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World Ocean Census: A Global Survey of Maritime Life Hardcover – 26 Oct 2009


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Product details

  • Hardcover: 256 pages
  • Publisher: Firefly Books Ltd; First Edition edition (26 Oct. 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1554074347
  • ISBN-13: 978-1554074341
  • Product Dimensions: 22.9 x 2.1 x 27.9 cm
  • Average Customer Review: Be the first to review this item
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,402,244 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
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Review

It includes critical data that will be studied for decades to come.... Hundreds of breathtaking, full-color photographs.--N. S. Arun Kumar, BSc Botany, BEd Life Science, Member Indian Science Writers Association, European Science Journalists' Resource Group"AkN Science blogspot.com" (04/30/2010)

The excitement of discovery...shines through what could have been dry reportage.--Nancy Bent"Booklist" (12/15/2009)

Overall, this is an attractive book and it is modestly priced. Most general readers will find topics of interest.--Ralph Lee Scott"American Reference Books Annual" (01/01/2009)

The general public, students, and even scientists...will find this book a captivating read.--Frank M. Truesdale, emeritus, Louisiana State University"Science Books and Film" (04/01/2010)

Lavishly illustrated.--Bill Robertson"Saskatoon Star Phoenix" (12/19/2009)

With its striking photography and high production standards, the book unfolds as a visual celebration of the Census.--Charles H. Greene, Director, Ocean Resources and Ecosystems Program, Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, Cornell University"Oceanography" (03/01/2010)

The survey reveals some of those hidden denizens of the deep...And everywhere looms the threat of extinction.--Dan Vergano"USA Today" (12/12/2009)

This will appeal to readers attracted to nature photography [and] anyone interested in the ocean, science, or global climate change.--Maggie Roux, Marine Biological Laboratory and Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution Library"Library Journal" (11/15/2009)

The World Ocean Census is compilation of a 10-year research effort into examining marine life.... Overall, this is an attractive book and it is modestly priced. Most general readers will find topics of interest.--Ralph Lee Scott"American Reference Books Annual" (01/01/2009)

A first-rate browsing item, from the bicycle-riding frog on the front cover to the recipe for chocolate-covered crickets at the end to entries designed for microscopic attention spans, Turner presents barrages of snippets on extreme sports ("chessboxing"), uncommon maladies ("exploding head syndrome"), oddball festivals, bizarre beliefs ("Eating stolen bacon is a cure for constipation." Do tell!), strange creatures real or otherwise, supernatural phenomena and, as they say, much, much more. It's not just straight reportage, either, as along with the chocolate snacks, the author tucks in directions for creating green ectoplasm, several magic tricks and other hands-on activities. Unusually for compendia of this ilk, she also includes a URL or other source on each single-topic spread. Illustrated with photos that are often startling but never gory or gross, this compact page-turner will light up the imaginations of motivated young readers and jaded nonreaders alike.

Since 2000, thousands of scientists have been engaged in the Census of Marine Life, with the goals of determining what lived in the world's oceans in the past, what lives there now, and what will live there in the future. This visually stunning and highly readable book deals with the adventures and experiences of the scientists involved with the Census, and with how they are gathering data using both modern research vessels and sources as diverse as old whaling logbooks, fish bones found in archaeological digs, restaurant menus, and old photographs and postcards. Individual sections focus on topics including the logistics of the census and the cutting-edge technology used to project the uncertain future of the world's oceans. Profusely illustrated (mainly in full color), this volume should appeal to a wide audience. This visually stunning and highly readable book deals with the adventures and experiences of the scientists involved with the Census, and with how they are gathering data using both modern research vessels and sources as diverse as old whaling logbooks, fish bones found in archaeological digs, restaurant menus, and old photographs and postcards. Individual sections focus on topics including the logistics of the census and the cutting-edge technology used to project the uncertain future of the world's oceans. Profusely illustrated (mainly in full color), this volume should appeal to a wide audience. [starred review] As industrial fishing fleets have mined the seas of life before scientists get a chance to study it, an international consortium of scientists, funded by their governments, began a collaborative effort in 2000 to catalog every living organism living in the global ocean. Scientists voyaged to regions that had never been studied before, such as the Gaskel Ridge in the Arctic, where unique hydrothermal vent communities were found, while others researched the human history of marine resource management to get an idea of pre-industrial ocean life..

For those with a natural curiosity about our ocean planet, this new book by an award-winning author and two experienced marine educators is indeed timely and well-written. Superbly designed, the book evokes the majesty and mystery of life in the oceans through the use of captivating photographs, novel graphics, and easy-to-read text. Thorough and consistently high editorial standards are readily apparent.

World Ocean Census is a gorgeous book that would make a great gift for someone who enjoys the ocean or works in a related field, or a great book to have on your own shelf as a reference.--Jennifer Kennedy"about.com" (12/01/2009)

The excitement of discovery, particularly the almost constant revelation of species new to science, shines through what could have been dry reportage, and numerous photographs, many of the new species, illuminate the text.--Nancy Bent"Booklist" (12/15/2009)

This volume is a visual treat with its beautiful photographs of marine life from all parts of the ocean. Recommended.--J. C. Briggs, emeritus, Oregon State University"Choice" (04/01/2010)

The Census of Marine Life is a global network of scientists in more than 80 nations involved in a ten-year project to assess and explain the diversity of life in the oceans. On first examination, this appears to be a typical oversize book dedicated to beautiful underwater photography; however, in well-written text, [the authors] describe the various aspects of the Census for the educated layperson. Illustrated with examples of creatures found in all parts of the oceans, including many newly discovered and never-before-described species, chapters cover the different project groups, how they are gathering and publishing data, and why this is important. Several one- to four-page inserts explain such concepts as hydrothermal processes and the global ocean current conveyor belt.... This will appeal to readers attracted to nature photography as well as anyone interested in the ocean, science, or global climate change. Also useful for high school or college courses on climate, oceanography, or biology.--Maggie Roux, Marine Biological Laboratory and Wood"Library Journal" (11/15/2009)

As the Census [of Marine Life] draws to a conclusion, it is an appropriate time to assess its accomplishments. World Ocean Census: A Global Survey of Marine Life is the first attempt to present these accomplishments in a format that is accessible to a broad audience. With its striking photography and high production standards, the book unfolds as a visual celebration of the Census. Marine biodiversity and the excitement of ocean exploration come alive as the reader thumbs through the pages and marvels at images collected from Census projects throughout the world ocean. As a coffee-table book, World Ocean Census succeeds admirably.... The most memorable message of World Ocean Census is that we must explore the ocean and understand its biodiversity before it's too late.... World Ocean Census is a start in the right direction.--Charles H. Greene, Director, Ocean Resources and E"Oceanography" (03/01/2010)

This lavishly illustrated book comes in three parts: What Lived in the Ocean?, What Lives in the Ocean?, and What Will Live in the Ocean?, and along the way talks of the global ocean conveyor belt, the disappearing ice oceans, and the mystery of new life forms. The creatures range from the microscopic to a great white shark, cruising with its mouth wide open.--Bill Robertson"Saskatoon Star Phoenix" (12/19/2009)

About the only corner of the planet neglected by [a] world atlas, the ocean teems with hidden stories uncovered in this first-ever census of marine life... The survey reveals some of those hidden denizens of the deep, from the vampire squid to the flamingo tongue snail to the shoulderbar soldierfish, each as exotic-looking as their names. Census scientists have tagged seals, salmon and sooty shearwater shorebirds with transmitters to follow migrations. Arctic and Antarctic expeditions reveal changing populations under the pressure of a warming ocean. And everywhere looms the threat of extinction for overfished seafood stocks. "Above all, the breakthroughs in knowledge gained, and awareness of the magnitude of what remains to be discovered, inspire hope that the greatest era of ocean exploration - and ocean care - will now begin.--Dan Vergano"USA Today" (12/12/2009)

I love books that can easily be read by both a layperson and a scientist, and this is one of them. There's enough background information that anyone could pick up this book and enjoy it, but enough technical information to make the book a useful reference for someone who works with marine life. 5/5 stars.--Jennifer Kennedy, Marine Life Guide"About.com" (01/01/2012)

The articles are written in an open and accessible style.--A. Hauge"Journal of the Norwegian Medical Association" (07/01/2010)

The general public, students, and even scientists interested in getting up to speed on the latest will find this book a captivating read. I would like to think that every high school library would have a copy of the book and that advisors would bring it to the attention of students contemplating a career in things oceanic. The works of William Beebe, Rachel Carson, and Jacques Cousteau inflected the careers of past and present marine scientists; this book promises a future in studies of the global ocean that those pioneers could never have envisioned.--Frank M. Truesdale, emeritus, Louisiana State Univ"Science Books and Film" (04/01/2010)

The book is at its best when it offers glimpses of the astonishing array of sea creatures revealed by the survey... [It] is full of high-quality photographs [that] reveal strange, recently discovered species... Fittingly, World Ocean Census begins and ends with spectacular photos of jellyfish, which are supremely suited to exploiting the niches created by overfishing. How humans respond to the trends revealed by the census will largely determine whether this 'jellification' of the ocean will continue, or if crippled marine populations may have a chance to recover.--Mark Schrope"Nature Vol 462/19" (11/01/2009)

About the Author

Darlene Trew Crist works with media relations on the Census of Marine Life. Gail Scowcroft and James M Harding are marine scientists at the University of Rhode Island.


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