Learn more Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Learn More Shop now Learn more Shop Fire Shop Kindle New Edition - Sgt. Pepper Shop now Shop Women's Shop Men's

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
25
4.3 out of 5 stars
Your rating(Clear)Rate this item


There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

on 13 April 2017
This book is an invaluable repository of knowledge. Written before NLP was hi-jacked by every charlatan who wanted to use it to make a fast buck and based on solid research, Shelle Rose Charvet illustrates some terrifically useful methods to increase your personal influence in conversation and print!
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 2 March 2017
A really useful book, a lot of information but she has a supporting website to help with understanding. We use this book at a book club recently, very useful discussing the ideas as a group.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 23 September 2015
Interesting start, then goes into therapy dialogues, long and lost focus. Couldn't finish it.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 18 September 2003
Only a couple of years ago (2001), two members of the Harvard University Graduate School of Education brought out a book snappily entitled "How the Way We Talk can Change the Way we Work". It's an excellent book but it was a little strange to see it referred to by some critics as "new", and an example of "breakthrough thinking".
Why?
Because although the two books are not addressing *exactly* the same area, Ms Charvet's "Words that Change Minds", first published in 1996, can readily be seen as a precursor to the later book.
Although it is usually referred to in connection with Rodger Bailey's LAB Profile work, this book is in fact based on a subset of the "meta programs", or mental filters, first identified by Leslie Lebeau (formerly Leslie Cameron-Bandler).
What makes this book so valuable is that instead of simply describing the meta programs on a purely theoretical level (as many previous authors had done), Ms Charvet places each one in a very practical context. She tells us not only the basics of each meta program but also such practical details as:
- what questions to use to elicit a person's position on any of the meta programs discussed
- how to identify what meta program positions are best suited to a given job
- and how to frame a job or product advert so that it "speaks to" the optimum audience
There is also a wealth of anecdotes from real life that illustrate the meta programs at work - like why the US was never comfortable as members of UNESCO, why a single word undermined one of IBM's big advertising campaigns, and why a Jewish mother might recommend chicken soup because "it couldn't hurt".
And on top of all that, the book is written in an enthusiastic, flowing style that makes reading it both easy and enjoyable.
Highly recommended for *anyone* who wants to understand the practicalities of how language works.
0Comment| 121 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
This book presents meta-programs (the content-free filters we use to make up our model of the world) in a simple, understandable and highly readable way. It's based on the Language and Behaviour (LAB) Profile developed by Rodger Bailey - a simplification of the original 60 (!) meta-programs down to 14, along with the questions you can use to elicit them. This is a kind of psychometric test, although as people may have different meta-programs in different contexts, and they may change over time, it's not about pigeonholing people.
Shelle also tells you the kind of language to use to reach particular kinds of people - useful in sales, negotiation, motivation and deciding who to hire for a particular job. The book is chatty with a good sense of humour.
0Comment| 61 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 26 November 2003
This book can be useful for a range of professionals; from sales representatives, to clinical therapists. Mostly though, it can be incredibly helpful for Human Resource Managers during the selection and recruitment process. Don't expect huge insights to the workings of the human mind; rather a clear explanation on how what we say can be used to predict patterns of behaviour particularly in the working environment. An easy read, but not for everybody.
0Comment| 34 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
VINE VOICEon 7 November 2000
There is a well-known statistc going around which says that only 7% of a message is in the verbal content, 38% is in the vocalisation (tone, tempo, etc.) and 55% is in the body language. This might seem to imply that it doesn't really matter what words you use as long as they are more or less appropriate.
No such luck.
These statistics only apply when there is conflict between what you say and the way you say it (like saying "yes" whilst shaking your head to signal "no"). In the rest of your face-to-face communications - when you *aren't* mismatching your signals - it is actually very important that you choose your words with as much precision as possible - and this book shows you how to do just that.

In the early days of NLP, Leslie Cameron-Bandler developed what are known as the Meta Programs - Proactive/Reactive, Towards/Away From, etc. From a high of around 60, the number of active meta programs has now been halved. Rodger Bailey has identified just 13 of these which are particularly relevant to business communications, and these have become the basis for his 'LAB Profile' and what he calls 'Influencing Language'.
In this book Shelle Rose Charvet does an excellent job of describing the basic features of the LAB Profile (i.e. how to determine a person's current status in each of the 13 meta programs) and how to communicate more effectively by using the corresponding language patterns.

When I reviewed the first edition of this book I was greatly impressed, with only one significant reservation. That qualification has been cleared up in the 2nd edition, and new material has been added. The result is a book that every student of human communications needs to have on their shelf, not just to read it the once, but as a valuable reference work you'll go back to time and time again.
0Comment| 93 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 19 January 2008
I've only given this book four stars as although it is a really valuable and really useful book that is packed with practical techniques and knowledge, it is not, unfortunately, written in a very accessable style or for someone without a good grounding in NLP.

This is really a book for the experienced NLP practitioner which is a shame because the ideas in it deserve to be available to a much less restricted readership.

NLP for Dummies and Cognitive Behavioural Therapy for Dummies are both excellent books so here is my plea to Shelle Rose Charvet; please write a book called "Words that change minds for Dummies" - now that would be a book I would give five stars to.
0Comment| 20 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 30 July 1999
This book presents meta-programs (the content-free filters we use to make up our model of the world) in a simple, understandable and highly readable way. It's based on the Language and Behaviour (LAB) Profile developed by Rodger Bailey - a simplification of the original 60 (!) meta-programs down to 14, along with the questions you can use to elicit them. This is a kind of psychometric test, although as people may have different meta-programs in different contexts, and they may change over time, it's not about pigeonholing people. Shelle also tells you the kind of language to use to reach particular kinds of people - useful in sales, negotiation, motivation and deciding who to hire for a particular job. The book is chatty with a good sense of humour. As an NLP trainer I recommend it!
0Comment| 23 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 11 November 2010
Like a lot of NLP, from which this thinking springs, meta-programs are not well researched, so the evidence base for this book is weak. However, it makes good sense and certainly seems to work in practice. The ideas feel right, so I will label this as common sense. Why does it work. Possibly through the Forer effect or, more likely because the model forces us to listen carefully to the other person and pay them attention, the Hawthorne effect. Either way, its a useful read for NLP fans and anyone who wants to improve their communication. As with all of NLP, it costs little to try it and, if it doesn't work for you... drop it and move on.
Mike Clayton, author of Brilliant Influence: What the Most Influential People Know, Do and Say
0Comment| 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse

Sponsored Links

  (What is this?)