing a new thread of the story, centred on Qing-Jao and her father - the Godspoken of a colony planet called Path. I began feeling somewhat cold towards this part of the tale, but as it went on it grew to be my favourite lens through which to view the actions of the main protagonists. It offered a view of the bigger picture of the ongoing political context that deepened the more intimate portrayals of the main story.

If the book suffers from anything, it's a kind of 'sequel fatigue' - at the end of the third Ender's book, I was ready for the whole thing to be wrapped up. I was somewhat disappointed that it continues onto a fourth book since it seems that it could so easily have been an extremely good trilogy rather than a somewhat stretched out quadrology. A particular 'plot twist' at the end removes any real hope of a satisfactory conclusion and sends the series spiralling off into a direction that veers dangerously into the territory of its own posterior. The final chapter of Xenocide is as poignant as any I've read in science-fiction, and it would have been a fitting capstone for a tremendously well constructed body of work. Whether I still feel that way after Children of the Mind remains to be seen, but I can't say I've started that with anything approaching the enthusiasm with which I started Xenocide.
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Format: Paperback
First two books in Ender series are wonderful reads with a gripping storyline and excellent writing. Well, the third book has the same excellent writing but lacks the storyline.
No wonder Mr.Card is a great writer; whatever he writes he writes it good. Unfortunately Xenocide serves the purpose of bringing up a number of muddled ideas rather than telling a story. As a matter of fact there are so many ideas (overcoming an intelligent virus, how to save Jane, the Godspoken, Novinha's frustration against Ender, Ender's "split" personality, piggies' rights, virus rights, Bugger's way of thinking, Inside and Outside, faster-than-light-travel and some more minor things) that all comes to frustrating complexity and since the author does not have enough "time" (number of pages) to devote to each idea, almost everything except a few becomes muddled.
At the end, since the author creates more problems than necessary for a book - that can be handled in a single book - in order to neatly tie all that mess up, he has to resort to deus ex machina by means of hard sci-fi. Well Mr. Card is a great writer of characters, but he's not that great in hard sc-fi; thus his attempt makes you feel kinda cheated.
Overall this is an inescapable book. If you've started Ender Saga you'll have to read this. Thanks to Card's writing, it is still a fun read but especially with its ending it is unsatisfactory.
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Format: Paperback
Wow, I really liked the previous two books in the Ender series, but this one was hard work. Too often the narrative flow stalls with character's self musings that are a little too esoteric, literally when this starts you can skip two or three pages and the skipped material has zero impact on the overall plot. The characters are also less likeable, I found myself not really caring what happended to any of them. I mean it isn't a terrible book, it simply isn't as engaging as its predecessors.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
First let me clarify, I *loved* the first two books. They moved along at a good pace, with Ender filling the typical “chosen one” role, but bringing something new each time. In the first book he was a child prodigy, the second he was the Speaker of the Dead, a writer of wrongs… thoroughly enjoyable.

WHAT THE HELL HAPPENED!?

Around 70% of this story was taken up with pseudo-philosophical debates that went in circles before going NOWHERE (GAHHHHHHHHH!), arguments between Ender’s step family that went NOWHERE, and normal conversations that went on TOO LONG. e.g:

(Jane and Ender)
Ender: Do it
Jane: I’m not sure I should do it
Ender: Well [reason why you should do it]
Jane: I’m not sure
[See line 1, and repeat for several pages]

Now imaging this formula done with philosophy in EVERY chapter, mixed in with family-feuds in EVERY CHAPTER.

WHERE THE HELL WAS THE EDITOR!? GAHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHH!!

This piece of crap was around 20% longer than the previous installations, and it had about a quarter of the story!!!! GRRRRRRR!! I am so annoyed!

Much like the second and third Matrix films, it seems as though the author has started believing his own press and tried to add too much philosophy and hidden meanings to the point where an “okay” story has become bloated and irritating.

A favourite quote of mine (after I’d put up with all of this **** for about 75% of the book):

“…my adoptive nephew, it is wild philosophy we need…”

GAHHHH!!! NO… MORE… PHILOSOPHY! STOP MAKING EVERYTHING LONG AND BAD!!!!

This has got to be the first time I have finished a book out of pure spite.
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