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The Wolf of Wall Street - Limited Edition Steelbook [Blu-ray] [2013] [Region Free]

4.0 out of 5 stars 1,394 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Actors: Leonardo DiCaprio, Jonah Hill, Matthew McConaughey, Jon Favreau, Jean Dujardin
  • Directors: Martin Scorsese
  • Format: Blu-ray
  • Language: English
  • Subtitles: English
  • Subtitles For The Hearing Impaired: English
  • Region: All Regions (Read more about DVD/Blu-ray formats.)
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Classification: 18
  • Studio: Universal Pictures UK
  • DVD Release Date: 19 May 2014
  • Run Time: 179 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1,394 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 45,493 in DVD & Blu-ray (See Top 100 in DVD & Blu-ray)

Product Description

Revered filmmaker Martin Scorsese directs the true story of New York stockbroker Jordan Belfort (Leonardo DiCaprio). From the American dream to corporate greed, Belfort goes from penny stocks and righteousness to IPOs and a life of corruption in the late 80s. Excess success and affluence in his early twenties as founder of the brokerage firm Stratton Oakmont warranted Belfort the title – “The Wolf of Wall Street.”

Money. Power. Women. Drugs. Temptations were for the taking and the threat of authority was irrelevant. For Jordan and his wolf pack, modesty was quickly deemed overrated and more was never enough.

Extra Features

  • The Wolf Pack - behind-the-scenes and the making of The Wolf of Wall Street
  • Running Wild - the process of getting the film made
  • The Wolf of Wall Street Round Table - Marty, Leo, Jonas and Terrence discussing the film in New York

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Blu-ray
I enjoyed The Wolf of Wall Street. I'm not convinced it's up there with the best of Scorsese but for a 3 hour movie it flew past in a whirlwind of excess and was certainly never dull.

It's based on the memoir of Jordan Belfort about his sky highs and depraved lows as a stock broker on Wall Street in the 1990's. It may be a lazy comparison but the film shares much with Goodfellas in terms of story arch and structure - Belforts rise and rise to become The Wolf and the inevitable crash and burn that must follow.

Leonardo DiCaprio of course plays Belfort and puts in another cracking performances, narrating and anchoring the tale in a similar fashion to Ray Liotta/Henry Hill from that previous Scorsese classic. There's great support elsewhere from Jonah Hill and a whole raft of familiar faces including a memorable cameo from Matthew Mcconaughey. It's all ably directed by Martin Scorsese, bringing the stylistic flourishes you'd expect, perhaps the main reason it all flies past so breezily.

Admittedly it's probably not going to be to everyone's taste - while there's not much violence of any description, there's a huge amount of bad language, shed loads of nudity, copious drug use and a distinct lack of a moral compass. Pretty much how I imagined Wall Street in the 80's and 90's to be honest.
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Format: Blu-ray Verified Purchase
An adaptation of Jordan Belfort's memoir chronicling his rise and fall on Wall Street and his hard-partying, addiction-fuelled personal life.

Welcome to Martin Scorsese’s 22nd feature film, another of his examinations of the rites and rituals of a particular sect, be it the wiseguys of ‘70s Little Italy ( Mean Streets ) or the society scions of late 19th-Century New York ( The Age Of Innocence ).

With its rise-and-fall arc, its hedonism and hubris, its gleeful exploration of the dark side of the America Dream, its money, crime and narcs, its sex, drugs and rock’n’roll (though the soundtrack also takes in Madness, Simon & Garfunkel and a fair bit of Euro pop), The Wolf Of Wall Street forms a loose trilogy with GoodFellas and Casino. And if it can’t quite match the energy and quality of those classics, it nonetheless stands as Scorsese’s finest for 15 years.

When we first meet Jordan Belfort, he’s more pup than wolf, his lowest-rung job at L.F. Rothschild requiring him only to “smile and dial”. A first-day lunch with big boss Mark Hanna (Matthew McConaughey, hilarious) sows the seeds of the chaos to come, though: Hanna advises him that the stock market is “all fugazi” while preaching the worthlessness of morals and the necessity of greed, cocaine and, to stay relaxed, jerking off twice daily. Then, on 19 October, 1987, the very day Jordan becomes a licensed broker, the market crashes and Rothschild goes under.

Jordan joins a penny-stocks firm in Long Island, employing a bunch of expert salesmen (mainly weed) from his old Queens neighbourhood and making Donnie Azoff (Jonah Hill, terrific) VP despite his phosphorescent teeth and shoulder-slung pastel sweaters.
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By Jules TOP 1000 REVIEWER on 22 Oct. 2014
Format: DVD
Based on the real life memoir of Jordan Belfort, we follow the rise of this young, hungry stockbroker (DiCaprio) who learns the quick way to the top unscrupulously. From living on the poverty line, to living a lavish life of wild parties, drugs, sex, fast cars & his inevitable downfall by the FBI.

The Wolf of Wall Street's almost 3 hour run time is an excessive charting of the eccentric people Belfort comes into contact with or surrounded by in the industry, that indeed he himself soon turns into an equally eccentric, unrecognizable person from that young, hungry stockbroker he started out as. Initially for the first hour it is an interesting journey of rags to riches with a little skirting of the law & bad boy behavior. As the next hour & 45 minutes delves deep into the greed & mass excess lifestyle of drug addiction, sex addiction, relationship implosion & FBI/SEC agencies coming knocking as things spiral out of control. This movie isn't a serious dramatic offering like 1987's Wall Street but instead a satire with a mixture of silly & subtle comedy styles spread through the film. The comedy scenes with DiCaprio & Jonah Hill in particular were the ones that i enjoyed the most. The satirize approach means the drug addiction & sexual content goes way over the top, from snorting cocaine from hookers bottoms, to mass orgies etc... with little time passing without scenes of one or the other & F-bombs every other word. Indeed it is more a film about focusing on the excess & greed , than it is a film with characters you actually care about or follow much in the way of development after the first hour.
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Format: DVD
"The Wolf of Wall Street" is an overly long black comedy about a crooked Wall Street broker who makes his fortune in the 1990's. The lead role is played with gusto by Leonardo DiCaprio who seems to have subscribed to the Jack Nicholson school of acting.

The whole movie is so completely over the top with a large amount of foul language, sexual depravity, drug abuse and general bad behaviour that it is hard to believe that it is supposedly based on a true story. Its this outrageous behaviour that gives the movie its best moments though as you can't help but laugh at the hedonism on display.

Unfortunately though for most people with any sense of morality the characters portrayed in the movie are a group of the most unlikeable, unethical, greedy and dispicable people you can possibly imagine. If you consider that people like these were responsible for the worlds financial difficulties in the new millenium you wonder who it is you are supposed to empathise with. There are many similar movies dealing with the rise and fall of drug dealers, and it seems that anti-heroes are popular with cinema audiences at the moment. I found it difficult though to sit through a three hour long movie where all the main characters were scumbags and there seemed to be little moral judgement of their behaviour.

"The Wolf of Wall Street" has its moments, but it is far from being a classic Scorsese movie. The film never convincingly feels like it is set in the 80's and 90's and while they obviously had fun filming it I noticed a large number of continuity errors between shots which was surprising for such an experienced director. You can't help but compare this movie to the old Michael Douglas film "Wall Street" of which it seems to be an updated, more exagerrated version but one with a lot less charm.
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