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Willing to Believe: The Controversy over Free Will by [Sproul, R. C.]
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Willing to Believe: The Controversy over Free Will Kindle Edition

4.1 out of 5 stars 7 customer reviews

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Length: 241 pages Word Wise: Enabled

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Synopsis

What is the role of the will in believing the good news of the gospel? Why is there so much controversy over free will throughout church history? R. C. Sproul finds that Christians have often been influenced by pagan views of the human will that deny the effects of Adam's fall. In "Willing to Believe", Sproul traces the free-will controversy from its formal beginning in the fifth century, with the writings of Augustine and Pelagius, to the present. Readers will gain understanding into the nuances separating the views of Protestants and Catholics, Calvinists and Arminians, and Reformed and Dispensationalists. This book, like "Sproul's Faith Alone", is a major work on an essential evangelical tenet.

From the Back Cover

What is the role of the will in believing the good news of the gospel? Why has there been so much controversy over free will throughout church history?
Willing to Believe is a major work on the Protestant doctrines of man's total depravity and God's effectual grace. R. C. Sproul traces the free-will controversy from its formal beginning in the fifth century, when Augustine took up the pen against Pelagius, to the present.
By the time you finish this historical tour, you will understand the nuances separating the views of Protestants and Catholics, Calvinists and Arminians, the Reformed and Dispensationalists. You will also see how this debate colors our view of our humanity and shapes our understanding of God's character.

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 1441 KB
  • Print Length: 241 pages
  • Publisher: Baker Books (1 April 2002)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B005UFUS9I
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Not Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars 7 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #553,318 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

4.1 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
It is my sincere pleasure to submit my favorable review of Sproul's "Willing to Believe". As with any Sproul text, the author's position is never in doubt; its clear and compelling exposition is introduced in the first few pages, and is sustained throughout its length. Yet, Sproul's summaries of the major personalities and positions that have arisen throughout Church history and given shape to the free-will / sovereignty debate are fair, accurate, and balanced. Despite the author's endorsement of a particular theological agenda, one gains the impression that he has not intended to write as a polemicist, but as one motivated by an irenic concern for all Christians to be captivated by the splendid vision of God's sovereignty. As a basic survey of the free-will controversy, "Willing to Believe" could be quite useful as an instructional tool in the undergraduate setting. Though some of the age-old, nagging questions are left unanswered, anyone who attentively reads this text will at least understand what the questions are, as well as the various answers that have been proposed down through time. Sproul has repeated shown himself to be a master of the art of communicating concepts crucial to historical theology in a clear, concise, and accessible manner; the text under consideration certainly is no exception. In addition, the book is laid out in an attractive, readable format. The abundance of charts, chronologies, and bibliographies heighten this books instructional usefulness and effectiveness. Again, Sproul is to be commended; "Willing to Believe" is to be read.
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By A Customer on 24 Sept. 1998
Format: Hardcover
If you have the question of whether man has free-will or not, you must buy this book. R.C. has a wonderful way of presenting the facts of this controversy in historical theology. He, of course, presents his views on the issue but one cannot help but agree when they are put up against heretical arguments. If you don't read with an open mind, you will get nothing out of it, but if you do read with an open mind, look out, because this book will lead you to the truth of understanding the false doctrine of free-will and open you up to the truth of God's Sovereignty.
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Format: Hardcover
As the pastor of a large church, I was deeply greatful for R.C.'s book "Willing to Believe". Ever since reading Luther's "Bondage of the Will" severeal years ago, I'd felt for some time that a modern equivalent was badly needed. In many ways Sproul's book fits the bill. It offers a great historical and theological overview on the issue of the human will. I used much of it in a recent lecture to a large group and had a good reception. Thanks R.C!
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Format: Hardcover
The historic controversy over man's so-called "free will" is neatly organized in this enlightening book. Sproul takes you on a historical voyage of the controversy, emphasizing the influential persons behind the debate and their relative positions. He points out (as I personally realized during my hard analysis of and subsequent "conversion" to Calvinism) that Calvinism stands or falls on Total Depravity. If Man's will is "free" then he is able to save himself with Christ's _help_ (e.g., Roman Catholicism and Arminianism). But if Man's will is in bondage to sin (i.e., Man can choose to do all he desires, but all his desires are sinful) then it will take the Sovereign act of the Triune God _alone_ to save men: The Father unconditionally elects a people to redeem, the Son dies specifically for them, and the Spirit regenerates them (causes them to be "born again") and gives them faith in Christ (Calvinism). This historical work will ! make you question everything you believe about your so-called "free" will.
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