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Work

Work

27 Dec 2005
4.3 out of 5 stars 3 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Original Release Date: 27 Dec. 2005
  • Release Date: 2 Jun. 2006
  • Label: Capitol Records (new release)
  • Copyright: (C) 2005 Capitol Records, Inc.. All rights reserved. Manufactured by Capitol Records, Inc., 1750 N. Vine Street, Hollywood, California 90028. Unauthorized Reproduction is a Violation of Applicable Law
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 19:46
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B001S12EH2
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars 3 customer reviews
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Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

By E. A Solinas HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWER on 10 Feb. 2007
Format: Audio CD
One of the more promising young bands in the last few years is the Sound Team, an Austin band that isn't getting half the attention they deserve with their debut album. But it started with "Work," a solid little EP full of Spoon-ish rock'n'roll, loopy electronics and raw potential.

It opens with the raw, jagged chords of "The Fastest Man Alive," a driving rocker full of taut, muscular riffs and lots of verve. But then they take the opposite approach in the dribbling keyboard of "It's Obvious What's Happening Here," with a few riffs and chords drowned in a sea of somnolent keyboard and loopy blips. Good stuff.

Then it's back to driving rock'n'roll in the energetic, rough-edged "Orange Bird," and the slow-burning buildup of "In the Dark No One Can Hear You Sweat," which sounds a bit like a Velvet Underground B-side. And finally they lapse back to the keyboard stuff, with the ominous, bell-like pop of "Don't Turn Away."

You can tell when an EP is good, because it satisfies as an individual nugget of music, while at the same time leaving you wanting a full album. That's pretty much what is going on in "Work," which is overflowing with the band's talent and musical aplomb -- you'll rush out to buy their debut.

Admittedly, the band is a bit rough here -- their musical skills are still unpolished, and every now and then they have a slack moment. However, this is clearly because they're a young band -- the muscular guitar and bass erupt from their infectious melodies, backed by some very organ-like keyboard and smashing drums. Pure, punky rock'n'roll.

In fact, sometimes that rock'n'roll gets so powerful that it overwhelms even the lead singer. Matt Oliver gets drowned out by the music at several points, making it hard to hear exactly what he's singing.
Read more ›
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By E. A Solinas HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWER on 4 Feb. 2007
Format: Audio CD
One of the more promising young bands in the last few years is the Sound Team, an Austin band that isn't getting half the attention they deserve with their debut album. But it started with "Work," a solid little EP full of Spoon-ish rock'n'roll, loopy electronics and raw potential.

It opens with the raw, jagged chords of "The Fastest Man Alive," a driving rocker full of taut, muscular riffs and lots of verve. But then they take the opposite approach in the dribbling keyboard of "It's Obvious What's Happening Here," with a few riffs and chords drowned in a sea of somnolent keyboard and loopy blips. Good stuff.

Then it's back to driving rock'n'roll in the energetic, rough-edged "Orange Bird," and the slow-burning buildup of "In the Dark No One Can Hear You Sweat," which sounds a bit like a Velvet Underground B-side. And finally they lapse back to the keyboard stuff, with the ominous, bell-like pop of "Don't Turn Away."

You can tell when an EP is good, because it satisfies as an individual nugget of music, while at the same time leaving you wanting a full album. That's pretty much what is going on in "Work," which is overflowing with the band's talent and musical aplomb -- you'll rush out to buy their debut.

Admittedly, the band is a bit rough here -- their musical skills are still unpolished, and every now and then they have a slack moment. However, this is clearly because they're a young band -- the muscular guitar and bass erupt from their infectious melodies, backed by some very organ-like keyboard and smashing drums. Pure, punky rock'n'roll.

In fact, sometimes that rock'n'roll gets so powerful that it overwhelms even the lead singer. Matt Oliver gets drowned out by the music at several points, making it hard to hear exactly what he's singing.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Audio CD
If you loved Movie Monster, then you should get this for two reasons:

1. "In The Dark No One Can Hear You Sweat", which is the darkest, richest thing they have written to date. It is very rare for a song to convey such desperation and loss, but to follow it with such a beautiful second half, similar to the latter half of the Stone Roses "Standing Here" and resembling frankly, the best of chemical rushes, is astounding. It's a crime this didn't end the album. 'Nuff said.

2. "Fastest Man Alive" is an incredible song. Rich and wonderfully uplifting, theres Moody Blues, Northern Soul and early Brian Eno in here. A mix of the best snare drumming this side of the millenium in the versus, but unfortunately also the most over hit crash symbol near the end. A nice transition to "It's Obvious What's Happening Here" too.

Like most Sound Team recordings, these tunes work best on earphones, Matt Oliver's voice sometimes can get lost in the massively rich noise Sound Team make, when heard on speakers.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 4.7 out of 5 stars 6 reviews
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fantastic Major Label Debut EP From a Great Austin Band 30 Dec. 2005
By iamdmann - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
First EP in wide release from Austin's Sound Team. Released in anticipation of their full length record due in 2006, Sound Team, who appeared in New York's Central Park with Arcade Fire and David Bowie in 2005, have a fresh sound that is part rock, part alternative, and should be a welcome addition to fans of The Walkmen, Arcade Fire, Bloc Party, and Radiohead. Overall a great introduction to a great new band.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Extraordinary talent and infectious grooves 11 May 2006
By Fonz - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
Amazing sounds come out of this band...unique, complex, layered--totally infectious. Each song envelopes you in a swirl of sounds--they catch a groove and you can't help but find yourself closing your eyes and nodding your head. The moog is an excellent addition--not an overpowering sound--it simply accentuates what's already going on. These are some highly talented musicians, not to mention some of the nicest and most sincere guys I've ever met. They are absolutely AMAZING live. I can't wait for their major label debut in June 2006!
4.0 out of 5 stars Sounds like Work 6 Feb. 2007
By E. A Solinas - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
One of the more promising young bands in the last few years is the Sound Team, an Austin band that isn't getting half the attention they deserve with their debut album. But it started with "Work," a solid little EP full of Spoon-ish rock'n'roll, loopy electronics and raw potential.

It opens with the raw, jagged chords of "The Fastest Man Alive," a driving rocker full of taut, muscular riffs and lots of verve. But then they take the opposite approach in the dribbling keyboard of "It's Obvious What's Happening Here," with a few riffs and chords drowned in a sea of somnolent keyboard and loopy blips. Good stuff.

Then it's back to driving rock'n'roll in the energetic, rough-edged "Orange Bird," and the slow-burning buildup of "In the Dark No One Can Hear You Sweat," which sounds a bit like a Velvet Underground B-side. And finally they lapse back to the keyboard stuff, with the ominous, bell-like pop of "Don't Turn Away."

You can tell when an EP is good, because it satisfies as an individual nugget of music, while at the same time leaving you wanting a full album. That's pretty much what is going on in "Work," which is overflowing with the band's talent and musical aplomb -- you'll rush out to buy their debut.

Admittedly, the band is a bit rough here -- their musical skills are still unpolished, and every now and then they have a slack moment. However, this is clearly because they're a young band -- the muscular guitar and bass erupt from their infectious melodies, backed by some very organ-like keyboard and smashing drums. Pure, punky rock'n'roll.

In fact, sometimes that rock'n'roll gets so powerful that it overwhelms even the lead singer. Matt Oliver gets drowned out by the music at several points, making it hard to hear exactly what he's singing. Hut he has a wonderfully howly voice that seems to be constantly battling it out with the bass and guitars.

Sound Team's debut EP is a wonderfully unpretentious, infectious, and rocking piece of work, and will have listeners rushing to their first full-length album. A delight.
2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Sounds like "Work" 13 Jan. 2007
By E. A Solinas - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
One of the more promising young bands in the last few years is the Sound Team, an Austin band that isn't getting half the attention they deserve with their debut album. But it started with "Work," a solid little EP full of Spoon-ish rock'n'roll, loopy electronics and raw potential.

It opens with the raw, jagged chords of "The Fastest Man Alive," a driving rocker full of taut, muscular riffs and lots of verve. But then they take the opposite approach in the dribbling keyboard of "It's Obvious What's Happening Here," with a few riffs and chords drowned in a sea of somnolent keyboard and loopy blips. Good stuff.

Then it's back to driving rock'n'roll in the energetic, rough-edged "Orange Bird," and the slow-burning buildup of "In the Dark No One Can Hear You Sweat," which sounds a bit like a Velvet Underground B-side. And finally they lapse back to the keyboard stuff, with the ominous, bell-like pop of "Don't Turn Away."

You can tell when an EP is good, because it satisfies as an individual nugget of music, while at the same time leaving you wanting a full album. That's pretty much what is going on in "Work," which is overflowing with the band's talent and musical aplomb -- you'll rush out to buy their debut.

Admittedly, the band is a bit rough here -- their musical skills are still unpolished, and every now and then they have a slack moment. However, this is clearly because they're a young band -- the muscular guitar and bass erupt from their infectious melodies, backed by some very organ-like keyboard and smashing drums. Pure, punky rock'n'roll.

In fact, sometimes that rock'n'roll gets so powerful that it overwhelms even the lead singer. Matt Oliver gets drowned out by the music at several points, making it hard to hear exactly what he's singing. Hut he has a wonderfully howly voice that seems to be constantly battling it out with the bass and guitars.

Sound Team's debut EP is a wonderfully unpretentious, infectious, and rocking piece of work, and will have listeners rushing to their first full-length album. A delight.
5.0 out of 5 stars But a taste of what's to come... 9 Jan. 2006
By PBB - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
There's something happening here that hasn't been done. Maybe it's their aesthetic, the fact that one of their guitarists painted the album cover, or the fact that they do everything themselves -- I've read that 'Work' was recorded in its entirety in their own studio analog studio in Austin, TX...by Spoon's producer, no less.

So what will you find? Loads of analog ambience, clangy distorted guitars, and swashes of ethereal keyboards in a perfectly wrapped parcel. A stunning debut from a truly refreshing six-piece. Expect great things.
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