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White Line Fever Hardcover – 4 Nov 2002

4.5 out of 5 stars 154 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Hardcover: 304 pages
  • Publisher: Simon & Schuster Ltd; First Edition, First Impression edition (4 Nov. 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0684858681
  • ISBN-13: 978-0684858685
  • Product Dimensions: 23.4 x 15.7 x 3.3 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (154 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 574,549 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Amazon Review

In White Line Fever, Lemmy, the thinking person's Ozzy Osbourne, provides a completely unreconstructed, warts and all account of his excessive life--well, the bits he can, or cares to, recall of it anyway. "That was a great time, the summer of 71", he wistfully muses at one point, "I can't remember it, but I'll never forget it!" Leader of Motorhead for close to 30 years, Lemmy has had more drugs, drinks and girls than hot dinners. His mechanism really has gone--in 1980 his blood was officially diagnosed as toxic to other human beings.

Lemmy, born in 1945 and christened Ian Fraser Kilmister, was a vicar's son. His dad, however, didn't stay around long and he was raised, predominantly, by his librarian mother in Wales. A teenager at the birth of rock 'n' roll, Lemmy first took an interest in music after discovering, as he forthrightly puts it, "what an incredible pussy magnet guitars were". After spells in local beat combos he headed off to Manchester and then London. Here he became a roadie for Jimi Hendrix, played in Opal Butterfly, before pretty much ambling into space rockers Hawkwind's line-up during 1971. This was, of course, an era when the group "would get high in the park and talk to the trees--sometimes the trees would win the argument". Sometimes it sounded as if the trees wrote the songs, too. Four years later speedfreak Lemmy was sacked for "doing the wrong drugs".

Vowing to form the "dirtiest rock 'n' roll band in the world", he put together Motorhead, arguably the heaviest (and according to the Guinness Book of Records for about five years, the loudest) heavy metal band ever to grace a stage. Thrilling buzzsaw songs such as Ace of Spades, Bomber, Killed by Death and Hellraiser (as deep as their names suggest) gained them a legion of headbanging fans. And while Lemmy may spend a little too long berating his former record label Sony and griping about recent albums being overlooked, this sex, drugs and metal memoir certainly goes all the way up to 11. --Travis Elborough

About the Author

Born Ian Fraser Kilmister in Stoke-on-Trent in 1945, Lemmy formed Motorhead in 1975. Fronting the band through the highs and lows of superstardom, Lemmy has recorded twenty albums with Motorhead who remain at the top of their profession after twenty-seven years.

JANISS GARZA has been writing about very loud rock since 1987. She has written for RIP, The Los Angeles Times, Entertainment Weekly, and The New York Times. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.


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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
Sure, lots of celebs enter extremely late middle age as well preserved national treasures; few do so on their own terms. Ian Kilmister--boomer, Capricorn, sometime loudest man on the planet--has lived his life like that Jimi Hendrix song: 'let me live my life, the way I want to'. Superficially, that might seem to add up to forty years of professional excess and little more, but as this work shows, it is actually a case-study in what it meant to grow up working class in the North of England immediately after the war. Nobody did a damn thing for him; he carved out what he did, despite a business that has ignored him, mispackaged him and exploited him pretty much since day 2.
Superficially, the book is about sex, drugs and the rest of it; in reality, its about the way in which popular culture has provoked profound social change in the UK and what it means to live through that social experiment--to live your life as an individual in an increasingly collective society.
Lemmy is at pains to emphasize that this is a life that has worked for him but would not work for everyone. He's quite happy to acknowledge that his libertarian views can translate into some un-PC attitudes--and mostly he's just *happy*, which is quite an accomplishment. Ever notice how successful people tend to be like elephants, reciting every grievance and every professional slight--despite a career full of them, Mr. Kilmister remains philosophical and phlegmatic about being thrown out of Hawkwind, the debacle of 'Another Perfect Day' and getting tossed aside by more record labels than he's had Malboros.
To repeat, this is neither philosophy nor literature, but if you want to know why folk like Dave Grohl seek out Lemmy to work with, then listen to 'Damage Case', read this book and you shall have insight.
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Format: Hardcover
Lemmy is the kind of rock star that makes you proud to be British. He doesn't take himself too seriously, he just wants to play in a rock and roll band and get laid after the show. In this book (called an autobiography, but it reads like an interview) he recounts his long career in rock, powered by amphetamines and bourbon, and it is a risible ride indeed. Stories of drink-and-drug-induced foolishness abound, along with interesting pen sketches of his fellow band members over the years. I laughed out loud a lot whilst reading this book, you know you're always going to have a good time, all the time, with Motorhead.
It's the life that you're glad somebody led, just to prove that it can be done.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Brilliant. Awesome. Inspiring. A wonderful insight into the life and career of a true rock and roll icon. And that's from someone who has admired this man from a distance over the years, but wouldn't be considered a die hard fan. In my younger days, I was a die hard Gary Numan fan. Still am to some extent, but my musical taste is much more diverse now than it was back then.

When I heard on the radio that Lemmy had died, I was gutted. The world has lost someone very special, and he will be missed very much, but his legacy will live forever in the music he has created for us through his time here.
I bought this ebook on a whim the day I heard of his passing, along with his last album Bad Magic, and am delighted I did. I highly recommend all fans to read it, and even more so those people who don't think of themselves as fans. It's a real insight into a way of life that most of us can only dream about.
I'm off to buy more Motorhead music, and to wish Mr Kilmister all the very best in the next life.
RIP Lemmy, you're a real trooper.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
One of the best autobiographies by a rock icon you will ever read, the influence this man has made in music is beyond repute he is the Elvis of our age he is the last remaining gentleman of rock/heavy metal/thrash call it what you will when he has gone rock will be truly and utterly dead, there are no lies in this book its all on the line the wit and humour in which he recalls his time on this earth to the point in his life so far is just a pure joy, this is Lemmy at his best (if that is possible he is like a fine wine gets better with age). there is no other musician like him.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I've never been a die hard Motorhead fan, but I've been aware of them and heard their albums at friends' houses since the late seventies, and of course I bought the Ace of Spades album in 1980 like we all did. I am a big Hawkwind fan, and I really only bought the book to read Lemmy's side of his stint with Hawkwind. However I did enjoy the whole book, though the anecdotes get less interesting as we get into the last decade of Motorhead's existance.

The book is really just "the world according to Lemmy", and if you don't agree with Lemmy's views on life this is rapidly going to grate. But I think most people who were rock fans before MTV, and are therefore now middle aged rock fans, will find a lot in the book that they agree with, and of course it's a massive nostalgia fest. What the MTV generation will make of it I don't know. I've just finished Duff McKagan's autobiography, and I have to say I enjoyed Lemmy's book a lot more. If you are, like me, a middle aged rock fan wishing he still had the energy to get down the front then I think you'll love the book and it's well worth the £4.99 I paid for the Kindle version.
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