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Word Gets Around [CASSETTE]

4.7 out of 5 stars 121 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Audio Cassette (28 Oct. 1997)
  • Label: Bmg Music
  • ASIN: B000005CEF
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  Audio Cassette  |  Vinyl  |  MP3 Download
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (121 customer reviews)
  • Sample this album Artist (Sample)
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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Audio CD
If you're new to the Stereophonics, you may not have heard their debut. They didn't get huge until 'The Bartender and the Thief' came out. If you haven't heard it, I wouldn't hesitate to recommend it as its by far their best album.
Its quite a raw and rocky sound, but the phonics have never been able to match the raw energy of this album. The songwriting is open and honest and guitars loud. Anyone who saw Live8 will testify that 'Local Boy in the Photograph' went down a storm and thats the kind of album this is.
If you've ever liked a Stereophonics tune and you don't have this buy it now.
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By A Customer on 27 Sept. 2000
Format: Audio CD
These Cwmwman boys prove that Wales isn't all choir boys and Tom Jones! Vocalist and Lead Guitarist, Kelly Jones penned the lyrics for this album whilst he worked on a fruit and veg store in his home town, overhearing conversations and observing people from all walks of life passing by. The grittiness of the lyrics combined with Kelly's gruff vocals are truly amazing - but it's not all indie/rock. The album is a fine mix of up-tempo and slow-tempo songs, 'Tramps Vest' will have you jumping up and down but if you want something more mellow 'Traffic' has to be one of the best Rock Ballads of all time. It's one of those albums where it is hard to pick a favourite song because they are all so damn good - so add this album to your collection, you definately won't regret it.
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Format: Audio CD
To really appreciate the Stereophonics, you need to listen to their later albums, fall in love with them and then come back to their roots. It's not that the later albums are bad, just that this album is very, very good, and the band change where they're coming from over time.
If you listen to this first, you'll expect them to always be highly-energetic and insightful rock. But they change, Kelly Jones maturing and writing more about immediate personal experiences (such as the last, very sad tracks of "You Gotta Go There To Come Back", full of regrets). Here, he's writing from a younger perspective, but in tracks like "Billy Daveys Daughter", you can see the sheer poetic and empathic talent of the man.
If you *DO* come to this album from the later ones, stick with it: it will grow on you. If you go forward, don't expect them to write the same material; they don't. That's why the Stereophonics are one of the greatest bands of our time. Take them for what they are: very, very good.
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By A Customer on 12 Jan. 2005
Format: Audio CD
When i purchased this album it took me about a year before i got round to listening to it. I simply put them down as another band on the post-britpop bandwagon that would simply sound like everybody else. All i can do now is apologise as i realised after finally giving it the time of day that this album is simply, a cut above the rest in terms of what was being released then and now.
Every track is phenominal, kelly jones' voice so distinctive yet brilliant, and the whole album contains a power and aggression that neither of their next 3 albums was able to match. I will always and forever put this album in my top 3 of all time just on the basis that there really is not a bad song on it.
There are so many reviews out there that blow smoke up average bands releasing mediocore albums but please do not even dare to class this as one of them considering i'm probably the most sceptical person on the planet in terms of music.
All i will you leave you with is how the hell this album didn't make the phonics the biggest rock band on the planet will forever remain a mystery to me!
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By A Customer on 2 Sept. 2001
Format: Audio CD
This collection of songs is undoubtedly one of the greatest compilations of inventive guitar based songs. Every track on this recording has feeling, power, and emotion in the lyrics backed up by some of the most original sounds in recent years. This album should have been heralded a classic and the 'Phonics forever immortalised but unfortunately most people only started noticing after Performance and Cocktails (another great album) Listen to songs such as Traffic and Billy Davy's and you'll realise how slow ballads should be written.. And what can i say about all the rest How about awesome! I'm leaving the best to last though as i don't think there's ever been a better song written than Same Sized Feet which is absolutely spectacular as are the last three songs on the album. If you don't already own it...buy it...NOW!!!!
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Format: Audio CD
Redemption at last. Every new Stereophonics album has enhanced their popularity and sales, while the actual content has sharply declined in quality. Tired third album Just Enough Education To Perform (2001) led to them being hailed as one of Britain's biggest bands, with the UK top 5 success of singles 'Mr Writer', 'Have A Nice Day' and the sensitive cover of Rod Stewart's 'Handbags and Gladrags'. Apart from the quality of a few tracks, Just Enough Education... was an exceptionally poor output from a band who proved their worth on this dazzling rockfest. Second album Performance and Cocktails (1999) was initially held as their best, most accessible collection to date - but recent opinion has shifted considerably. Although accomplished in its own right and an admirable sister album to the debut, Performance and Cocktails is firmly overshadowed by the enduring appeal of Word Gets Around, which holds all the unpretentious components that make The Stereophonics one of Britain's best bands of the last decade.
Just Enough Education... did what so many British bands have been tempted to do: to deliberately 'Americanize' their style to tap into the lucrative market across the lake. So it was successful for Bowie - what then? Name-checking San Francisco and being the latest to ponder Kennedy's assassination does not good music make, as the 'Phonics have found to their dismay. Word Gets Around's success bred on regional nostalgia for their small town Welsh home, with profound yet hardly world-changing local incidents the themes. One can't help but feel the grief of Billy Davey as 'Phonics lead singer Kelly Jones chronicles his daughter's tragic death (in 'Billy Daveys Daughter'): it is hardly on the same worldwide level as Kennedy's death, and so much the better.
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