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The Woman Racket by [Moxon, Steve]
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The Woman Racket Kindle Edition

4.4 out of 5 stars 15 customer reviews

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Length: 311 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
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Review

"The Woman Racket will fascinate you as it teaches you how social scientists have gotten it wrong and how feminists have gotten it backwards. The Woman Racket is an extraordinarily thoughtful, erudite, well-researched, politically incorrect and courageous journey into why men are the way they are--and why women are the way they are. If you're a student of men and women, prepare to become a scholar; if you are involved in social services or social policy, prepare to become a pioneer."--Warren Farrell, PhD, author, The Myth of Male Power and Why Men Are the Way They Are

"No one book can be expected to reverse this tsunami of idiocy, but Steve Moxon's The Woman Racket may keep some heads above water. Despite a contentious title, it plays fair and will utterly persuade the objective reader ... Racket is full of surprises ... The book breathes energy, intelligence, and what Bertrand Russell called a robust sense of reality."--Michael Levin

"The sex war is over, and no-one has won. Mind you, the Woman Racket may lead to a resumption of hostilities."--Iain Macwhirter

"Steve Moxon s book, The Woman Racket, has certainly taken the UK men s movement, and perhaps even the world s men s movement, by storm." "The Woman Racket transcends its flaws, densely packed as it is with deep, original analysis even of relatively well-known information, as well as much new, relatively well-founded information.From the opening page, we know we are in for a treat: "The book is not without its shortcomings. Moxon s reference at the start of chapter two to the profound insight to which he asserts his books will lead is both premature and annoying self-aggrandizing."Moxon is, by turns, boring, irrelevant, annoying, and brilliant--Steven Svoboda"

"The Woman Racket will fascinate you as it teaches you how social scientists have gotten it wrong and how feminists have gotten it backwards. The Woman Racket is an extraordinarily thoughtful, erudite, well-researched, politically incorrect and courageous journey into why men are the way they are--and why women are the way they are. If you're a student of men and women, prepare to become a scholar; if you are involved in social services or social policy, prepare to become a pioneer."--Warren Farrell, PhD, author, The Myth of Male Power and Why Men Are the Way They Are

"The sex war is over, and no-one has won. Mind you, the Woman Racket may lead to a resumption of hostilities."--Iain Macwhirter "Sunday Herald "

"No one book can be expected to reverse this tsunami of idiocy, but Steve Moxon's The Woman Racket may keep some heads above water. Despite a contentious title, it plays fair and will utterly persuade the objective reader ... Racket is full of surprises ... The book breathes energy, intelligence, and what Bertrand Russell called a robust sense of reality."--Michael Levin "The Quarterly Review "

"Steve Moxon's book, The Woman Racket, has certainly taken the UK men s movement, and perhaps even the world s men s movement, by storm... The Woman Racket transcends its flaws, densely packed as it is with deep, original analysis even of relatively well-known information, as well as much new, relatively well-founded information. From the opening page, we know we are in for a treat... The book is not without its shortcomings. Moxon s reference at the start of chapter two to the 'profound insight' to which he asserts his books will lead is both premature and annoying self-aggrandizing... Moxon is, by turns, boring, irrelevant, annoying, and brilliant."--Steven Svoboda"

Review

"The Woman Racket will fascinate you as it teaches you how social scientists have gotten it wrong and how feminists have gotten it backwards. The Woman Racket is an extraordinarily thoughtful, erudite, well-researched, politically incorrect and courageous journey into why men are the way they are--and why women are the way they are. If you're a student of men and women, prepare to become a scholar; if you are involved in social services or social policy, prepare to become a pioneer."

(Warren Farrell, PhD, author, The Myth of Male Power and Why Men Are the Way They Are)

"No one book can be expected to reverse this tsunami of idiocy, but Steve Moxon's The Woman Racket may keep some heads above water. Despite a contentious title, it plays fair and will utterly persuade the objective reader ... Racket is full of surprises ... The book breathes energy, intelligence, and what Bertrand Russell called a robust sense of reality."

(Michael Levin The Quarterly Review)

"The sex war is over, and no-one has won. Mind you, the Woman Racket may lead to a resumption of hostilities."

(Iain Macwhirter Sunday Herald)

"Steve Moxon's book, The Woman Racket, has certainly taken the UK men’s movement, and perhaps even the world’s men’s movement, by storm... The Woman Racket transcends its flaws, densely packed as it is with deep, original analysis even of relatively well-known information, as well as much new, relatively well-founded information. From the opening page, we know we are in for a treat... The book is not without its shortcomings. Moxon’s reference at the start of chapter two to the 'profound insight' to which he asserts his books will lead is both premature and annoying self-aggrandizing... Moxon is, by turns, boring, irrelevant, annoying, and brilliant."

(Steven Svoboda)

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 7671 KB
  • Print Length: 311 pages
  • Page Numbers Source ISBN: 1845401506
  • Publisher: Imprint Academic (10 Aug. 2012)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B008VRTZI2
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars 15 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #501,549 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

By Charles VINE VOICE on 8 Sept. 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Moxon claims early on that 'the rest of this book is about science'. It's not really, and it's a strange statement to make. Certainly there is science, but there's much else. I actually found the initial science section a little chewy, although not as hard going as the last-but-one chapter on fathers' rights. In fact the whole book can be quite tough, its relentless onslaught of statistics, very strong opinions and an angry - almost hurt - tone making it a little wearing.

But there is much good here and it's refreshing that Moxon has been brave enough to say a lot of these things. Frequently I thought 'crikey pal, I'm glad it's you, not me, saying these things!' I do fear, though, that his sources are very selective, and there are some statements which do make your jaw drop. It's a pity the author doesn't have a tad more levity, a tad more humour, for it would have made this a more accessible and convincing book.

I fear I'm dwelling on negatives too much but I have to say there is one very poor chapter in which Moxon discusses the merits of female songwriters and laughably comes to the conclusion that the only good one is Joni Mitchell! At another point he makes rather bitchy comments about Mrs Beckham, Posh Spice. There's also an awful photograph of Moxon on the back alongside the words 'Steve Moxon has gained a reputation for foresight'. Don't do it, Steve! It makes the book look so amateurish.

Chapters on pornography, rape and prostitution are very interesting and say much that the mass media is too polite/PC/ignorant to tell you. For them alone I'd recommend this.
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Format: Paperback
Steve Moxon's expose of feminism as an agent of male demonization and oppression succeeds in large part, despite of itself. Misandry is Western society's biggest cultural and legal problem.

Moxon asserts the premise of evolutionary biology and psychology - that human beings' basic behaviours are hard wired, and that there is a natural set of preferences for women and against men. Men are very supportive of these prejudices, and as a whole, have accepted the feminism, hook line and sinker. These have been totally misunderstood, especially by feminists - who say they believe in equality and the 'blank slate' but act as if all men are demons. 'The patriarchy' is not only a myth, but a feminist projection of their own sexes ability to unify (men always compete and co-operate only in certain circumstances) and dictate how society should behave.

In fact, feminists have not pursued equality, but instead have pursued a hardened set of preferences for women in all walks of life that not only blames men, but actively discriminates, humiliates and even kills them to serve their purposes. Moxon pursues this to explain how women got the vote, why men get shafted over healthcare, employment, domestic violence, rape, prostitution, pornography, and of course, divorce and family law.

When Moxon draws upon facts, he makes his case well. But there are times when he veers into subjectivity. For example, Moxon points to research that shows how men are more likely to be geniuses and morons, and how women cluster around mediocrity. To illustrate his point, he uses modern songwriters as an example. For him, the only song writing genius to emerge from the last 50 years is Joni Mitchell - no one else compares with the many male song writing geniuses.
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Read this book, because it is good, informative as far as you trust it, economical and thought provoking, but:

This book makes much of its basis in science, and is heavily referenced. No doubt it is well-founded but as it wears on it becomes more polemical and a little bitter. I found myself wondering whether the author were a Father4Justice. Not that it would invalidate the book; in fact it appears he is involved in "Mankind' - a charity concerned with domestic violence against men; its website has references to research held by the Home Office (lots of British Crime Survey.)

The early material about women as the limiting factor in reproduction with the Y chromosome (i.e. men) as genetic filter is fascinating, and something I'd not heard about.

Of course this book is not a primary work of science, but a referenced digest. However I think especially in the later chapters there is a tendency to career past factual/scientific evidence into rant and polemic (as Damaskcat points out too.) Do not be put off - read this book; but look too at "The Myth of Male Power", by Warren Farrell. Although indigestibly American in presentation, and also now quite old, it probably has more fact and reference.

What are these books for? I think they are trying to say that feminism is generally unopposed (even consented to - because that's what men do) and has much that is damaging alongside the essential and positive, and that therefore opposition, fact and clarity are necessary, so that feminism should mature. Is it the case that feminism has matured? Are there feminists who are "out of control"? Is some such feminism official policy and/or general societal attitude (for example, premeditated homicide as involuntary and not culpable?
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