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Why Call Me God?: The Gospel Seen with a Single Eye Paperback – 1 Sep 2009

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Product details

  • Paperback: 460 pages
  • Publisher: Capabel Press Ltd (1 Sept. 2009)
  • ISBN-10: 0956205704
  • ISBN-13: 978-0956205704
  • Product Dimensions: 15.6 x 2.5 x 23.4 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars 1 customer review
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,944,080 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
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Review

.. over the weekend he gave me your book and I have spent the last 5 days reading it (could not put it down). I find the central idea very convincing and am most impressed by the consistency and logic of the argument and the great amount of detail having to do with the texts. I studied Greek also, so am familiar with the alphabet and some of the words but can't pretend to follow all the detail (I take your word for it). I was also raised Catholic and really your book explains a whole lot that to my ears often seemed difficult to understand or downright illogical. If I go to Mass now I will be listening with 'new' ears, for example last Sunday had to do with the Pentacost about which you had interesting things to say. Your central thesis is in a sense quite 'shocking', yet it is hard to argue with. --PG, Los Angeles, USA

Let me say what a terrific book is Why Call Me God. It is an excellent contribution to a true understanding of the Jesus myth, revealing numerous subtleties and nuances lost in translation. --KH, Sussex, UK

In the wake of several recent books emanating from the Nag Hammadi trove, Hatfield, in his ground-breaking book Why Call Me God?, takes us into the unknown through his unravelling of riddles and mysteries encased in the ancient scriptures that have come down to us as the modern Bible. His retranslation of the ancient Greek source provides clues that he astutely and logically interprets. The conclusions are indeed thought-provoking and the reader becomes Gnostic in the true sense of the term, that is knowledgeable about the true messages of these scriptures. Able to decipher the ancient Greek, this reader came to a few insights on her own. For one, the writers of these ancient scriptures, in putting forth the notion that woman [is] made by the lesser god, were likely of a patriarchal mindset. Their words insinuated that a woman is of lower status than man and is thus obliged to obey her man. Also, these writers, being Gnostic, found a way to understand, be knowledgeable about the origins of the world's evil ways through their dualistic approach to religion and the mysteries of the unknown. On the other hand, could it be that these scriptures were actually an ancient manifest for the simpler lifestyle, e.g. a herder's life which was perceived as good, as opposed to the farmer's lifestyle, perceived as evil, the latter then giving rise to towns and cities (and modern life as we know it)? In any event, they are writings left by an ancient group trying to understand the mysteries of life. So, now that we have become knowledgeable, what should we believe in? The answer provided by these ancient writers as perceived by this reader was listen to one's heart, see with one's heart and all becomes clear! A must read for the curious woman or man, especially anyone interested in ancient history, philosophy, religion, comparative religion and/or the great mythologies of this world, even if one does not fully agree with the findings. --BF, Geneva, Switzerland

The UK publisher of this outstanding and historically important book wishes to advise prospective readers that reader reviews received to date - several too long to cite here in full - may all be found at: http://www.whycallmegod.com/reader-reviews.html --Capabel Press Ltd

In the wake of several recent books emanating from the Nag Hammadi trove, Hatfield, in his ground-breaking book Why Call Me God?, takes us into the unknown through his unravelling of riddles and mysteries encased in the ancient scriptures that have come down to us as the modern Bible. His retranslation of the ancient Greek source provides clues that he astutely and logically interprets. The conclusions are indeed thought-provoking and the reader becomes Gnostic in the true sense of the term, that is knowledgeable about the true messages of these scriptures. Able to decipher the ancient Greek, this reader came to a few insights on her own. For one, the writers of these ancient scriptures, in putting forth the notion that woman [is] made by the lesser god, were likely of a patriarchal mindset. Their words insinuated that a woman is of lower status than man and is thus obliged to obey her man. Also, these writers, being Gnostic, found a way to understand, be knowledgeable about the origins of the world's evil ways through their dualistic approach to religion and the mysteries of the unknown. On the other hand, could it be that these scriptures were actually an ancient manifest for the simpler lifestyle, e.g. a herder's life which was perceived as good, as opposed to the farmer's lifestyle, perceived as evil, the latter then giving rise to towns and cities (and modern life as we know it)? In any event, they are writings left by an ancient group trying to understand the mysteries of life. So, now that we have become knowledgeable, what should we believe in? The answer provided by these ancient writers as perceived by this reader was listen to one's heart, see with one's heart and all becomes clear! A must read for the curious woman or man, especially anyone interested in ancient history, philosophy, religion, comparative religion and/or the great mythologies of this world, even if one does not fully agree with the findings. --BF, Geneva, Switzerland

From the Publisher

In his controversial new book Why Call Me God?, Hatfield explains the Gnostic methodology adopted by those who wrote the scriptures at a time when the Christian church did not yet exist. Working direct from the primary texts in Greek, he shows that there are two gods in the narrative of scripture, not one. The first god is considered to be good; but a serious calamity arises in the narrative when a second god, a deceitful look-alike and impostor, is placed in charge of the created world.
Hatfield shows how the first impression formed by many readers is promptly inverted once the numerous riddles are solved and the two 'gods' clearly distinguished.
He goes on to demonstrate how the gospel authors consistently portray Jesus to be evil Cain, a fictional figure first arising in the Old Testament book of Genesis and styled as "firstborn of all creation".
Next he shows how the figure of the 'Father', the one to whom Jesus prays, is disclosed (to those readers in Greek who can solve the riddles) to be none other than the ancient serpent from the book of Genesis, alias the Devil or Satan.
As Hatfield points out, these conclusions are entirely consistent with Jewish tradition which identifies the ancient serpent as father to Cain.
Hatfield's impressive and carefully argued book develops a coherent set of explanations for so many features of scripture which on any other basis are seen to be utterly puzzling. But how curious it is that so much of what he explains should be wholly unknown to the Christian tradition.
It appears that the Christian churches have been badly caught out, failing even to recognise the deeper theme of scripture.
There are many indications too that Constantine's so-called 'Catholic' church was locked from the start in the deceitful embrace of the 'wrong' god. For as Hatfield points out, the central claim of Christian doctrine, that man is made in the image of God and will live for ever, is a repetition of the attractive suggestion made in the narrative ofGenesis by the serpent to the woman, Eve.
Yet it is by embracing this very suggestion that Eve finds herself deceived.
A definitive book. Read it for yourself - and cross check with your own Bible what it says.

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