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When Experiments Travel: Clinical Trials and the Global Search for Human Subjects Paperback – 17 May 2009

4.5 out of 5 stars 2 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Paperback: 272 pages
  • Publisher: Princeton University Press; 1 edition (17 May 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0691126577
  • ISBN-13: 978-0691126579
  • Product Dimensions: 15.2 x 1.8 x 23.1 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 664,931 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

Product Description

Review

Obama administration officials wondering what to expect from this brewing storm should consult Adriana Petryna's new book "When Experiments Travel", which deals with the global clinical trials industry, especially in low-income and middle-income countries.--Helen Epstein "The Lancet "

She succeeds in presenting a balanced set of viewpoints on a variety of concerns about recruiting practices, informed consent, drug safety, the blurring of lines between clinical practice and research, and issues of distributive justice such as drug pricing and access.--K.H. Jacobsen "Choice "

In "When Experiments Travel", Adriana Petryna has written a timely book. It provides an important anthropological perspective on the issues surrounding clinical trials and how to make medical research more transparent and accessible to the general public.--Dinesh Sharma "Health Affairs "

[S]cholars of the social organization of medicine would appreciate this book for the window it provides into treatment. . . . The book is also an important information source for economic sociologists interested in how a new industry is recontextualized into distant political and professional regimes. Finally, it should be appreciated for the insight it offers into the production of a form of evidence onto which a remarkable amount of importance is placed in contemporary medicine.--Daniel Menchik "Qualitative Sociology "

"When Experiments Travel" is a provocative look inside the outsourcing of clinical trials. The issues that it raises are complex and profound. Hopefully, it will spawn further empirical work and influence the terms of the ongoing debate surrounding the ethics and regulation of international research.--Alex John London "IRB Ethics and Human Research "


"When Experiments Travel" is a provocative look inside the outsourcing of clinical trials. The issues that it raises are complex and profound. Hopefully, it will spawn further empirical work and influence the terms of the ongoing debate surrounding the ethics and regulation of international research.--Alex John London "IRB Ethics and Human Research "


Obama administration officials wondering what to expect from this brewing storm should consult Adriana Petryna's new book "When Experiments Travel", which deals with the global clinical trials industry, especially in low-income and middle-income countries.
--Helen Epstein "The Lancet "


She succeeds in presenting a balanced set of viewpoints on a variety of concerns about recruiting practices, informed consent, drug safety, the blurring of lines between clinical practice and research, and issues of distributive justice such as drug pricing and access.
--K.H. Jacobsen "Choice "


In "When Experiments Travel", Adriana Petryna has written a timely book. It provides an important anthropological perspective on the issues surrounding clinical trials and how to make medical research more transparent and accessible to the general public.
--Dinesh Sharma "Health Affairs "



"When Experiments Travel" is a provocative look inside the outsourcing of clinical trials. The issues that it raises are complex and profound. Hopefully, it will spawn further empirical work and influence the terms of the ongoing debate surrounding the ethics and regulation of international research.
--Alex John London "IRB Ethics and Human Research "


[S]cholars of the social organization of medicine would appreciate this book for the window it provides into treatment. . . . The book is also an important information source for economic sociologists interested in how a new industry is recontextualized into distant political and professional regimes. Finally, it should be appreciated for the insight it offers into the production of a form of evidence onto which a remarkable amount of importance is placed in contemporary medicine.
--Daniel Menchik "Qualitative Sociology "

"In "When Experiments Travel", Adriana Petryna has written a timely book. It provides an important anthropological perspective on the issues surrounding clinical trials and how to make medical research more transparent and accessible to the general public."--Dinesh Sharma, "Health Affairs"

Honorable Mention for the 2014 Diana Forsythe Prize, Committee on the Anthropology of Science, Technology, and Computing of the General Anthropology Division, and the Society for the Anthropology of Work


Honorable Mention for the 2014 Diana Forsythe Prize, Committee on the Anthropology of Science, Technology, and Computing of the General Anthropology Division, and the Society for the Anthropology of Work


"Obama administration officials wondering what to expect from this brewing storm should consult Adriana Petryna's new book "When Experiments Travel," which deals with the global clinical trials industry, especially in low-income and middle-income countries."--Helen Epstein, "The Lancet"

"She succeeds in presenting a balanced set of viewpoints on a variety of concerns about recruiting practices, informed consent, drug safety, the blurring of lines between clinical practice and research, and issues of distributive justice such as drug pricing and access."--K.H. Jacobsen, "Choice"

"In "When Experiments Travel," Adriana Petryna has written a timely book. It provides an important anthropological perspective on the issues surrounding clinical trials and how to make medical research more transparent and accessible to the general public."--Dinesh Sharma, "Health Affairs"

""When Experiments Travel" is a provocative look inside the outsourcing of clinical trials. The issues that it raises are complex and profound. Hopefully, it will spawn further empirical work and influence the terms of the ongoing debate surrounding the ethics and regulation of international research."--Alex John London, "IRB Ethics and Human Research"

"[S]cholars of the social organization of medicine would appreciate this book for the window it provides into treatment. . . . The book is also an important information source for economic sociologists interested in how a new industry is recontextualized into distant political and professional regimes. Finally, it should be appreciated for the insight it offers into the production of a form of evidence onto which a remarkable amount of importance is placed in contemporary medicine."--Daniel Menchik, "Qualitative Sociology"

From the Back Cover

"This thoughtful and reflective book offers us a sobering account of the spread of clinical research in a world without borders and often without norms. Based on careful comparative anthropological research, it both casts light on a gray zone where research, medicine, and capitalism merge, and provides a first-rate example of how an anthropology for the twenty-first century can contribute to our understanding and to the public good."--Paul Rabinow, author of "Marking Time"

"This superb book provides the best overview of the pharmaceutical industry's rush to move clinical trials to developing countries, and the intensely troubling moral, political, economic, and cultural issues this effort raises. Petryna's argument is balanced and compelling, and her case studies are riveting."--Arthur Kleinman, M.D., Harvard University

"This is a very important book, notable for its novel subject, innovative approach, and seriousness. A singular contribution to the anthropology of science and medicine."--Veena Das, Johns Hopkins University

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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
This is an important book which explains the rationale behind pharmaceutical trials given the global markets, and the demands for more information about the effects of new drugs on human subjects.
It can also be viewed as an explanation of the marketisation of the human body, and why some bodies are more available, more suitable and more persuadable for research purposes. The author shows clearly how the demands of the consumer society can be harnessed to expedite drug trials in some developing areas of the world and the book raises important questions about the sustainability of the 'gold standards' of clinical trials
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Format: Paperback
The book was in excellent shape even though I bought it used. I didn't give it 5 stars as it arrived a little late. But I was overall very happy with the item.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 4.1 out of 5 stars 7 reviews
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars If you have ever wondered how unsafe drugs make their ... 14 Feb. 2015
By Karen Batres - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
If you have ever wondered how unsafe drugs make their way into the market, or if you have ever tried to get into a clinical trial, or if you wonder how risky clinical trials are, this book is for you. The author has travelled, interviewed, and read widely in order to gather her research (it's clear, for example, that if you have a heart attack, you'd do well to have it in Warsaw!). But there is a caveat here: this book is academic in nature and is not a page-turner in the usual sense. The information is pure gold, but you will on occasion have to plow through the bloated language of social anthropology. That said, once you get used to doing so, this is the stuff of both nightmare and hope. Clinical trials are subject to all the flaws of any human endeavor, and as awful as some of the flaws are, there are also efforts to correct the flaws, protect people, and ensure safe drugs. The book puts a whole new light on "informed consent"--basically, we aren't very informed and in some trials, information is withheld. As future or current patients, this book is a treasure.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Though provoking 22 Jan. 2014
By Nancy P. Goldschmidt - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Interesting read about the pharm industry, and the clinical trials around the globe. Easy to read. provides perspective about equity in health care arond the globe.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great 5 Mar. 2013
By doctorG - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I needed it for a research paper, and it has great information relevant to a lack of patient protection in clinical trials.
3.0 out of 5 stars Great information - but sometimes annoying writing style! 30 Aug. 2015
By Jan Reinhardt - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
The content of the book is great and every MD should read it in my opinion.

However , sometimes I was really upset with the writing style. The author often uses meaningless or unimportant statements to validate him/herself, which are sometimes quite annoying.
"During the summers of 2003-2006, I worked in southern Brazil with industry-sponsored researchers and with physicians carrying out publicly sponsored research in a public university hospital. Over the years, I also engaged with academic scientists, policy makers, state prosecutors, and citizens ..." on page 18
"In my ethnographic work with various professionals within the contract research organizations (CRO) community (including company founders and clinical trial managers), the physicians with whom CROs contract, and pharmaceutical consultants ..." on page 32
7 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars My takeaway 25 Sept. 2009
By Sylvia - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
My takeaway from this engaging and careful reporting is to be very very careful of any new drug, and to wonder, yet again, at how greed trumps wellbeing in the pharmaceutical industry, as we experience the "pharmaceuticalization of health care"
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