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When Hitler Stole Pink Rabbit Paperback – 1 Jan 1974

4.7 out of 5 stars 348 customer reviews

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Paperback, 1 Jan 1974
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Product details

  • Paperback: 272 pages
  • Publisher: HarperCollinsChildren'sBooks; New edition edition (1974)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0006708013
  • ISBN-13: 978-0006708018
  • Product Dimensions: 19.2 x 12.8 x 1.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (348 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 551,154 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

“A compassionate introduction to the whole subject of World War II” – Books for your Children

“An extremely exciting adventure story.” – Daily Express

“A charming and touching book, often very funny” – Daily Mail

“Exact, intelligent and unsentimental.” – Sunday Telegraph

--This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

From the Back Cover

''It was a small piece of red enamel with a black hooked cross on it. "It's called a swastika," said Gunther, "all the Nazis have them."''

Anna is too busy with schoolwork and tobogganing to listen to the grown-ups' talk of Hitler. But one day she and her brother are rushed out of Germany in alarming secrecy, away from everything they know. Their father is wanted by the Nazis – dead or alive. It is the start of a huge adventure, sometimes frightening, very often funny, and always, always exciting.

Judith Kerr was born in Berlin and left Germany in 1993 to escape the Nazis. Her novels are based on her own experience.

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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
Anna is nine and is far to busy with schoolwork, tobogganing and making important decisions about whether wood yo-yos, are better than tin, to do more than notice the posters of the man who has a moustache like Charlie Chaplin. It isn't until one morning she finds her papa has disappeared that she starts to listen to the grownups talk of Hitler, elections and Anna's Jewish background. And then one afternoon she comes home from school to discover her missing father is uneasy over their safety and they must go to Zurich that very week to meet him that she realises how serious the threat of Hitler is.
It is the story of a lost childhood and the dissent from fame and wealth to poverty and having a price on your head. It is the story of four lives destroyed by the Nazis. And it is a true story.
It is one of the best books written about World War Two it shows the funny sad side of a childhood destroyed by hate. And the difficulties of French and English to a nine year old girl from Berlin whose mother who can't cook. This is a Brilliant book as are the sequels The Other Way Round and A Small Person Far Away. Lovers of 'Anne Franks Diary' and all the Michael Magorian's books will revel in this book of courage, pain and growing up.
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By A Customer on 10 Mar. 2001
Format: Paperback
I saw this book on display in a local bookshop and was interested by the title. I picked it up and read the first couple of chapters in the shop. I was so mezmerized by it I had to buy it and once I got it home I could not put it down. The book really displys the innocence of childhood and really shows that things that can happen in life can be just as traumatic and confusing to children as they can for adults. it is a dramatic sometimes funny,sometimes poignantly sad book that takes your right into the world, and at times the suffering, innocent people had to endure because of their faith or beleifs. This book is beautifully written and I would advise any parent to let their children read this book it will teach them a lot about tolerance. A suitable book for any age not just children - I enjoyed this book from start to finish - and I'm 31!!!! I will be buying the next two in the series and then will give them to my neice to read.
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Format: Paperback
I totaly adore this book! My mum bought this for me when I was nine (just like Anna), and I have totaly read it to pieces.

Max and Anna's father is a famous Jewish writer, but when the Nazis come into power they must leave everything and flee, first to a village in Switzerland, then to Paris and finaly to London. All the time getting poorer and poorer.

One of the best parts is when she worries about not being able to become an auther because she hasn't had a diffecult enough chidhood!
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Format: Paperback
I really love this book, it is so heart touching, interesting and has a touch of fun in it! It is about WW2. I am 11 and after reading this book I immediately reccomended it to my friends. Whenever someone would ask me "what's your favourite book?" I would immediately answer "when hitter stole pink rabbit". I think you would too, after reading this book. This book is written in a 9 year old girls point of view who travels to different country's to escape from the nazis. Another great fact, is that the writer, Judith Kerr, was in this condition at the same age. She is writing how she felt then towards the war but just at a different person. Another reason I love this book so much, is because of the girls behavier towards the war. In normal books about war, the story would be very tragic and scary. Whereas in this case, the girl feels completely different. She faces life as an adventure. Not just a terrible nightmare. Every step she goes, she continues believing in herself and having fun and learning. Although the war isn't very exciting she tries her best to make it as exciting as she can. I find her a very inspiring girl to look up to even if I'm older! She's always looking up, always hoping and never gives up. That (to me) is what makes this book so great and different. The name is strange: "when hitter stole pink rabbit". It is very catchy, but doesn't mention much about the rabbit. The only part it is mentioned, is when she leaves her pink rabbit behind and the nazis take it and she feels sad for a while. I hope you've been persuaded to buy this book! There is anotherp great ww2 book I reccomend, this is much more tragic and sad, it is named the "the silver sword". I reccomend you read this book and see if you're ready for something more sad.
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By Bernie VINE VOICE on 1 July 2013
Format: Hardcover
Anna only knows she is Jewish because her father says so. However it is enough to force the family to flee Germany (1933) due to the on coming of the Nazi regime. She will travel to several countries learning the language and staying one step ahead of the spreading Nazi influence. In her travels she learns of many concepts which include the confiscation of her "Pink Rabbit."

Many books unintentionally talk down to children. Not this book it looks you right in the eye. Anna still maintains the innocence of her youth. But the problems and dealing with people can happen at any age.

The story is told from the perspective of Anna. And not too surprisingly it parallels that of the author and illustrator Judith Kerr who was forced to leave Germany in 1933.

The Tiger Who Came to Tea
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