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Where the Action Is: The Foundations of Embodied Interaction (MIT Press) by [Dourish, Paul]
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Where the Action Is: The Foundations of Embodied Interaction (MIT Press) Kindle Edition

4.7 out of 5 stars 3 customer reviews

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Length: 252 pages Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled Page Flip: Enabled
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Product Description

Review

"Engagingly written...."-- R. Keith Sawyer, "Philosophical Psychology"

About the Author

Paul Dourish is Professor of Informatics at the University of California, Irvine, with courtesy appointments in Computer Science and in Anthropology.

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 1129 KB
  • Print Length: 252 pages
  • Publisher: The MIT Press; New Ed edition (20 Aug. 2004)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B002Z7DZYY
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
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  • Word Wise: Not Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars 3 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #767,897 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Critical reading for HCI, CSCW ubiquitous computing. Especially relevant if you think you've figured out what usability research is -- it might teach you a few useful things about the nature of human action and the implications for how to design -- and how not to.
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Format: Hardcover
Dourish book is both impressively well written with a fluent comprehensible language and offers insights to the challenging work of designing interfaces. By introducing the perspective of phenomenology to Human Computer Interaction (HCI) Paul Dourish sheds new light on important concepts such as appropriation, intersubjectivity, awareness, and embodied interaction. All of which are key issues when designing user interfaces. This book book should be mandatory as well as plesurably reading for everybody involved or interested in designing computer systems.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This is a book about design and philosophical issues in the field of Human Computer Interaction (HCI). The author examines how computer systems, when thought of as technical entities, are essentially "underdefined", since in the end they are always designed for people. He also looks at how modern phenomenology (a strand of modern philosophy) and social anthropology offer us methods to move towards an embodied, encultured approach to HCI design.

Particularly interesting is the informed discussion of various computer development models in which human users can use real objects to stand for themselves. For example, the "Illuminating Light" application for testing hologram-making scenarios uses "phicons": physical icons such as mock beam-splitters, laser sources and mirrors which also represent their "computer" meaning in the system. These phicons "stand for themselves" - as the user moves them around a table, the software calculates beam angles and displays those via a projector onto the same table, thus making the user experience of testing holography set ups more tangible and intuitive. (Side note - holography set-up is a tricky old business, at least for this reviewer, so this application would also be useful outside of mere "prototype" contexts).

The book contains lots of example scenarios, the author draws particularly on experiences from his career in "innovative software" development with Xerox plc. In this way, the book manages to stay relevant from an engineering design perspective.
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