Buy Used
£1.82
+ £2.80 UK delivery
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Former Library books. Shows some signs of wear, and may have some markings on the inside. 100% Money Back Guarantee. Shipped to over one million happy customers.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Wolf and the Crown Paperback – 1 Sep 1998

4.3 out of 5 stars 4 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
£47.69 £1.82
click to open popover

Special Offers and Product Promotions

Enter your mobile number below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.
Getting the download link through email is temporarily not available. Please check back later.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.




Product details

  • Paperback: 326 pages
  • Publisher: HarperCollins (Sept. 1998)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0061053708
  • ISBN-13: 978-0061053702
  • Product Dimensions: 15.6 x 2.2 x 23.5 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,333,074 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Synopsis

A tale of myth and magic in which the young Arthor must fight to keep hold of his new crown and his realm from being taken by the ravenous wolves, both human and otherworldly, who are threatening Britain. From the author of CENTURIES, THE DARK SHORE and THE SHADOW EATER.

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
5 star
3
4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
1
1 star
0
See all 4 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

By A Customer on 8 Jan. 1999
Format: Paperback
I've been reading the series by Attanasio, and I have not been disappointed. His rendition of the Arthor legend is absolutely incredible. His use of science as the mechanism behind the myth is brilliant, but he doesn't allow that brilliance to overshadow the fact that there is a greater intelligence at work in the universe: God. I love the series, and I am anxiously awaiting the book to follow "The Wolf and the Crown." Please keep me posted.
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
The third book in AA Attanasio's fabulous telling of the King Arthor myths, the Wolf and the Crown follows the young king through the first year of his reign. He must prove to his subjects that he is a worthy king, and must prove to himself that he is a good man even though he fell prey to his witchy half sister's seductions. This book, as all of Attanasio's, is very different from its predecessors. The chapters are short, perfect two-page cliff hangers that whirl the reader between the various characters and situations. In some ways, this book is much more horrific than the ones that came before, but it is leavened with great humor. It focuses on Arthor's humanity, but has the elements of the strange and magical we've come to expect from Mr. Attanasio. Gods old and new, ghosts, witches, demons, angels, vampires, dwarves, a monkey, elves, stolen and misplaced souls, the hell that is our present day, the fabulous world tree that is the magnetic field surrounding the earth, the hollow hills above the dragon at the heart of the earth, heroic adventure, and selfless sacrifice, it is all there weaving a tapestry of magic and realism. Attanasio is not bound by any of the old tellings of this myth, he takes the characters and elements and makes them uniquely believable, uniquely his own. As in many of Attanasio's books, such as his fantastic first novel Radix and the rare The Moon's Wife, the heros are flawed by their own humanity and must take on painful journeys of self-discovery and change. Don't miss this book, I can't wait for the next ones. I hope he follows the King to Avalon and on, to that far future day of need that is predicted for the King's return.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
This is A. A. Attanasio's third book in a truly unique retelling of the legend of Arthur (or Arthor in this case). Attanasio brings to this new interpretation all the tools at his considerable disposal and they are extremely well used. This series is a slight departure in form in several ways from much of his earlier works since it is meant to be read as a whole; the books in the series draw heavily one upon the other and to read the second and third without the first is to do the series and yourself a terrible injustice... Some may be a bit confused at this unfamiliarity, but it is a result of a thorough attention to detail and the fantastic imagination which readers of Attanasio have come to expect. The series is not a string of stand alone books - it is a real multi-book epic. The plot of this, the third book in this Arthurian series, takes Arthor to the age of budding manhood. So far the boy king has been exactly that - a boy king who has been a lowly servant all his life, with all of the limitations which his lack of age, experience and aspirations would give him in such extraordinary circumstances. But, Arthor is only really a small part of this saga. The story is infinitely more complex than it's "main" figure. Attanasio has again pushed the limits, but this time in the realm of fantasy rather than sci-fi. Those who are looking for the phenomenal leaps of imagination and the amazing worlds which his sci-fi displays like no other's, will perhaps find this a bit sedate, but it is written with a very different intent and should not be judged in the same way as a work from the sci-fi genre.Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
By A Customer on 17 July 1998
Format: Paperback
I was disappointed to find almost none of the elements in the third installment of Attanasio's treatment of the Arthur cycle that I have read his other books for--it seemed to me that he was out of ideas, hurrying to meet a deadline, or both. The plot was rushed, the usual musical descriptions were all but absent, and there were no significant developments in the story at all. I hope that there will be a fourth volume that is as complex and lush as "The Dragon and The Unicorn," much as "Last Legends of Earth" was a worthy follow-up to "Radix" after the tepid "In Other Worlds" and "Arc of the Dream."
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: HASH(0x8f4a9660) out of 5 stars 13 reviews
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0x8f4bd1f8) out of 5 stars A terrible disappointment. 16 April 1999
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Attanasio is one of my favorite writers - constantly innovative, frequently lyrical, and until this book he hadn't disappointed me. It's not a bad story, but it falls far below the standard of work that I've come to expect from this man. The first two books in this series are delightful, and as good as anything Attanasio's ever done. I finished this one, however, only to keep up with the series. Rerad this book if you've been drawn into the series, but by no means let it be your introduction to the work of this talented author.
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0x8f4bd660) out of 5 stars Fantastic, not-to-be-missed! 27 Nov. 1998
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
The third book in AA Attanasio's fabulous telling of the King Arthor myths, the Wolf and the Crown follows the young king through the first year of his reign. He must prove to his subjects that he is a worthy king, and must prove to himself that he is a good man even though he fell prey to his witchy half sister's seductions. This book, as all of Attanasio's, is very different from its predecessors. The chapters are short, perfect two-page cliff hangers that whirl the reader between the various characters and situations. In some ways, this book is much more horrific than the ones that came before, but it is leavened with great humor. It focuses on Arthor's humanity, but has the elements of the strange and magical we've come to expect from Mr. Attanasio. Gods old and new, ghosts, witches, demons, angels, vampires, dwarves, a monkey, elves, stolen and misplaced souls, the hell that is our present day, the fabulous world tree that is the magnetic field surrounding the earth, the hollow hills above the dragon at the heart of the earth, heroic adventure, and selfless sacrifice, it is all there weaving a tapestry of magic and realism. Attanasio is not bound by any of the old tellings of this myth, he takes the characters and elements and makes them uniquely believable, uniquely his own. As in many of Attanasio's books, such as his fantastic first novel Radix and the rare The Moon's Wife, the heros are flawed by their own humanity and must take on painful journeys of self-discovery and change. Don't miss this book, I can't wait for the next ones. I hope he follows the King to Avalon and on, to that far future day of need that is predicted for the King's return.
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0x8f4bd5dc) out of 5 stars A Departure from the First Two Books 26 April 2009
By Brian W. Spolarich - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I have had the first three books from this series on my bookshelf for a long time along with Radix and Last Legends of Earth, and couldn't remember why I didn't like this series.

Now I remember. Its this book.

The first two books are wonderfully lyrical in their writing, and full of the hallucinatory blend of quantum physics and mysticism that I think is Attanasio's trademark. This books isn't any of those things, and seems, as others have said, hurriedly written to fill a deadline.

What I find most painful is the page-and-a-half "chapters" that are the book's structure. The books winds up being just a set of vignettes, really, advancing in parallel the four or five stories that are being advanced. While this technique might be intended to keep the pace brisk, what it really does is completely distance the reader from the characters and the action. Why should I care about any of this given how I'm not invited to connect with it in a meaningful way.

Also, the "Merlin as a lisping dwarf" thing gets old real quick.

I'm slogging my way through and will buy the concluding volume just because I'm a sucker for punishment (and it seems more well-regarded than this book), but as others have said, you read this one because you like the series, not because you like this book.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0x8f4bd9a8) out of 5 stars 'Wolf...' interesting but falls short 26 Aug. 1999
By Michael Scott - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Attansio's interpretation of teh Arthurian legend is fascinating and well-written, but it took this reader nearly 100 pages to become acclimated to the author's bizarre shortened chapters. Attanasio abbeviates his scenes so that they last no longer than 1 1/2 pages at the most.
Interestingly, it doesn't appear that his work suffers because of it...yet it was still disconcerting. This was the first Attanasio book I've read. Despite what others have written, it is possible to use this as a jumping-off point into his novels.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0x8f4bd8ac) out of 5 stars A disappointment 17 July 1998
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
I was disappointed to find almost none of the elements in the third installment of Attanasio's treatment of the Arthur cycle that I have read his other books for--it seemed to me that he was out of ideas, hurrying to meet a deadline, or both. The plot was rushed, the usual musical descriptions were all but absent, and there were no significant developments in the story at all. I hope that there will be a fourth volume that is as complex and lush as "The Dragon and The Unicorn," much as "Last Legends of Earth" was a worthy follow-up to "Radix" after the tepid "In Other Worlds" and "Arc of the Dream."
Were these reviews helpful? Let us know


Feedback