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Withnail And I [Blu-ray] [1988]

4.5 out of 5 stars 396 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Actors: Richard E. Grant, Paul McGann, Richard Griffiths, Ralph Brown
  • Directors: Bruce Robinson
  • Format: Import, PAL, Widescreen
  • Language: English
  • Region: Region B/2 (Read more about DVD/Blu-ray formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 16:9 - 1.78:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Classification: 18
  • Studio: Starz Home Entertainment
  • DVD Release Date: 31 Aug. 2009
  • Run Time: 103 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (396 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B001RNXZ0G
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 69,160 in DVD & Blu-ray (See Top 100 in DVD & Blu-ray)

Product Description

Product Description

Bruce Robinson's celebrated cult comedy starring Richard E. Grant and Paul McGann. It's the end of the 1960s and two out-of-work actors, Withnail (Grant) and 'I' (McGann), subsist on a diet of booze, drugs and fags in their revolting Camden flat. In order to escape the depressing nexus of visits from their dealer and the months of untouched washing-up, they escape to the country, with the intention of getting some R and R at a cottage owned by Withnail's uncle Monty (Richard Griffiths). However, things do not exactly go as planned, Withnail being particularly unsuited to the quiet social mores of countrypeople. The pair's friendship starts to become sorely tested amid the vicissitudes of their 'holiday'. More ominously, uncle Monty appears in person seemingly with something of an eye for 'I'.

From Amazon.co.uk

Set in 1969, the year in which the hippy dreams of so many young Englishmen went sour, 1986's Bruce Robinson's Withnail and I is an enduring British cult. Fellow enthusiasts cry immortal phrases from the endlessly brilliant script to one another like mating calls; "Scrubbers!", "We want the finest wines known to humanity and we want them now!" Withnail is played by the emaciated but defiantly effete Richard E Grant, "I" (i.e., Marwood) by Paul McGann. Out-of-work actors living in desperate penury in a rancid London flat, their lives are a continual struggle to keep warm, alive and in Marwood's case sane, until the pubs open. A sojourn in the country cottage of Withnail's gay Uncle Monty only redoubles their privations--they have to kill a live chicken to eat. The arrival of Monty spells further misery for Marwood as he must fend off his attentions. This borderline homophobic interlude apart, Withnail and I is a delight, enhanced by an aimless but appallingly eventful plot. Popular among students, it strikes a chord with anyone who has undergone a period of debauchery and impoverished squalor prior to finding their way onto life's straight and narrow.--David Stubbs --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: DVD
For the 20th anniversary of this 1986 production a 3 disc set has been assembled which contains a host of extras which includes a director's commentary, a channel 4 documentary and the stunning soundtrack.

This comedy about a couple of out of work actors which stars Richard E Grant and Paul McGann set at the tail end of the 60's who escape their squalid London flat to go to on a holiday in the Lake District, the rich dialogue which contains and ever increasing amount of insults really starts to flow once all involved start drinking heavily.

This is an excellent package for a film that has a huge cult following since its release, a rare example of stunning British cinema given the re-release it deserves a must see film.
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Format: Blu-ray
This is my favourite film of all time the conversion to blu ray is good you can actually see posters and labels in the kitchen previously just a blurry mess.
What impressed me the most was the sound quality the initial music as you turn it on with a decent digital sound set up it feels like your there. I've had this film on every format and must have seen it 30 times and still probably will watch it again. Highly recommend.
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Format: DVD
Bruce Robinson's "Withnail and I" is a modern classic, beloved by its cult following, and can be rewatched so many times that most people feel the need to have a spare copy handy just in case one wears out. Indeed, if you can hold on to your copy without lending it to someone and never getting it back, you're doing better than the rest of us!
Loosely based upon his own life, this is a story of two 'resting' actors and how they try in vain to escape the festering stink-hole that is Camden Town in 1969 by having a weekend out in country. Richard E. Grant's astonishing performance as the brilliantly sarcastic, cynical and eloquent anti-hero Withnail, is counterbalanced by the aloof Marwood (better known as 'I'), from whose perspective the film is based around. Richard Griffiths amazingly camp performance as Uncle Monty is one of his greatest roles, and when thrown into the mix with the scheming Withnail and the unsuspecting 'I', it makes for one of the most fascinating menage-a-trois ever to be caught on camera. Aside from the three main characters, there isn't really many other people in the film, but they include the late Michael Elphick as a poacher (who threatens Withnail with a dead fish), Withnail's dodgy mate Danny (who invents the legendary 'Camberwell Carrot', a joint that utilises up to 12 skins) and Presuming Ed (who doesn't say anything in the film except for 'Hare Rama').
Probably the most quoted movie in British history, nearly every single line is like a sound-bite. It has also spawned the most infamous drinking game in movie history, which involves trying to keep up with Withnail's drinking throughout the movie, which in reality is actually impossible. It is the mark of how great an actor Richard E.
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Format: DVD Verified Purchase
This is a great film, as we all know, so please avoid the Studiocanal version, which is an edited version. Spend a couple of extra quid on getting the original version instead, it will be worth it. Amazon really should do much, much better with the product reviews it allows, so that it is clear what all these different offers contain. If it had I wouldn't have wasted money on buying this dud.
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Format: DVD Verified Purchase
There's not much else to add to the glowing reviews of this film which is by far the best movie I have ever seen (and I've seen quite a few) except to draw a parallel between the character of Withnail and a Shakesperian tragic hero. I know that there are students of literature out there who will baulk at the very idea but that's probably because they are too snobby to consider a film like this a work of art. But it is. I must have watched this film 50 times but I never cease to feel a cathartic chill run down my spine when Marwood says goodbye to Withnail in the end:

'I shall miss you Withnail.'
'I shall miss you too. Chin chin.'

This scene is one of the most moving I have ever seen. The drunken fool Withnail, at whom and with whom with have laughed, and who has spent the whole film not giving a toss about his friend, is suddenly and breathtakingly turned into the tragic hero he is and all the laughing gets stuck in your throat so suddenly that you feel shocked and guilty that you have laughed at all. Withnail's pathetically sad attempts to get Marwood to have one last drink are shockingly tragic. 'There's always time for a drink.' If that is not Shakespearian, I don't know what is. But it gets better (or worse depending on how you look at it) with Withnail's final solioquy, delivered in the pouring rain to a pack of miserable wolves...it is his final great act and the tragedy is no-one is there to see it except the wolves. When he walks off into the distance, you are left stunned (well I am) just like when you see Othello unexpectedly stick the dagger in his own heart.

Withnail and I is described and reviewed as a comedy, but I see it as a tragi-comedy. If Withnail and I was just a comedy, we would have long forgotten it.
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