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Wings Wild Life

3.7 out of 5 stars 22 customer reviews

Price: £43.95
Only 1 left in stock.
Dispatched from and sold by EliteDigital UK.
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Product details

  • Audio CD (11 Aug. 1995)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: Toshiba
  • ASIN: B00005GKJ2
  • Other Editions: Audio CD
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (22 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,580,309 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Audio CD
This album came out recorded in somewhat of a rush just 7 months after the magical 'Ram' album and less than three months after Lennon's monumental'Imagine' album, and so suffered in comparison. It is a strangely low key debut for Paul's band Wings which would later become one of the '70s best selling and most acclaimed bands. Here, expectations were still so high that people were still either expecting 'Abbey Road Revisited' or else had given up on Paul altogether.
And so it attracted another viscious Rolling Stone put down line: 'the nadir of 60s rock decomposition thus far'.
Again, highly amusing stuff. But taken on its own own merits, it can be seen in a different light. Hindsight shows us the qualities of this album, not apparent to all at the time. It is probably the loosest, and yes coolest collection of songs McCartney has ever produced. Totally without pretension, totally natural and totally free, important qualities which would be missing from many of McCartney's later more studied and commercially successful albums. I am not trying to play down the qualities of 'Band On The Run' (1973), 'Venus And Mars' (1975) or 'Speed Of Sound' (1976) which represented Wings at the height of their powers. In fact this albums has more in common with the marvellous 'London Town' album (1978) in its loose laid back melodic feel.
OK so it is a bit uneven. The opener 'Mumbo Jumbo' is raucous high spirited, well nonsense! 'Bip Bop' is pleasant acoustic rambling, 'Love Is Strange' is a cover...although ahead of its time in its reggae tinges....and the band really gel here, the only complaint being Linda's backing vocals being slightly too high in the mix.
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Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
'Wild Life' (1971) very much finds McCartney at a crossroads in his life. The Beatles had ceased to exist some eighteen months previously and with the group's break-up had come the demise of McCartney's pivotal and long-standing friendship and creative partnership with John Lennon.

Ahead lay new challenges... Having already released two solo albums, 'McCartney' (1970) and 'Ram' (1971) to mixed reviews, McCartney wasted no further time in establishing his new band, Wings, in the Autumn of 1971, consisting of himself and wife Linda, ex Moody Blues guitarist Denny Laine and what became an ever-changing line up of disgruntled session musicians.

'Wild life' was the band's first album. In truth, however, it represented an inauspicious start, bearing all the hallmarks of having been thrown together with too little care (it was recorded in three days flat) and too much faith in spontaneous, haphazard working methods.

In this respect it is an extremely a-typical McCartney album, lacking his usual attention to detail and production polish. In many ways, it stands alone in McCartney's post-Beatles output, both in terms of its slight, lyrically nondescript compositions and the amateurishness of its recording. Indeed, he has never revisited many of the songs on this album in years of subsequent touring.

Needless to say, the album was slaughtered by the critics and divides even the most loyal McCartney fans to this day.

Having said all that, in many ways, 'Wild life' does have its redeeming features and, in a way, hindsight has revealed many of its charms. It has an endearing, quirky, off-the-wall quality and its unfinished feel and unbalanced collection of songs actually make it quite an honest and intriguing album.
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Format: Audio CD
Ram is Macca's best solo album but this first Wings is my favourite. This is lo-fi, rudimentary music. No time or room for superflous or syrupy strings here - there is some sympathetic orchestration on Dear Friend. Some deplore the lack of lyrics on Mumbo. I love it. I call it raw rock'n'roll that doesn't need too much fancy-pants analysis. Turn it up very loud and feel the speakers pulsate. Love is Strange is too short at six minutes. Wildlife the song features an astonishing vocal from McCartney. Some People Never Know opens side two of the original album and is one of his best and most affecting acoustic numbers. I Am Your Singer would have graced the McCartney album. McCartney is sometimes inclined to over-produce, or allows his albums to be over-produced. This is not the case here. Wings got bigger, they may have got better: they rocked harder elsewhere. But this is their warmest and most honest record. It probably needs one more hard rock'n'roll number but what the hell. Go spend a month in a shack in the woods and take this with you.
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Format: Audio CD
McCartney and his new band recorded this album in a matter of days, justifying this by pointing at Dylan who often threw his records together quickly, savouring the spontaneity. Macca doesn't quite pull it off, but there is still much of interest.
It is an album which has been critically mauled since it's release and is his only post Beatles studio album not to hit the UK top ten on release. No singles were released (although Love is Strange was allocated a catalogue number) and even McCartney seems somewhat embarrased by it today, failing to include anything from it on his recent 'Wingspan' compilation.
But this misses the point, true there are no singles or potential singles, all the songs are too long and some of them out stay their welcome in seconds, but this is a record where somehow the whole is much greater than the sum of the parts.
Their cover of Love Is Strange has a wonderful groove, the title track is a bluesy rocker where Paul uses his rawer voice(you know the one, as used on Oh Darling! from Abbey Road) to great effect. Some People Never Know is lovely and the closing Dear Friend is a touching love lettter directed at Lennon, following his vicious How Do You Sleep? It is understated, humble and utterly charming like much of this strange but ultimately worthwhile record.
If you like the Grand Macca of Abbey Road, and Band On The Run, but have never warmed to the understated Macca of his first and second solo album, stay away. But if you want to hear a man finding his feet this is an important and interesting album.
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