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Where the Dead Men Go (Conway Trilogy 2) Paperback – 2 Oct 2014

4.4 out of 5 stars 7 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Paperback: 352 pages
  • Publisher: Faber & Faber; Main edition (2 Oct. 2014)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0571239862
  • ISBN-13: 978-0571239863
  • Product Dimensions: 12.9 x 2.2 x 19.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 621,572 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

A terrific, ultra-modern crime novel ... delivered in lyrical, emotive and often piercing prose, it's an assured and classy addition to the ranks of Scotland's crime-writing scene. (Doug Johnstone Independent on Sunday)

'This novel reveals a talent that outshines even his famous relatives. The novel's appetite for the life and language of Glasgow is intoxicating. McIlvanney evokes the city's dark underbelly with razor-like accuracy, and the novel roars off the page like a wild beast on the loose ... superb storytelling, a wonderful eye for character, and a passion for dialogue, it announces the arrival of a Scots poet of the thriller. (Geoffrey Wansell Daily Mail)

'Is there no end to the procession of Scottish writers excelling in the crime genre? In his second novel, Where the Dead Men Go, Liam McIlvanney shows himself to be in the same league as his illustrious compatriots ... McIlvanney tells the story with clarity, terrific dialogue and convincing characters. (Marcel Berlins The Times)

WHERE THE DEAD MEN GO is a well written novel, full of believable characters and dialogue. The pace of the book is a slow build up to an exciting conclusion ... Recommended. (eurocrime.co.uk)

Book Description

Where the Dead Men Go by Liam McIlvanney is a hard boiled and topical thriller set in the Glasgow underworld, from the acclaimed writer of All the Colours of the Town.

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By FictionFan TOP 100 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 9 Sept. 2013
Format: Kindle Edition
When top crime reporter Martin Moir of The Tribune turns up dead, his colleague and friend Gerry Conway finds it hard to accept that his death was suicide. Conway had been a mentor to the younger man but Moir's success in getting exclusives about the workings of the underworld had given him top billing on the paper. Now Conway must return to covering crime at a time when two rival gangs are facing off against each other and a street war looks likely. And he must also try to find out the truth of what happened to Moir...

Set in present day Glasgow, this is a well written story with noir-ish tendencies. Glasgow is shown as a city of violence where rival gangs divide up the turf and corruption is rife. Conway's job as a reporter gives McIlvanney the opportunity to look at the changing world and diminishing importance of newspapers in the age of online news. Conway's character is well developed as we see him struggle to juggle the demands of the job and his family (partner, ex-wife and children). As Conway's investigation begins to uncover the depth of the corruption, he and his family become the targets of the gangland bosses. A flawed hero, Conway's integrity is put to the test when danger threatens and, as in all noir, moral certainties become blurred.

Liam McIlvanney is the son of William McIlvanney of Laidlaw fame so it's hard to read this book without drawing comparisons. Like 'Laidlaw' this book concentrates on the seamier side of Glasgow life, the underworld and gangsters for whom violence is a way of life. Both writers are noir-ish in their view of the city and both see justice as something that happens beyond the bounds of courts and law.
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Format: Kindle Edition
I haven't read the first book in this series which might be why I wasn't hooked straight away but I've got to say that this book really grew on me while I read it. For the first couple of chapters I kept wondering when the story was going to pick up pace but I grew to appreciate the pace of the story telling. The slower pace made the events feel more realistic, the main character/narrator Gerry is a journalist not a policeman so he doesn't have a team of people to help him make discoveries, and he doesn't have access to all of the details. He makes his discoveries slowly; a newspaper story that doesn't make sense, unusual phone numbers, a policeman who hears thing. The reader gets to feel the frustration that Gerry feels at the lack of progress, this helped me connect with Gerry, I could understand why he had to miss a few of his sons' events, I could see why his marriage fell apart and what could happen to his current relationship without it needing to be spelt out in plain letters.

McIlvanney is quite heavy on the description in parts of this book which I know isn't to everybody's taste, but as somebody who hasn't yet lived in Glasgow or even a city of a similar size for a reasonable length of time I found the detail helped me with getting to grips with elements of the plot and picturing the locations in my mind's eye.

All in all this is decent crime novel, and I'd say this book is well worth a read, especially during a holiday or when you're on a long journey, where you can appreciate the pacing of the plot. Although I haven't read the first book of the trilogy yet I'm going to tentatively recommend reading it and working through the books as the character and story development were really quite enjoyable once I got into the book properly.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
There is a surprising amount of description, of scene setting in Liam McIlvanney's novels but so beautifully done that, when noticed, I sigh with envy at his observation and ability to convey such to the reader. Taut, tight-plotted right to the very end and thoroughly entertaining.
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By atticusfinch1048 TOP 500 REVIEWER on 5 Sept. 2013
Format: Paperback
This is the second in Liam McIIvanney's Conway mysteries and this is a fine example of what a crime thriller should be about. There is a wonderful pulsating pace throughout the book as the Glasgow underworld and all that brings weaves its way through the pages of the novel.

Gerry Conway is the Political Editor of the Sunday Tribune after an enforced absence due to his previous role as the Crime Editor and bringing down a politician and a Gangland Godfather. He looks with some jealousy at his friend and colleague Martin Moir who now holds that job. It is not until he starts to worry about why he has not seen his friend for a few days that things start falling in to place, and when he is found dead it is Gerry who is pressing the police for action, as he runs a counter investigation.

While doing the two jobs of politics and crime while investigating his friends death that brings him in to contact with the leaders of rival crime mobs, which brings him to contact with the leadership of Glasgow City Council. At the same time we are brought in to contact with a lot of "Glasgow baggage", sectarian football support, the split up of the rival gangs, the UVF and UDA, eastern European prostitutes and heroin.

Like all investigative crime journalists this brings him to the attention of all the major players in crime and politics, which always seem entwined, which in turn always means a funeral or two. Conway is so concerned about his own safety and the protection of his own family he has to watch as his partner goes to her parents in New Zealand and his ex-wife's husband accepts a job in Aberdeen.

This is a wonderful crime thriller. But the thrill of this crime novel is in everything that builds to the ending like a crescendo of thunder and lightening.
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