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Wikinomics: How Mass Collaboration Changes Everything Hardcover – 12 Jul 2007

3.7 out of 5 stars 42 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Hardcover: 408 pages
  • Publisher: Atlantic Books (12 July 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1843546361
  • ISBN-13: 978-1843546368
  • Product Dimensions: 14.9 x 3.2 x 22.3 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (42 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 309,492 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description


An important book.
-- A G Lafley, CEO Proctor & Gamble

One of the best business books I have read in years. If you are running a business, you would be cavalier not to take on board its messages. -- Management Today, August 2007

The best picture so far of the new world of enterprise, collaboration, innovation and value creation. This is a breathtaking piece of work. -- Tom Peters, author of In Search of Excellence

Wikinomics heralds the biggest change in collaboration to date... In order to understand the opportunities this presents for companies, read this book. -- Eric Schmidt, CEO Google

About the Author

Don Tapscott is chief executive of New Paradigm, a think tank. He is the author of ten books. He teaches at the University of Toronto. Anthony D. Williams is a research director at New Paradigm. He teaches at the London School of Economics.

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
I'm sorry to disagree with most of the other Amazon reviewers but as someone who reads a lot of business books I was deeply disappointed with this book for the following reasons. First all the author ever sees are the increasing benefits and upsides to mass collaboration online. Arguments to the contrary are swiftly dismissed and the chapter on making money from mass collaboration is more of the investment now and profits will magically follow thinking that characterised the dotcom boom. Secondly the author is obsessed with the "revolution" that mass market collaboration is apparently creating in every aspect of society. While I don't want to underplay the importance of this trend, I find the term "revolution" is too strong (like Web 2.0) and the lack of reference to the precedents of mass collaboration disappointing(e.g. earlier online communities). Finally and frustrating the book is poorly edited and structured. The font size is tiny and the obscure chapter headings seem to overlap with one another. In short it is hard getting to the point with this book. I did, however, find within it some inspiring examples of mass collaboration that I hadn't previously heard of - for example the mining company example at the beginning. But overall I would not recommend this book - for me it simply a reflection of the euphoria that gripped the internet world back in the end of 2006 with the rising popularity of Facebook et al. The world has moved on since then.
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Format: Hardcover
Don Tapscott and Anthony D. Williams have written an intriguing, necessary and, in some ways, groundbreaking book, which we recommend to everyone...with some caveats. The authors examine the possibilities of mass collaboration, open-source software and evolutionary business practices. They integrate examples from the arts ("mashups"), scholarship (Wikipedia) and even heavy industry (gold mining) to argue that new forces are reshaping human societies. Some of their examples will be familiar, but others will surprise and educate you. However, the authors are so deeply part of the world they discuss that they may inflate it at times - for instance, making the actions of a few enthusiasts sound as if they already have transformed the Internet - and they sometimes fail to provide definitions or supporting data. Is the "blogosphere," for example, really making members of the younger generation into more critical thinkers? Tapscott and Williams repeatedly dismiss criticisms of their claims or positions without answering them. The result is that the book reads at times like a guidebook, at times like a manifesto and at times like a cheerleading effort for the world the authors desire. It reads, in short, like the Wikipedia they so admire: a valuable, exciting experiment that still contains a few flaws.
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Format: Paperback
Don Tapscott's Paradigm Shift was required reading when I was in college in the mid-1990s, many of the important concepts such as enterprise collaboration and the co-opting of consumers in the production process are extended and expanded upon in Wikinomics: How Mass Collaboration Changes Everything to include web 2.0 services and the latest iterations of open source software.

Is there anything in Wikinomics that readers of Tapscott's previous books would find surprising or different? No. To be honest I found it most of use for pulling together case studies for internal and external presentations to help clients and peers `get' online/digital/web 2.0.

If you haven't read a Tapscott book before then this one is a well-read and researched book that provides up-to-date examples of offline and and online collaboration and how this is affecting the world of commerce. If you are familiar with his work pick it up secondhand on Amazon Marketplace it's an interesting but by no means essential read.
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Format: Hardcover
This book has plenty of flaws, many pointed out by other reviewers here, but it's central problem is it fails to explain how mass collaboration changes EVERYTHING. Sure it comes up with some compelling evidence that certain sorts of activity and business involving information have changed and will change more.

But when it alleges that this will extend into the physical world, of car design for instance, its examples are woefully thin. Furthermore the authors simply don't acknowledge that design is only one part of the production of cars and that other physical processes are likely to remain unchanged.

I'm sure if you are a magazine editor and your friends all work in publishing or software everything is changing, but where is the evidence that nursing, bus driving, window cleaning or garden design to pluck a few random examples ever will be revolutionised by mass collaboration?

The authors simply make an extravagant claim they cannot back up.

Furthermore as a web editor looking for practical pointers, the news that the staff at Geek Squad are encouraged to spend all day on online games simply isn't helpful to me. They live in a specialised world and nothing the authors write has convinced me that my own workplace would benefit from me and my colleagues playing online games. Again, the authors' examples don't represent EVERYTHING, they represent life in parts of California, London, Bangalore and a handful of other places.
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