£3.99
FREE UK Delivery on book orders dispatched by Amazon over £10.
In stock.
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
William Morris - News fro... has been added to your Basket

Dispatch to:
To see addresses, please
Or
Please enter a valid UK postcode.
Or
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

William Morris - News from Nowhere Paperback – 7 Oct 2016

4.3 out of 5 stars 23 customer reviews

See all 10 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Hardcover
"Please retry"
£32.34
Paperback
"Please retry"
£3.99
£2.86 £3.36
Note: This item is eligible for click and collect. Details
Pick up your parcel at a time and place that suits you.
  • Choose from over 13,000 locations across the UK
  • Prime members get unlimited deliveries at no additional cost
How to order to an Amazon Pickup Location?
  1. Find your preferred location and add it to your address book
  2. Dispatch to this address when you check out
Learn more
£3.99 FREE UK Delivery on book orders dispatched by Amazon over £10. In stock. Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
click to open popover

Frequently bought together

  • William Morris - News from Nowhere
  • +
  • Brave New World
Total price: £10.28
Buy the selected items together

Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.



Product details

  • Paperback: 106 pages
  • Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform (7 Oct. 2016)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1539360326
  • ISBN-13: 978-1539360322
  • Product Dimensions: 21.6 x 0.6 x 27.9 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (23 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 114,699 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • If you are a seller for this product, would you like to suggest updates through seller support?

Product description

About the Author

William Morris (1834–1896) was an English textile designer, artist, writer, socialist and Marxist associated with the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood and the English Arts and Crafts Movement. Morris wrote and published poetry, fiction, and translations of ancient and medieval texts throughout his life. His best-known works include The Defence of Guenevere and Other Poems (1858), The Earthly Paradise (1868–1870), A Dream of John Ball and the utopian News from Nowhere. He was an important figure in the emergence of socialism in Britain, founding the Socialist League in 1884, but breaking with the movement over goals and methods by the end of that decade. He devoted much of the rest of his life to the Kelmscott Press, which he founded in 1891. The 1896 Kelmscott edition of the Works of Geoffrey Chaucer is considered a masterpiece of book design. Born in Walthamstow in East London, Morris was educated at Marlborough and Exeter College, Oxford. In 1856, he became an apprentice to Gothic revival architect G. E. Street. That same year he founded the Oxford and Cambridge Magazine, an outlet for his poetry and a forum for development of his theories of hand-craftsmanship in the decorative arts. In 1861, Morris founded a design firm in partnership with the artist Edward Burne-Jones, and the poet and artist Dante Gabriel Rossetti which profoundly influenced the decoration of churches and houses into the early 20th century. His chief contribution to the arts was as a designer of repeating patterns for wallpapers and textiles, many based on a close observation of nature. He was also a major contributor to the resurgence of traditional textile arts and methods of production. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.


Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Nice big book for tired eyes read this at school and needed to remind myself of people who dared to imagine better things for human beings although unsure how to make it happen
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Arrived on time, new and not damaged at all
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Having recently re-read Aldous Huxley's "Brave New World", I was interested to see that the ideas contained in the book had been influenced by the political ideas and philosophy contained in both "News from Nowhere" (William Morris) and "Looking Backward" (Edward Bellamy). I decided to buy both.

Currently (October 2009) I have not read Bellamy - but have read Morris with a dgree of pleasure and satisfaction I rarely gain from political tracts.

The writing and story is straightforward yet contains profound insights into the workings of a brutal capitalist economy and the ways in which a more gentle, human centred economic system could exist.

This new world contains wit, romance and friendship but is not sentimentalised; problems exist and the issues are how to solve them for the benefit of all.

It was a delightful and politically stirring book. Read it and have some faith restored! Overall - as important as Huxley's work
Comment 16 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Early on in Morris's Utopian fantasy he describes a cleansed Thames full of fish. Fifty years ago the Thames was a biologically dead chemical soup - but now it is indeed clean, healthy and teeming with fish. Morris would be pleased, and I agree. But of course in all other respects the contemporary United Kingdom is hardly the socialist paradise of which Morris dreamed. Within the first few pages, I was laughing out loud at the absurdity of his ideas. The only possible way in which his fantasy could work would be if everyone was like William Morris - and even then, I have my doubts. His prescriptions are risibly ignorant of the most basic facts of human nature. To take just one example: in his Utopia, there are no schools and children are not taught to read, but we are expected to believe that they just teach themselves from picking up books which are lying around, and that many of them become expert in "Welsh, Irish, French, German, Latin and Greek" simply by a sort of osmosis. Anyone with half a brain could see instantly that all his ideas are utterly and disastrously impossible. It would be laughable did not one recall the huge amount of human suffering and death caused directly by socialism and communism throughout the twentieth century. I don't let Morris off the hook for all of that. He was a good artist, but a rotten political theorist. He should have stuck to embroidering tapestries and not have embarrassed himself with this absurd (and boring) tract.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
William Morris is best known for his involvement in the Pre-Raphaelite movement and as one of the greatest European pattern-designers since the Middle Ages. He was also a campaigning socialist, a pioneering environmentalist, and a lyric poet, as well as a journalist and a storyteller with a penchant for making his dreams reality. Much of his prose writings focused on the theme of an earthly paradise, which is the subject of "News from Nowhere." First published in serial form in the "Commonweal" in 1890, this novella offers Morris' ideal future for England as a pastoral society born out of revolution. A true utopian vision of the future, it is largely forgotten in comparison to the dramatic dystopian works such as "Brave New World" and "Nineteen Eighty-Four," which have dominated the interest of scholars and students.
"News from Nowhere, or, An Epoch of Rest: being some chapters from a Utopian Romance" tells the story of a young Englishman who goes to bed one night in his London home and wakes up in a strange world where his "neighbors" talk about the year 2001 as thought it had happened in the past. Morris depicts an England where radical changes have altered not only the way things look but the key elements of the society, which is now structured according to the ideals of communism. This means a world without money or private property but with a perfect equality between all citizens who share in the daily labor.
In addition to these common features of a utopian society, Morris argues that labor would be regarded as a pleasure rather than as a chore. This is possible because in the ideal world Morris envisions every citizen does the job that matches their skills and is able to take pride in the fruit of their labors.
Read more ›
1 Comment 9 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
For what is basically a didactic, political novel, this is remarkably moving and intelligent. Give it a read, it's short.
Comment 4 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I really enjoyed this as it offers food for thought in many spheres. His views of society should be enforced reading for our current batch of politicians who are so heavily interested only in economic growth whilst neglecting all other aspects of a community.

I would recommend this book to anyone who considers Morris uniquely as a designer; they should purchase a copy and see what other areas he was interested in.
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
By Peasant TOP 500 REVIEWER on 1 Dec. 2011
Format: Paperback
Left-wing writers sometimes claim Morris as a socialist to sit alongside the likes of Keir Hardie, a pioneer of the British labour movement. Reading this, his personal Utopia, reveals how far his ideas were from those of his working class contemporaries. Morris's ideal world skates over many obvious problems, and assumes much in the way of perfectability in human nature. He isn't a particularly skilled writer of "fiction" (this is in no meaningful sense a novel) and, after starting with an appealling bang, the book gets bogged down and becomes rather heavy going as time passes. It isn't something most people would read for pure enjoyment, but it is important, if you wish to have an insight into Morris's place in late 19th century reform, to have read it.

Morris himself came from a privileged capitalist background - his father had made a fortune by wise (or lucky) investment - and his experience of the evils of industrialisation was that of an observer, not a victim. He had a highly romanticised sensibility and felt that, if his ideas could only be widely put into action, the world would become a paradise of fairness and beauty. His practical attempts, though today we cherish the results in the shape of the beautiful objects and designs created, had little impact on 19th century industrialism. His craftman-made objects were eye-wateringly expensive, accessible only to well-heeled idealists like himself. Meanwhile, the benefits of modern technology became available to ordinary people because of, not despite, the increased efficiency of factory production.

The astute reader will see that the way of doing things described in "News from Nowhere" could not, in practice, bring the benefits of science, research and modern medicine to an egalitarian citizenry in the way he hoped.
Read more ›
Comment 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Look for similar items by category