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The Woman Who Saved the Children: A Biography Of Eglantyne Jebb: Founder Of Save The Children Paperback – 1 Mar 2010

4.4 out of 5 stars 23 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Paperback: 432 pages
  • Publisher: Oneworld Publications; 1st edition (1 Mar. 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 185168722X
  • ISBN-13: 978-1851687220
  • Product Dimensions: 13.2 x 3 x 20.3 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (23 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 294,797 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

"This biography of Eglantyne Jebb, who established the charity to look after children in the chaos that followed the end of the First World War, brings to life a charismatic woman who changed the way the world treats children." (Waterstone's Books Quarterly)

"Unusual and perceptive... all credit to Clare Mulley, a past winner of the Daily Mail Biographers' Club prize." (Daily Mail)

"A valuable account of a forgotten life." (The Sunday Times)

"A fascinating new book." (Western Mail Series)

"A most interesting account of a life full of colour and curiosity" (Bury Free Press series)

"Admirably researched...Clare Mulley has done Eglantyne proud. Her informative and sensitively written biography will put SCF's founder, and through her SCF itself, well and truly on the global map." (Church Times)

"An interesting biography of a fascinating person who deserves to be better known and appreciated for her work." (Oxford Times)

"Crisp, masterly biography." (The Good Book Guide)

"A very readable story which will strike a chord for many." (The Times online)

"A pleasure to read... a combination of Jebb's own mischievous attitude and Mulley's lively style." (The Times Literary Supplement)

"Meticulously researched... a testimony to Jebb's remarkable humanitarianism." (Oxford Today)

'Meticulously researched... a testimony to Jebb's remarkable humanitarianism.' (Oxford Today)

"A very good read, telling an extraordinary story." (The Guardian)

Review

"(An) unusual and perceptive biography" --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
This is a thoughtful and interesting biography of a wonderful woman who achieved wonderful things. Eglantyne Jebb, a name I had never come across before is most famous for founding the now well loved and internationally recognised charity, Save the Children, a charity which does so much good in the world I could not do it justice in a short paragraph. So it is fantastic that Clare Mulley, in her debut biography, has paid homage to this remarkable champion of children's rights.

Eglantyne herself was almost unbelievable. In an age where war and women's rights should have been enough to occupy the cares and worries of this woman, she selflessly devoted her efforts to raising awareness of the situation of deprived children and changing ingrained attitudes to children's rights.

But alongside a saintly career saving the children, Eglantyne was also a fascinating person. She actually was fairly rude about children, `I don't care for children' she said in 1900 and Mulley revels in her reference to children as `little wretches'. Eglantyne never had any children of her own. She was in love with Marcus Dimsdale, the sixth son of Baron Dimsdale, but he married Elsbeth Philipps in 1902. She then had a passionate affair with a woman, Margaret Hill nee Keynes.

Eglantyne is an extraordinary woman and Clare Mulley had done a fantastic job conveying that to the reader. I would recommend this book to anyone with an interest in charities or children's rights, with a love of good biography, or with even an ounce of feminist pride. This was one amazing lady.
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Format: Paperback
It is a shame, as Clare Mulley writes, that Eglantyne Jebb is all but forgotten today. She deserves more than this. She deserves our recognition, our admiration and our thanks. In the aftermath of World War One Eglantyne was the champion of the children. She helped to save the lives of millions of children in Europe and Russia who were left starving in the wake of one of the worst wars in history. It is unfathomable how she had the determination and the strength of character to do this, and yet she did, and in an age where women were struggling for their own rights and trying to make their own voices heard, let alone the rights of children.
Clare Mulley has a delightful and sophisticated style and a flair for writing which prevents this biography from becoming dry or repetitive. Arguably she has a fantastic subject for the job, yet praise must be bestowed on Mulley for this enthralling book, which at last does justice to a woman who changed national and international attitudes to child protection and founded one of the greatest children's charities in the world. A first-rate read and highly recommended.
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Format: Paperback
Clare Mulley's captivating and excellently researched biography is a pleasure to read. With all the over-hashed books on historical figures in the 19th and 20th century, like Queen Victoria, Churchill or Stalin, it is always refreshing to read a biography of someone unsung; someone whose story has not be told and retold into tedium.
Eglantyne Jebb is a woman whose life and work immediately enthralled me. Why did such a beautiful, striking woman never marry? Why did she not want children yet ploughed all her energies into improving the conditions and rights of the young? Eglantyne Jebb is a forgotten national treasure, a pioneer of the early 20th century. She founded Save the Children, now a charitable phenomenon and a life force for hundreds of underprivileged children. She secured one of the most successful UN charters ever introduced, the Convention on the Rights of the Child. She was also interesting on a human level. She had great and tragic love affairs, very real character flaws, and, in my opinion, an understandable aversion to having children of her own... "the little wretches".
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Format: Hardcover
I have an almost insatiable appetite for biographies but that causes me a problem: I tend to have several on the go at once. Once I get my head around the fact that John Major probably never did sing No Woman No Cry and that Ken Livingstone was never in the Goon Show I get by:-)

I can't easily just stick to one book at a time or even one in one evening. Until I started reading my now well thumbed copy of The Woman who Saved the Children, Clare Mulley's biography of Eglantyne Jebb. I think I've read it for four nights in a row and that's saying something for me!

How do you get the balance right between creating a piece of historical record and offering an insight into someone's true character, with getting the pace and readability right along with some humour? Clare has succeeded and I really am growing to be quite fond of Eglantyne. If I had met her I feel sure that I would have liked her, admired her and maybe even been attracted to her. I do hope though that I would have argued with her a little - or, preferably, a lot.

It's a great read that unravels a fairly convoluted journey in an age when women had enough challenges without changing the world's attitude to how we treat children. The book weaves the simple points with the high level details beautifully, and works as either a straightforward charming read or as an important record of a world changing chunk of social history.
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