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Wikinomics: How Mass Collaboration Changes Everything Paperback – 1 Jun 2008

3.7 out of 5 stars 42 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Paperback: 368 pages
  • Publisher: Atlantic Books; Main edition (1 Jun. 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 184354637X
  • ISBN-13: 978-1843546375
  • Product Dimensions: 12.9 x 2.7 x 19.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (42 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 156,986 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

"* 'If you want to enlighten yourself about how the internet is revolutionizing the way people and business operate, then this is a dizzyingly fascinating book to help you...' Guardian * 'A must-click for all webheads... Great fun for anyone with an interest in why this online lark is really as important as we evangelists keep saying it is.' Matthew D'Ancona, Spectator"

About the Author

Don Tapscott is Chief Executive and Founder of New Paradigm, a think tank and strategy consulting company. He is the author of ten books. He teaches at the University of Toronto. Anthony D. Williams has been researching and writing books about trends in technology and society for over a decade. His advice has been sought by international institutions including the World Bank. He holds a Masters in Research from the LSE and is Vice President and Executive Editor at New Paradigm. Visit www.wikinomics.com


Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
I'm sorry to disagree with most of the other Amazon reviewers but as someone who reads a lot of business books I was deeply disappointed with this book for the following reasons. First all the author ever sees are the increasing benefits and upsides to mass collaboration online. Arguments to the contrary are swiftly dismissed and the chapter on making money from mass collaboration is more of the investment now and profits will magically follow thinking that characterised the dotcom boom. Secondly the author is obsessed with the "revolution" that mass market collaboration is apparently creating in every aspect of society. While I don't want to underplay the importance of this trend, I find the term "revolution" is too strong (like Web 2.0) and the lack of reference to the precedents of mass collaboration disappointing(e.g. earlier online communities). Finally and frustrating the book is poorly edited and structured. The font size is tiny and the obscure chapter headings seem to overlap with one another. In short it is hard getting to the point with this book. I did, however, find within it some inspiring examples of mass collaboration that I hadn't previously heard of - for example the mining company example at the beginning. But overall I would not recommend this book - for me it simply a reflection of the euphoria that gripped the internet world back in the end of 2006 with the rising popularity of Facebook et al. The world has moved on since then.
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Format: Hardcover
Don Tapscott and Anthony D. Williams have written an intriguing, necessary and, in some ways, groundbreaking book, which we recommend to everyone...with some caveats. The authors examine the possibilities of mass collaboration, open-source software and evolutionary business practices. They integrate examples from the arts ("mashups"), scholarship (Wikipedia) and even heavy industry (gold mining) to argue that new forces are reshaping human societies. Some of their examples will be familiar, but others will surprise and educate you. However, the authors are so deeply part of the world they discuss that they may inflate it at times - for instance, making the actions of a few enthusiasts sound as if they already have transformed the Internet - and they sometimes fail to provide definitions or supporting data. Is the "blogosphere," for example, really making members of the younger generation into more critical thinkers? Tapscott and Williams repeatedly dismiss criticisms of their claims or positions without answering them. The result is that the book reads at times like a guidebook, at times like a manifesto and at times like a cheerleading effort for the world the authors desire. It reads, in short, like the Wikipedia they so admire: a valuable, exciting experiment that still contains a few flaws.
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Format: Paperback
Don Tapscott's Paradigm Shift was required reading when I was in college in the mid-1990s, many of the important concepts such as enterprise collaboration and the co-opting of consumers in the production process are extended and expanded upon in Wikinomics: How Mass Collaboration Changes Everything to include web 2.0 services and the latest iterations of open source software.

Is there anything in Wikinomics that readers of Tapscott's previous books would find surprising or different? No. To be honest I found it most of use for pulling together case studies for internal and external presentations to help clients and peers `get' online/digital/web 2.0.

If you haven't read a Tapscott book before then this one is a well-read and researched book that provides up-to-date examples of offline and and online collaboration and how this is affecting the world of commerce. If you are familiar with his work pick it up secondhand on Amazon Marketplace it's an interesting but by no means essential read.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
An insightful examination of the effect of mass collaboration upon the evolving world of business and information that covers some obvious and well known fields such as Wikipedia, but other less known areas such as Boeing and The Human Genome Project.
Tapscotts message is very clear. The old style world of the hierarchical, executive centric model of corporate governance is dying, and a new more open world of open information, mass participation, and arguably democratic, mode of development is emerging. The implications of this are met with opposition, which Tapscott routinely explores, but argues that opposition is essentially futile. The successful corporations are those that have introduced greater leniency with intellectual property and patent laws, and even when those reluctant companies have had their intellectual property integrity compromised, they have nonetheless benefited from the innovation that mass collaboration brings.
The way forward, Tapscott argues, is largely driven by the blogosphere, and ideagoras, similar in the way that Athenians and the inhabitants of Alexandria shared information in ancient times, albeit with the tools of mass communication.
Tapscott differentiates between the Web, and the Web 2.0, in the sense that the former was the earlier version of the net, essentially more closed and generally with a read only format, and the latter being the more open, widely participated internet world of google, youtube, myspace, and the blogosphere.

This has led to a revolution in the workplace wherein managers and executives frequently use the blogosphere for communication and increased participation with employees, wherein the employee/employer demarcation is increasingly been flattened.
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