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The World Atlas of Wine, 6th Edition Hardcover – 18 Oct 2007

4.7 out of 5 stars 24 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Hardcover: 400 pages
  • Publisher: Mitchell Beazley; 6th Revised edition edition (18 Oct. 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1845333012
  • ISBN-13: 978-1845333010
  • Product Dimensions: 24.1 x 3.8 x 29.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (24 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 266,440 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

Product Description

Review

Praise for the 5th edition

"Wine Book of the Millennium" Decanter

"This is the best collaboration of two Brits since Lennon and McCartney" -Ben Giliberti, Washington Post

"Consistently glittering" Times Literary Supplement

Book Description

A global best-seller. More than 47,000 copies of the 5th edition sold through Bookscan in the UK alone Completely updated to reflect the huge changes in the world of wine in the last 6 years Refreshed design - brand new full colour photographs and revised maps Guaranteed promotion from the world's greatest wine duo, Hugh Johnson and Jancis Robinson A must-have book for general wine lovers and wine trade professionals alike

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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
I got this for my birthday as a wine drinker and lover, and have got a lot out of it. The maps are great, and the detail on each district valuable. Had every producer been reviewed would the book have been extremely large, so a backrground on the typical conditions and wines of the major districts helps to understand better the wines that you drink. I must admit that my next buy would be a more exhaustive catalogue of every wine producer but such a book would have been harder to read.

The history of wine and the decription of each countries and of wine production and techniques is great. I recommend this a a detailed and good overview.
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Format: Hardcover
At 400 pages, British wine experts Huge Johnson and Jancis Robinson have created their most exhaustive atlas yet, and a tremendous resource. The book is gorgeous - with a generous amount of color illustrations, photos, and maps, including 2 page spreads. All told there are 48 extra pages over the previous edition.

The 6th edition contains 200 maps, all revised and updates, including 20 new maps. The introduction contains essays on wine in the ancient world, vine types, grape varieties, weather, terroir, the wine growers calendar, how wine is made, etc. etc. Robinson has said this new edition took two years of concentrated effort. It was worth it!

Then the authors dive deep into wine regions organized by country. Each region or country covered has a colored map, an essay about the characteristics of the reason, vital statistics, and a few wine labels. France has the most with 55 regions featured, indeed, a quarter of the volume (100 pages) is on France. Italy features 18 regions. Spain 9. Portugal 6. Germany 12. United States 17. Australia 12. New Zealand 4. Other countries covered include: England and Wales, Switzerland, Austria, Hungary, Czech Republic, Slovenia, Western Balkans, Bulgaria, Romania, Former Soviet Republics, Greece, Eastern Mediterranean, North Africa, South Africa, China, Japan, and the rest of Asia. I find the information scant on Chile and Argentina, which is odd given their increased market exposure and rising excellence of wines.

The authors have expanded New World coverage, in keeping with expanded exposure and quality of the wine produced in these regions, for Australia, New Zealand, Argentina, South America, and South Africa. These are additions, with nothing taken away from the previous fabulous coverage of Old & New World wine regions.
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Format: Hardcover
The ever increasing size of this book reflects the increasing interest in wine, so it now lands with an impressive thump on your desktop. Though its content doesn't always reflect who that new market is.

The authors start with a, rather meandering, description of the history and production of wine and some basic notes on tasting, appreciation and handling of wine. Some of this is very useful, most of it is very basic for someone who already knows the subject and all of it could do with some editing to make the best of their material. Some of it punctures some of the myths about wine such as how long wines should be laid down and do you really need to let wine breath. Elsewhere they perpetuate some of those myths, for example they still seem to give the whole concept of 'terroir' an almost mystical reverence.

That introduction, however, is not really the point of this volume. This appears to be aimed at the new wine connoisseur or someone who wants to be a connoisseur. The real body of this is a fairly comprehensive atlas of vineyards and producers. The detail with which they cover their subject is variable but excusably so as it reflects the varying national interest in wine. So France is covered in incredible detail while England, however much it's wine industry may be growing, is given one brief page. That sort of omission is annoying when you had hoped for something comprehensive, but it's an understandable omission given the limited space any single book will have. As long as you stick to well established wine producing regions and buy from those regions this will have something to tell you.

Which, excellent as it is, is also a problem this book has.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This is a really excellent book for its information, maps, photography and expert knowledge. Its definitly one to return to again and again to check a quick fact, or to flick through casually and browse (and still find yourself reading 2 hours later) The detailed maps are particularly helpful and very interesting to look over, and help to gain a fuller understanding of each region.

It does of course have a predictable balance towards France in its huge detail on French regions, which is a great resource to refer to, though it is not a luxury afforded to any other country. In the introduction to Italy for example, the writers put Italy almost on a par with France in terms of importance, but then proceed to give it a third of the page space. Personally I usually favour Italian at least as much as French, although I concede that France has had more essential impact on international varieties and styles, but Italy has more of its own varieties than any other country, and deserves almost equal billing. France continues to be of massive importance of course, just be warned that this book doesn't quite give you a 21st century picture, with anything like the same detail on the New World, or modern Italy and Spain, although I guess that would make it a much bigger book!
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