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Wish You Were Here

4.5 out of 5 stars 137 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Actors: Emily Lloyd, Tom Bell, Geoffrey Hutchings, Jesse Birdsall, Clare Clifford
  • Directors: David Leland
  • Producers: Wish You Were Here
  • Format: Import, PAL
  • Region: Region 2 (This DVD may not be viewable outside Europe. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Classification: 15
  • Run Time: 91.00 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (137 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B001L1VWWM
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 337,117 in DVD & Blu-ray (See Top 100 in DVD & Blu-ray)

Product Description

Australia released, PAL/Region 0 DVD: LANGUAGES: English ( Dolby Digital 2.0 ), SYNOPSIS: The British Wish You Were Here served as the auspicious film debut for 16-year-old Emily Lloyd. The scene is a British seaside community of the 1950s, where the local adults are shocked and embarrassed by the libertine Lynda (Lloyd), who dresses provocatively, behaves outrageously, and swears like a sailor (her favorite epithet is "Up your bum"). Lynda's mother is dead, and her father has given up trying to do anything with her. She attempts to hold down several jobs, but messes them all up through insolence and carelessness. Excessively promiscuous, Lynda has an affair with a middle-aged friend of her father's. She becomes pregnant, only to use her "fallen" state to gleefully shock and annoy her elders even more. Despite her bravado, there's an underlying sadness about Lynda: the title Wish You Were Here refers to her feelings concerning her late mother. SCREENED/AWARDED AT: BAFTA Awards, Cannes Film Festival, ...Wish You Were Here

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By FAMOUS NAME VINE VOICE on 21 Nov. 2007
Format: DVD
This was one of the few good movies to come out of the 80s. Although I am not keen on films with this sort of theme, I found this an absolute tonic! Hilariously funny in places, which will have you in tears with laughter - before it gets a bit more 'serious' that is.

Emily Lloyd is superb as Linda - the girl with 'attitude', and is most entertaining as we follow her story from the little girl who says 'bum' during a prim family gathering, to a young woman who ends up pregnant after 'bonking' an older man (Tom Bell) in her father's garden shed!

Mixed in with the silliness, we do have some rather moving scenes about a girl who is looking for affection and attention from anywhere she can get it, but doesn't have in inkling on how to go about it... Instead, she sells herself short, and soon discovers that the easiest way to obtain it is to 'flaunt' her sexuality at anything in trousers. Ironically though, this often results into tremendously comic scenes rather than sympathetic ones, and these, however prim the viewer, will simply have to be amused by. Just try and be offended when you see Emily Lloyd's character run around the garden skipping late at night singing and shouting 'up your bum'! I guarantee this will have you in stitches!

Buy this now - it's been unavailable for too long!

Enjoy!
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Format: DVD
The latter of two British films scripted by David Leland and based upon the life of Cynthia Payne, a former madam and prostitute (the other, released just five months earlier, being "Personal Services", featuring Julie Walters), this film looks at her early life and sexual experiences. It does so in the style of a 1960s "kitchen sink" drama, focusing on the everyday aspects of sex and sexuality, such as condoms and nosy uncles. But this film is made absolutely unforgettable by the performance of Emily Lloyd, playing "Linda" (the Cynthia Payne character), in which she displays remarkable fire, vigour, over-brimming life and downright bare-faced cheek (in more ways than one!).

In fact Lloyd's performance is so dazzling that it makes you feel that it is being contrasted against the grim grey boring 1950s the characters inhabit. It's a setting where decorum is more important than feelings which are to be repressed, and sex is often a matter of ignorance or salacious advantage-taking. In this setting Linda explodes, a dervish who kicks against all repression and breaks every rule simply because she wants to. Maybe her behaviour is childish and attention-seeking, but then so were the 1960s in many ways.

And this is just about my only criticism of the film - the 1950s are presented as a monochrome, uniform, dull and repressive era, when in fact they had jazz and early rock and roll and Abstract Expressionism in art, all of which were as exciting as British Invasion and Mary Quant and the Mini. Never mind, each generation paints an unflattering picture of that preceding it, and this repressive atmosphere of course heightens the constrast between the seemingly irrepresible Linda and the dull times she lived in.
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Format: DVD Verified Purchase
I didn't really know what to make of this: perhaps it went way way over my head. However,
a young adolescent girl likes to show off her assets, especially her legs, occasionally her bare bottom: her favourite saying is 'Up Yer Bum'. She likes to ride her bike, and when it comes to the opposite sex, she is a bit of a tease. She loses her maidenhood, always argues with her father. The local cinema projectionist (probably in his late thirties) puts her in the family way........is there going to be an abortion or not?
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To do justice to this film would require words that the Amazon auto-censor would reject outright. Therein lies the essence of the film which cocks a snook at our conventions and hypocrisies at many levels.

The central character is Lynda a precocious child well out of puberty and in her mid-teens. She lost her mother when she was eleven years (there are a few flashbacks) and has recently re-established contact with her father who served in the Royal Navy during WW2. She has a younger sister who by comparison is prim and proper (member of the Girl Guides). The two sisters live with their father where Lynda's behaviour causes stress to the small family circle and beyond. Later, when she discovers she is pregnant, she removes herself (temporarily?) from the family home.

Lynda had developed the habit of using obscene words from an early age and now that she has become fully sexually aware her frequent use of these words throws her into conflict with the conventions of society. There is a deep emotional hiatus at work that stems from the loss of a mother at a critical stage in child's life. Her many adventures are by turn both amusing and pathetic.

The film is full of nuance and deserves to be seen a number of times. The episode with the psychiatrist, for example, has as much to say about psychiatry (the "doctor" chain smokes during his interview with Lynda) as about the patient.

Her exhibitionist behaviour may be understood as a protective shell that is seen to crack at times revealing a sensitive, vulnerable nature (as in the cinema where she breaks down in tears when watching a harrowing scene from "Love Story" with Stewart Granger et al).
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