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Worlds Apart CD

4.0 out of 5 stars 11 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Audio CD (31 Jan. 2005)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: CD
  • Label: Polydor Group
  • ASIN: B00078EPNI
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  Vinyl  |  MP3 Download
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 74,221 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)
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Product Description

Product Description

...And You Will Know Us by the Trail of Dead have always been an ambitious, and difficult to place, band. They're too earnest and fond of grand gestures to fit in with most of the indie rock world, but too arty and obscure to jell with most emo's heart-on-sleeve directness. On Worlds Apart, they remain hard to classify, except on their own terms. Though the Trail of Dead sound as angry, regretful, and hopeful as they did when they started, this is a much more polished album than their breakthrough, Source Tags & Codes, and their fiery sound is tempered by nods to '70s prog and album rock. The band deserves some credit for attempting to work on such a grand scale -- it's all too easy for this kind of big, passionate statement to fall on its face -- but while Worlds Apart doesn't work entirely, enough of it is compelling. Granted, it doesn't have the most promising beginning: "Ode to Isis," with its Wagnerian choral vocals, pianos, violins, screaming, and crying, is equally worrying and intriguing, and "Will You Smile Again?" doesn't really take off until the six-and-a-half-minute mark. However, the next four tracks rank among the Trail of Dead's best work: despite railing against vacuous celebrities, soccer moms, indie rock, and, of course, post-9/11 fallout and the war on terrorism, the emotions behind "Worlds Apart" are timeless; along with the frustrated idealism of "The Rest Will Follow," it's one of the band's finest anthems. "The Summer of '91"'s thundering timpani rolls and slow-building majesty use Worlds Apart's massive-sounding productions and arrangements artfully; it's been a long time -- possibly since Smashing Pumpkins' heyday -- since a band has attempted this kind of epic-scale, orchestrated rock. Speaking of the Pumpkins, "Caterwaul"'s beautifully droning guitar grind is more than a little reminiscent of that band's best rockers. Worlds Apart's second half dives deeper into prog: "A Classic Arts Showcase" and "All White" both feature soulful choirs that sound like they were transplanted directly from The Wall, but while they feel tacked onto the former song, they fit -- in a retro kind of way -- the latter song's excesses. "To Russia My Homeland," a theatrical, string-based waltz, isn't bad at all, although it seems more suited to a soundtrack than this album. It's tempting to want to hear some of these songs, particularly "The Best" and "Lost City of Refuge," delivered in a less grandiose manner, but the band's attack on complacency extends to its own music, and Worlds Apart scores points for not having merely revisited previous successes. [This edition includes two bonus tracks.]

Amazon.co.uk

Not content with being the cult heroes of thousands, the members of And You Will Know Us by the Trail of Dead have set their sights on becoming the idols of millions with Worlds Apart. They're still as noisy as ever, but they've further toned down the weirdness that had already started fading away on their previous album, Source Tags and Codes. What's left is the strongest songwriting this band have yet displayed, and their best--and most accessible--album yet. "Caterwaul" has an energetic, rolling bounce that sure to make it a live standard for years to come, while the title track manages to fit years of punk vitriol into three minutes of understated anger. That any of these songs wouldn't sound out of place on the soundtrack to any American teen drama is no disrespect. The new sound of the Trail of Dead is subtler, but their music is just as revolutionary. And with Worlds Apart, they're taking themselves directly into the mainstream. --Robert Burrow

Customer Reviews

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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Audio CD
This album annoyed a few people.

I have a friend who holds ToD in very high regard. He's a massive fan of all the other albums, and I'd ordered Worlds Apart off the internet and told him gleefully it was over the Atlantic as we spoke at a pub in town. He peered at me over his pint glass, and his eyes filled with a sense of loss as he spoke "Aaargh, it's complete rubbish".

Yet it seemed when I finally got the wrapper off the album and played it I was pretty blown away by the first few tracks. And then the tracks after that. I really really like this album, here's why:

a) It's completely different to anything Conrad et al have done before

b) Which means it's refreshing

And here's why it annoyed some of the other hardcore ToD fans:

a) It's completely different to anything Conrad et al have done before

b) Which means it's alienating and disgusting

The opening tracks are the now complimentary Trail of Dead instrumental "Ode To Isis", which alludes you for a bit before the album starts proper, and "Will You Smile Again?" begins. The immediate effect on you is how different this album is compared to the others. There are trumpets overlaying tribal drums, a lone vocal part with nothing but drums in the background, Conrad's strained voice in perfect harmony with the music. Then after all that it erupts back into the same earthshaking noise it began with. The title track, Worlds Apart, follows. This one shocks for a different reason, children's laughing followed by vulgarities from the band, foul lyrics (but true, foul lyrics) throughout this song alone give the album a dark tone. It's a great song though, a singalong, almost happy tune about death and decay in modern America. Just smile and accept it.
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Format: Audio CD
this album is a grower - when I first heard it I wasnt sure what to think, however continued listening has made this my favourite Trail Of Dead album. If you have listened to TOD since the beginning this will be a welcome departure. Sure, another Madonna/Source Tags would have been better received no doubt but the problem with many bands nowadays, not least Oasis, is that they are unwilling to depart from their original sound and become predictable and boring.
There are many stand out tracks on this album - my favourites are Worlds Apart, The Rest Will Follow and All White which has hints of Pink Floyd's Dark Side of the Moon. Buy this album, but maybe not a good starting point for new fans.
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Format: Audio CD
I was to see them at a festival last year so this album was my first buy of theirs.

At first I found it a little same'y to be honest. But when I took the time to listen and focus in on the tracks I began to notice the thought gone in to this album.

The production is really quite incredible, Mike McCarthy has proven himself with this album to be one of the best rock producers going today (in my humble opinion).

I am very reluctant to give out 5-stars willy nilly but the time gone into this album has truely earned it, and that's just the production!

... Trail of the Dead have taken a huge step in composition skills and have proven that they are not just another middle of the road rock band. Incorporating a choir, orchestra, and not to mention the lovely Hilary Hahn (award winning violinist).

Live they were incredible (2 drumkits! GET IN!!), but this is not a live show review.

This album sits happily on the "My Favourite Albums of 2005" list and I continue (a year later) to put this album on as a pick me up still discovering new sounds and styles.

But like I said, it can take a little time but ultimately this album is monsterously rewarding ... in fact, I wonder if any of those that have given a bad review are still in the same mind!?
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Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
I have to say here now ladies and gentry folk of the alternative nation this is my fave TOD album. The thing that sets this apart from the others which are brilliant also is the themes which are beautifully orchestrated throughout with some nice sax and eccentric violins making their appearance.
From their typical trademark instrumental opener Ode To Isis with its classical overtones ending in a softly spoken female voice "AND YOU WILL KNOW US BY THE TRAIL OF DEAD!" you just know this is going to be a huge record and it is.
Will You Smile Again For Me offers up much of that wonderful wall of sound noise we all have come to know and love about TOD propelled along by some thunderous double drumming from Jason Reece and Kevin Allen, 2/3 of the centrum of this amazing band. A real foot stomper too.
The title track starts with children mocking and Conrad shouting "F**k you man!" and is a scathing attack on corporate media manipulation.
Elsewhere there is the beautiful piano driven Summer of '91 which tries to resolve lost moments and opportunities in time by accepting the concept of the 'forever now' philosophy which is their standpoint in their stream of consciousness lyrics.

The Rest Will Follow asks all the right questions of humanity and is simply a beautiful and heartfelt song that just stays in your head forever. Probably their best -

"IT'S JUST SOMETHING IN OUR DESIGN." Indeed! Conrad Keely's voice just gets better and better along with co singer Reece.

Caterwaul borrows the Immigrant Song riff from Zeppelin and puts another spin on it. It is a superb tune, and one of the standouts among many.
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