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I Will Never Not Ever Eat a Tomato Pop-Up (Charlie and Lola) Hardcover – 26 Sep 2007

4.8 out of 5 stars 12 customer reviews

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Hardcover, 26 Sep 2007
£23.31
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Product details

  • Hardcover: 16 pages
  • Publisher: Candlewick Press (MA); Nov Pop edition (26 Sept. 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0763637084
  • ISBN-13: 978-0763637088
  • Product Dimensions: 25.3 x 2.4 x 25.2 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (12 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,779,515 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • If you are a seller for this product, would you like to suggest updates through seller support?

Product description

Amazon Review

Lola will not eat peas. In fact, she won't eat carrots, potatoes, mushrooms, eggs, sausages, cauliflower, cabbage or baked beans. And she will absolutely not eat a tomato.

When Charlie discovers that if peas are green drops from Greenland, and that carrots are orange twigets from Jupiter, even Lola is tempted to clear her plate.

I Will Not Ever Never Eat a Tomato is an hilarious book that picks up a familiar childhood theme and takes it to the extreme. The imaginative presentation of the text, combined with the mish-mash collage of Lauren Child's illustrations brings an everyday dilemma to rip-roaring life and offers an ingenious solution to a problem that can turn into a daily battle between parent and child.

I Will Not Ever Never Eat A Tomato is the best fun a child will ever have at supper time. Age range: 3 to 5--Susan Harrison --This text refers to an alternate Hardcover edition.

Review

Brilliant (Sunday Telegraph)

So good, it's exhilarating (Independent)

A superb book to make you laugh out loud (Bookseller)

A fun look at the problem of fussy eating (motherandbaby.co.uk)

A mischievous wit and cunning simplicity which, although it may have baffled some traditionalists, is still instantly embraced and understood by children (Books For Keeps)

A paean to the early resistance years that are toddlerdom (The Guardian)

One of my favourite books for children...The story is compelling and the pictures enchanting, but the typography is not what you would expect. The letters vary in shape and size, some lines are straight and others meander across the page. Young children love this; those who cannot yet read pick out the letters; those who can, love the variation and delight at being able to cope with it. (Sue Walker Books For Keeps)

Brilliant design and a delight to share (NLA Guide to Literary Resources)

A wonderful corrective for picky eaters (The Sunday Times)

Your offspring will be drawn in by the off-the-wall visuals that mix line drawings and patterns with photographs, creating a world that is absolutely grounded in reality yet also wildly imaginative (The Guardian)

A fresh and very funny picture book (Bookseller)

A brilliantly designed book from cover, typography and illustration to endpapers and will amuse all those fussy eaters out there (Literacy & Learning)

Brilliant design and a delight to share (Guide to Literary Resources)

Teatime will never be the same again after this glorious book by the Smarties Prize-winning author (Daily Mail)

Only Lauren Child could come up with an idea as successfully wacky as this (Nicholas Tucker The Independent)

[Child] brings an eclecticism and freshness to her work that appeals directly to children (Financial Times)

A fun look at fussy eating (Mother and baby.co.uk)

Quirky imagination and wry humour make this a wonderful book (Time Out) --This text refers to an alternate Hardcover edition.

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Customer Reviews

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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
Charlie's sister Lola is a very fussy eater. She will *not* eat peas, carrots, potatoes, mushrooms and most other foods.
In this story, Charlie is left in charge of Lola at dinner time. He tricks her into eating by pretending that carrots are actually 'orange twiglets from Jupiter', etc. In this way, he manages to get Lola to eat all her food, even her moonsquirters (tomatoes).
I really enjoyed this book and think that mums and dads could copy these tricks for their children!
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This story of Charlie's search for a food that his younger sister Lola will eat is absolutely charming, written and illustrated with wit and understanding. Adults and children alike will enjoy seeing real toddler behaviour subtly exaggerated. Young children may be helped to view their own behaviour more objectively, while older children will sympathise with Charlie's sense of responsibility for a difficult (but imaginative and never malicious) younger sibling.
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By Donald Mitchell HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 9 May 2004
Format: Hardcover
Many young children don't like tomatoes. Some retain that distaste into adulthood. This story shows that stated fussiness about food can simply be a way of getting attention. Parents: Pay attention to this story! The colorful collages of photographs and childlike drawings bring excitement and freshness to the story.
Lola is a "small and very fussy" eater. Charlie is assigned by their parents to feed Lola.
Lola begins to expound her theories:
"carrots are for rabbits"
"peas are too small and too green"
Lola goes on to list peas, carrots, potatoes, mushrooms, spaghetti, eggs, sausages, cauliflower, cabbage, baked beans, bananas, and oranges as banned items. She also notes her reservations about apples, rice, cheese, and fish sticks. "And I absolutely will never not ever eat a tomato." Sounds like peanut butter and jelly are coming up to me.
Then Charlie attacks directly by putting out some carrots. Lola looks at them and says, "Then why are those carrots there, Charlie?"
"Those are orange twiglets from Jupiter," says Charlie.
"Mmm, not bad," Lola replied, "and took another bite."
Charlie puts out peas and describes them as "green drops from Greenland" and Lola finds them "quite tasty."
Mashed potatoes become "cloud fluff from the pointiest peak of Mount Fuji," and Lola decides "I love to eat clouds."
Fish sticks become "ocean nibbles from the supermarket under the sea -- mermaids eat them all the time." Lola wants to know if she can have more.
Suddenly Lola turns the tables, "Charlie, will you pass me one of those?" Lola continued, "Yes, of course, moonsquirters are my favorite." "You didn't think they were tomatoes, did you, Charlie?"
Obviously, Lola knows that they are playing a game, and she likes it.
Read more ›
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Format: Paperback
This story depicts a fastidious sister and her witty brother. Lola is Charlie's little sister; she is always fussy about her food. It is hard for Charlie to give Lola her dinner, because she can always find some ludicrous or comical reason to refuse to eat anything she dislikes. One day, Charlie played a trick on Lola. Charlie with his excellent eloquence persuaded Lola to eat some of the food that she would not normally ever taste.
Vivid similes and evidence of a vast imagination is found in this amusing book. This is helpful for young children to cultivate their creative thinking.Generally speaking, the text is delightful. You can try to read aloud slowly the words for things that Lola hates to eat, in order to enhance the fun by the way you read them. Through the conversations between Charlie and Lola, we can see Charlie's trickery is successful.
Vibrant illustrations are a perfect match for this funny story. Different forms of typographical characters and the winding layout of sentences aptly reflect the character of Lola and Charlie. However, when I read this book the first time, I was really surprised at the illustrations, because some of them are drawings and some of them are photographs. Although sometimes the drawings and photographs are a little bit quirky, they are well suited to the text.
This book is suitable both for children and for adults who have to deal with fussy eaters for whom the book gives ideas to imitate, in a way that will make them laugh!
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Format: Hardcover
As many parents know, "green drops from Greenland" can sound ever so much more attractive than plain old green peas. Clever Charlie manages to get her little sister Lola to enthusiastically eat a nutritious meal. Cute collage-type illustrations. My 7 year old son read it, and came to tell me how funny he thought it was. I think so too...
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Format: Board book
This is great book for little ones which helps identify food and colours. My 2 year old insists on it every night. It has good illustration and clear text - I would definately recommend this for a bedtime read.
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