Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

Kindle Price: £5.49

Save £4.50 (45%)

includes VAT*
* Unlike print books, digital books are subject to VAT.

These promotions will be applied to this item:

Some promotions may be combined; others are not eligible to be combined with other offers. For details, please see the Terms & Conditions associated with these promotions.

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

When The Rivers Run Dry: What Happens When Our Water Runs Out? by [Pearce, Fred]
Kindle App Ad

When The Rivers Run Dry: What Happens When Our Water Runs Out? Kindle Edition

4.5 out of 5 stars 17 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
£5.49

Length: 368 pages Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled Page Flip: Enabled

Kindle Books from 99p
Load up your Kindle library before your next holiday -- browse over 500 Kindle Books on sale from 99p until 31 August, 2016. Shop now

Product Description

Review

"If ever a book has been written that demands to be read it is this one. This is that rare thing - a journey through a hugely important and complex subject in the company of a natural storyteller who makes you feel intelligent." (Tim Smit)

"Of all the travel books I have ever read this is the most frightening, the most inspiring and the most important...A book every politician must be made to read and understand." (David Bellamy)

"Environmental journalist Fred Pearce's book, When the Rivers Run Dry could not be better timed" (Robin McKie The Observer)

"...Pearce argues powerfully that unless mankind can rethink its whole attitude towards the use and misuse of resource, the consequence could be famine, pestilence and even war for huge numbers of human beings." (Trevor Grove Daily Mail)

"Veteran science writer Pearce (Turning Up the Heat) makes a strong - and scary - case that a worldwide water shortage is the most fearful looming environmental crisis. With a drumbeat of facts both horrifc...and fascinating...the former New Scientist news editor documents a 'kind of cataclysm' already affecting many of the world's great rivers." (Publishers Weekly)

Book Description

Drought is THE environmental issue of the 21st century and Fred Pearce provides us with the most complete portrait yet of the causes of this global crisis.

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 1367 KB
  • Print Length: 368 pages
  • Publisher: Transworld Digital (31 Jan. 2012)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B006N5OTOE
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Not Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars 17 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #203,215 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
  •  Would you like to give feedback on images or tell us about a lower price?


Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
. . . until there's not a drop to drink. Rivers, such as the Rio Grande and Colorado in the US, the Aral Sea in Russia and the deep aquifers in India are disappearing. Human use, particularly for large-scale agriculture, is drawing more water than Nature can replenish. Water is being channeled, impeded or diverted, and contained. The result is the natural flow of water being severely altered in places around the world. In this captivating and rather disturbing account, Fred Pearce describes how the flow has been altered by us and what the results of our tampering portends.

Pearce is not afaid of numbers. Think for a moment of what a "cubic kilometre" of water suggests. What lies about a kilometre from your house? Project that distance sideways and upward and envision the area filled with water. Multiply that by 10, by 100, then consider those amounts flowing by every minute, every day, every year. The image can only be called "imposing". These are the values the author deals with in describing rivers, underground aquifers, diversion canals and hydroelectric dams. Too often, the number that was and the one that is today are drastically different.

Once, irrigation was the diversion of a small portion of a river's content. Now, entire rivers pour into fields for crops. Much of that water seeps away unused or evaporates. When there are many farmers "abstracting" water, legally or illegally, Pearce notes, the result is deprivation elsewhere. Treaties written to share water resources may be rendered invalid by such abstractions, since natural replenishment cannot keep pace. The Nile has been a source of contention for millennia. Even the British Isles, usually considered eternally green and damp, is suffering droughts.
Read more ›
Comment 9 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
We can do without oil.... well if we work hard to.

We can't do without water, and despite the earth having 1.4 bn cubic kilometers of it, 97% of the water is sea water that we cannot drink.

forget washing the car, or flushing the loo, do you realise it takes 5,000 litres of water to grow 1 kilo of rice?

Or a kilo of coffee a massive 20,000 litres of water?

We need to think about how we live and the impact of how we live and make changes now.

Very glad I read the book - I would recommend it to everybody.
Comment 8 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
This is one of those books that has a point to make but does it by presenting the facts and allows you to draw your own conclusions. It is very relevent to the UK at the moment with hose pipe bans in the SEast etc.

I was shocked to read that so many rivers now don't actually make it to the sea anymore, ie the Yellow River in China, the RIO Grande in the US, the list goes on and on. Fred Pearce also presents the analysis of how much water each country is using to grow stuff, ie up to 5000 litres to grow 1 kilo of rice that you can buy in Tesco for £1.50, or up to 4,000 litres to water a field to grow grass for a cow to eat and produce 1 litre of milk for 89p is all insane.

Jumping from the UK to Africa to Asia and the US, this is a catalogue of decisions, all made with the best intentions that have actually caused more damage to the people they were supposed to be helping.

It is written in a very readable style and very worth buying just so that you can make your own decisions about how you use water.
Comment 6 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
Fred Pearce gives a clear and insightful account of the how water is used and abused around the world. He doesn't just focus on the envronmental issues but explores the political, social and economical issues of water use. A fantastic read that raises many questions and comes up with some solutions.
Comment 7 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
I found plenty of interesting material in this book although the somewhat journalistic style (read sound-bite) made me feel the need to verify much of what was said. Most of the things that I checked were accurate. Some viewpoints expressed appeared to be the more extreme of those on the net and I wondered whether they were chosen solely for their shock-factor.
That said, overall this is quite a clear laymans guide to a doubtless complex issue and I found a good introduction to a potentially dull topic.
It certainly left me with the desire to know more.
Comment 10 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
... to fill the dry rivers. The "green revolution", introduced primarily in Asia to grow food for ever-growing populations, has been just one of a range of water-guzzling agricultural systems leading to rivers running dry and water tables sinking to dangerous levels. There are others of course, such as water wastage by urban populations and industry. But nothing takes so much of the world's most precious liquid as agriculture. Water, the ultimate renewable resource at the global level, is becoming scarce in many places where it is needed for the survival of plants, animals, and societies. Fred Pearce has criss-crossed the planet investigating a multitude of specific cases where water has literally disappeared and the land been destroyed through salinization, wind erosion and chemical pollution. In others, people continue to waste water for short-term profit as if nobody else was needing some of it. Many books are appearing on water scarcity and explaining how necessary new thinking on water management is needed at all levels, Pearce takes a direct approach and personalizes his findings. He imparts his discussions with local farmers, community and business leaders, environmental protection agents, politicians and scientists. The approach makes this a very accessible book despite the sombre topic. It is not only ample food for thought but also a call for action and participation. He reminds us forcefully "we all live downstream" from somebody else.

Pearce discusses the overexploitation by commercial agriculture of aquifers, water resources that have been stored in the earth for thousands of years. Cotton and water-intensive crops like rice and alfalfa [for fodder] are being grown despite the dramatically sinking water tables.
Read more ›
Comment 4 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews

click to open popover