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When the Music's Over: Story of Political Pop Hardcover – 20 Mar 1989


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Hardcover, 20 Mar 1989
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Product details

  • Hardcover: 320 pages
  • Publisher: Faber & Faber (20 Mar. 1989)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 9780571153800
  • ISBN-13: 978-0571153800
  • ASIN: 0571153801
  • Product Dimensions: 2.5 x 2.5 x 2.5 cm
  • Average Customer Review: Be the first to review this item
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 993,578 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
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Product description

Synopsis

This book sets out to examine the history of post-war political pop from the McCarthy era to Live Aid and from Ewan MacColl to Red Wedge. The story includes the anti-communist witch-hunts of the 50s, the Civil Rights and Vietnam campaigns of the 60s, the Rock against Racism Movement of the 70s and the close connection between pop and politics in the Caribbean, Africa, Greece and Russia - areas where the authorities have often made it clear that they regard music as a potentially subversive force. In the 80s, when people apparently became more escapist than ever, there have been songs, records, concerts and campaigns supporting causes from anti-apartheid to Amnesty, the Labour Party to the Sandinistas, and the author attempts to use this colourful if confused scene as a starting point.


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