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White Noise (Picador 40th Anniversary Edition) (Picador 40th Anniversary Editn) by [DeLillo, Don]
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White Noise (Picador 40th Anniversary Edition) (Picador 40th Anniversary Editn) Kindle Edition

3.5 out of 5 stars 59 customer reviews

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Length: 340 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
Page Flip: Enabled
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Product Description

Review

America's greatest living writer. (Observer)

An extraordinarily funny book on a serious subject, effortlessly combining social comedy, disaster, fiction and philosophy . . . hilariously, and grimly, successful. (Daily Telegraph)

An astonishing novel . . . unforgettable . . . nearly every page crackles with memorable moments and perfectly turned phrases . . . dizzying, darkly beautiful fiction. (Sunday Times)

Book Description

A brilliantly black and funny novel about humanity’s greatest fear – death.

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 1064 KB
  • Print Length: 340 pages
  • Publisher: Picador (2 Feb. 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B0073HNM1M
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars 59 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #173,636 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
Reading this book staggered me: the phrasing is so spot on, the themes so unusual yet compelling, the dialogue so full of witty, off-the-wall observation that I was left marvelling at the author's magical ability to put words together in unusual yet telling combinations and searching bookshops for more of his books. But having read three others from different periods of his career (the vastly overrated 'Underworld', the execrable 'Ratner's Star' and the mixed 'Great Jones Street') I am left in little doubt that this is his chef d'oeuvre. By some fortunate inspiration, DeLillo discovered his perfect theme for this book: fear of death. He takes this theme and looks at it from all possible angles; yet this is not at all a morbid book. It is instead the funniest black comedy around: the exchange between Jack and his wife when preparing to have sex made me explode with laughter. I found the latter so hilarious that I even shared it with one of my advanced English as a foreign language classes, whose eyes were standing on stalks by the end! Last but certainly not least, DeLillo's understanding of the impact of popular culture on our minds and lives is remarkable: he forced me to make connections about the insidious influence of technology and the media that I would certainly never otherwise have made, and continue to bear in mind every time I read a newspaper or switch on my computer. If you only ever read one contemporary novel, read this one: this is the book that encapsulates our time, not 'Underworld'.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
We drove 22 miles into the country around Farmington. There were meadows and apple orchards. White fences trailed through the rolling fields. Soon the sign started appearing. THE MOST PHOTOGRAPHED BARN IN AMERICA. We counted five signs before we reached the site. There were 40 cars and a tour bus in the makeshift lot. We walked along a cowpath to the slightly elevated spot set aside for viewing and photographing. All the people had cameras; some had tripods, telephoto lenses, filter kits. A man in a booth sold postcards and slides -- pictures of the barn taken from the elevated spot. We stood near a grove of trees and watched the photographers. Murray maintained a prolonged silence, occasionally scrawling some notes in a little book.

"No one sees the barn," he said finally.

A long silence followed.

"Once you've seen the signs about the barn, it becomes impossible to see the barn."

He fell silent once more. People with cameras left the elevated site, replaced by others.

We're not here to capture an image, we're here to maintain one. Every photograph reinforces the aura. Can you feel it, Jack? An accumulation of nameless energies."

There was an extended silence. The man in the booth sold postcards and slides.

"Being here is a kind of spiritual surrender. We see only what the others see. The thousands who were here in the past, those who will come in the future. We've agreed to be part of a collective perception. It literally colors our vision. A religious experience in a way, like all tourism."

Another silence ensued.

"They are taking pictures of taking pictures," he said.
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What a strange book, not at all a conventional novel with clear characters and a plot. Much more like ambient music that a song ( notable that the original cover was designed by Brian Eno) , much more impressionistic that realistic, this is a satire of almost everything in modern life. The main theme is fear of death, particularly for those of us without any belief in an after life of any kind, and there are some penetrating and interesting thoughts and phrases around that, usually build into conversations bwetween academics. It is also a satire on consumerism, academic life, marraige, fidelity, sense of identity, and our quest for answers to everything.

It is not an easy read though, and frequently I almost gave up - although that is something i rarely do when reading. There is a strange beauty to the writing which kept me going, despite how disturbing the themes. I didn't find the book funny - dark, sometimes compelling, always strange - but not amusing.

Strange - but somehow worth reading
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Format: Paperback
DDL has written something clever and funny here but it stretches definition to call it a novel, even more so than Finnegans Wake or Beckett's The Unnameable. It sure looks like the real deal - paper covers, pages, and apparently packed with characters in the conventional sense - Jack Gladney, wife Babette, son Heinrich (apt; you'll see why), an assortment of daughters, ex-sports hack Murray Jay Siskind, Dr Chakravarty, various academics at Jack's college, etc. - but in fact the only person here is DDL himself, relentlessly debating the big issues with himself, death the biggest. Does that matter? No, not when the writing is so excellent - "His bright smile hung there like a peach on a tree" - the philosophising so potent, and the jokes so good. Want to meet the disaster simulation team that uses a real emergency as a practice run for their big simulation? Or the college professor who tutors Hitler studies only to be taught German by the Fuhrer himself? It's all here, including a tacked-on bit at the very end which was obviously a leftover from the planning stage and refused to fit anywhere else. Like I said, not a novel, but a splendid, intelligent and hilarious soliloquy on life, matter, energy and death. The whole damned shooting match, as "Jack Gladney" comes to realise. ADDENDUM JANUARY 22 2016 I should have stressed death more in the above review as it's one of the main themes - put simply, how can we as self-aware beings cope with the constant terror of oblivion? Various "characters", inasmuch as we have any here, try various ploys to achieve this state of divine repression, including a community of German nuns who only pretend to believe in the whole Roman Catholic charade of angels and afterlife to encourage the non-believers. The last word in this 40-chapter novel (maybe significant) is "dead", though the writing is alive as it gets.
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