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The Wise Men: Six Friends and the World They Made by [Isaacson, Walter, Thomas, Evan]
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The Wise Men: Six Friends and the World They Made Kindle Edition

4.8 out of 5 stars 4 customer reviews

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Length: 873 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
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Review

"The Boston Globe" A wealth of new information and insights on the people and events that shaped the first four decades of the Cold War.

Robert A. Caro author of "Master of the Senate: The Years of Lyndon Johnson" Journalism at the heights! Scintillating....Must be read if we are to understand the postwar world.

"San Francisco Chronicle" Entertaining and lively....Isaacson and Thomas have fashioned a Cold War Plutarch.

"The New York Times Book Review" A richly textured account of a class and of a historical period.

"Must be read if we are to understand the postwar world."--Robert A. Caro, author of Master of the Senate: The Years of Lyndon Johnson

Must be read if we are to understand the postwar world. --Robert A. Caro, author of Master of the Senate: The Years of Lyndon Johnson"

Review

Robert A. Caro author of "Master of the Senate: The Years of Lyndon Johnson" Journalism at the heights! Scintillating....Must be read if we are to understand the postwar world.

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 9665 KB
  • Print Length: 873 pages
  • Publisher: Simon & Schuster; Reprint edition (28 Feb. 2012)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B007CBCZKS
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
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  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars 4 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #235,716 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
This book is fantastically interesting. The detail and the descriptions of personalities involved make the subject matter more than palatable, even to the less scholarly among us. The book is, however, very, very long and would have perhaps been better broken up into several volumes. I would characterize it as very well written, exhaustively researched, slightly fawning and uncritical at times, and, in general, well worth lugging around.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This is a very enjoyable history of the origins of the cold war and national security policy making into the 70s. It's much better at covering the period between 1944 to the mid 50s than it is for the later stuff, partly because the protagonists had a more central role earlier and then found themselves on the periphery. Discussing Vietnam policy making through the experiences of the six leaves a lot undiscussed, but it isn't bad.
The early chapters are not particularly interesting, except from the fact that they provide a vivid and surprising insight into the world of the east-coast aristocracy (1st half 20C), which is probably necessary for a full appreciation of what follows.

Apart from the less informative later chapters, the only other grievance that I can cite is the fact one does get the impression that the authors have been a little less critical of their subjects (and JFK) than is reasonable. It is also perhaps too harsh on LBJ.
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Everyone should read this book - how America & Israel shaped and own the financial markets
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Eye opening read
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 4.5 out of 5 stars 105 reviews
100 of 107 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Wisdom Then 17 Jan. 2007
By Mark S. Kucinic - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
In a 1996 interview with David Gergen on NPR, one of this book's central characters makes a case for, what I will hazard to suggest, is one of the authors' central views;

DAVID GERGEN: Let me ask you this in terms of thinking back over then of that period of American foreign policy in the last forty or fifty years, one of the ironies here is that in an age of information you suggest we have too little wisdom.
GEORGE KENNAN: Yes, I do, and one of the things that bothers me about the computer culture of the present age is that one of the things of which it seems to me we have the least need is further information. What we really need is intelligent guidance in what to do with the information we've got.

Thus The Wise Men becomes a paean to, as the authors' admit at the outset, "the twentieth-century tradition of an informal brain trust of internationalists who first served Woodrow Wilson at Versailles and returned home to found the Council on Foreign Relations, " establishing along the way, "a distinguished network connecting Wall Street, Washington, worthy foundations, and proper clubs." The polemics about where one finds wisdom aside, The Wise Men provides a fascinating and uncompromising study of the evolution of U.S. foreign policy vis-à-vis the Soviet Union from the establishment of formal relations during the Roosevelt administration to Vietnam from the perspective of six of it's most significant players; Dean Acheson, Charles "Chip" Bohlen, Averell Harriman, George Kennan, Robert Lovett and John McCloy with side trips into electoral politics and the Middle East. Although I found the authors' fascination with many of these individuals' membership in Harvard's elite Porcellian and Yale's Skull and Bones clubs a bit off-putting (to say nothing of the not-so-veiled apologia for a certain social elitism . . . call me a populist), it would be difficult to find six more pivotal characters. The arguably lesser stars make significant appearances, most notably the Alsop and Bundy brothers, Clark Clifford, James Forrestal and Paul Nitze. I will even forgive the authors' treatment of one of my heroes', George Kennan's, emotional shortcomings. For those of a certain ideological bent, John Foster Dulles and Dean Rusk are not treated sympathetically. It all rings true notwithstanding and The Wise Men makes an excellent post-war study of U.S. foreign policy particularly as a counterpoint to David Halberstam's "Best and the Brightest" for those too busy or cheap to subscribe to Foreign Affairs.
62 of 71 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Reminder... 10 July 2008
By Gio - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
... of a ten-year-old book that shouldn't be forgotten, the "biography" of American foreign policy from the Truman years to the apotheosis of Reagan. Like most biographies, this one concentrates on the childhood of the Cold War containment/exhaustion strategy, the DNA so to speak of neo-conservatism, born of a Democratic mother and a Republican father. Any reader of my other reviews, who doubts my assertion that Ronald Reagan and George Herbert Bush were mere inheritors of a foreign policy as rigidly sustained as if by primogeniture, should take on this book as ferociously as you dare.

The six Wise Men -- McCloy, Bohlen, Acheson, Lovett, Harriman, and Kennan -- would be the last to blush at being identified as "The Greatest Generation" or "The Best and the Brightest." Their egos and their sense of elite entitlement to lead are central to their story. This is a deeper portrait of their intellectual mode than either of those two just-mentioned best-sellers. Authors Isaacson and Thomas are clearly of the same "old school" as their subjects. Their admiration is in a sense self-adulation; even when the Wise Men acknowledged errors, the very nature of their errors turned out to reflect wisdom. My own admiration for the six is considerably more limited, but it's hard to deny the authors' thesis that these Yale and Harvard whiz-kids and their colleagues were the movers-and-shakers of administration after administration. Even as some of them lost a portion of their self-assurance in light of the massive failure in Vietnam, they continued to limn the hegemonist, exceptionalist conception of America which has continued to fail up to the current massive failure in Iraq. Given that all six were perceived as "liberals" aligned with Democratic administrations, some partisans of the other party may come to this book with an established antipathy toward its subjects. All I can say to that is "read it and learn!"
67 of 82 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Exhaustive (exhausting), and fascinating 30 July 1999
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
This book is fantastically interesting. The detail and the descriptions of personalities involved make the subject matter more than palatable, even to the less scholarly among us. The book is, however, very, very long and would have perhaps been better broken up into several volumes. I would characterize it as very well written, exhaustively researched, slightly fawning and uncritical at times, and, in general, well worth lugging around.
73 of 90 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars another reader 17 Mar. 2006
By R. Hallberg - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
A very interesting book, but you have to be able to read between

the lines. Isaacson paints a picture of six powerful men who did

everything they could for US and mankind in general.

Another reviewer used the words fawning and uncritical to

describe the book. Well, there is a good reason for that.

Walter Isaacson, head of Aspen Institute, is himself a member

of the same "Insider Establishment" as the six men in

the book.

For kissing up, he has also been made a member of the

powerful Council on Foreign Relations.

This book should be combined with other more critical or

even negative writings on the subject to help build a more

realistic view.

For example I recommend books by the late Anthony Sutton.

Averell Harriman was a particularly unsavoury character, a

notorious Bilderberger, whose nefarious machinations are

becoming more and more known to the public, even

though still much is suppressed by the media.

Some people I have talked to think that the book should be called "the Wise Guys" instead of "the Wise Men" , but personally I wouldn't go that far.

The world isn't just black and white after all. These guys

looked after their own like everybody else on the planet and maybe, just maybe, in the meantime something good came out of it.
7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A fine survey of American policy makers post WWII 12 Feb. 2010
By Digital Rights - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
The Wise Men by Walter Issacson and Evan Thomas is part homage to six men they see as the founders of "Pax Americana" the post WWII US Foreign Policy and part historical survey of the world through an American, and largely Democratic lens from 1940 to the early 1980's.

Acheson, McCloy, Lovett, Harriman, Kennan and Bohlen are Issacson and Thomas's type of guys. Like the writers they are all Harvard or Yale men who joined the right clubs, followed the right career paths to law, Wall Street and national government "service". The book is split into three sections; the early years of each of the men through to 1940, then through from WWII to the end of the Truman Administration and finally the years largely out of political office during the Eisenhower 1950's and back into the fold during the 1960's with Kennedy and Johnson dealing with the Vietnam War.

The Wise Men flows smoothly is straightforward in it's presentation of the main areas where these men were most active. Dean Acheson at the State Department, Bob Lovett at Defense, John McCloy at Defense and the World Bank, Averell Harriman as a Special Envoy, Roving Ambassador and Advisor to Truman, Kennedy and Johnson, Chip Bohlen and George Kennan as early Ambassadors to the Soviet Union and leading strategists on containment and response to communism. All were critical towards designing reconstruction loans for Europe and support and implementation of the Marshall Plan.

The book covers major events of the time; the Berlin airlift, the retrenchment of the British Empire, particularly in regards to the creation of Isreal, McCarthyism, the Korean War, Eisenhower's election, Kennedy's dealings with Kruschev and the final chapters deal with the Vietnam War. With so many events there is a need for a bit more depth and context for example the arguments for how the Soviet Union viewed Poland could have been better discussed. In each key event the book could have used a paragraph to a page more to better set events in perspective.

This is an entertaining and informative read. The first half is a bit over the top in it's "we're the elite but we're just like you" tone but as each man ages and the times change the book rewards by showing more of the ups and downs in their careers and in US policy. Written in 1986 with a brief 2012 intro the book exposes just how much we have learned since the fall of the Wall and the opening of Soviet Archives. This isn't a limitation in the book but a lesson that history's great stories need regular reinterpretation.
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