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What to Eat: Food that's good for your health, pocket and plate Hardcover – 1 Mar 2012

4.5 out of 5 stars 51 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Hardcover: 400 pages
  • Publisher: Fourth Estate (1 Mar. 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0007341423
  • ISBN-13: 978-0007341429
  • Product Dimensions: 14.1 x 3 x 22.2 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (51 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 303,097 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

‘Joanna Blythman has one of the sanest food heads in the Western World – and this brilliant book encapsulates her admirably clear thinking in a wonderfully accessible, entertaining way. Everyone who cares what they eat and how they feed their family – that’s all of us, right? – should read it.’ Hugh Fearnley Whittingstall

'A rare book, practical, sensible, and passionate. Joanna Blythman writes with clarity, sanity and humanity. Anyone interested in food and cooking should read it.' Matthew Fort

‘A succinct and badly needed encyclopaedia of facts and common sense on food and nutrition for which I am truly grateful. The introduction alone is worth the price of the book.’ Darina Allen

‘Everyone who cares about what they eat and how they feed their family should read this’ Daily Mail

About the Author

Joanna Blythman is Britain's leading investigative food journalist and an influential commentator on the British food chain. She has won five Glenfiddich awards for her writing, including a Glenfiddich Special Award for her first book The Food We Eat, a Caroline Walker Media Award for Improving the Nation's Health by Means of Good Food, and a Guild of Food Writers Award for The Food We Eat. In 2004, she won the prestigious Derek Cooper Award, one of BBC Radio 4's Food and Farming Awards. In 2007, Good Housekeeping Magazine gave her its award for Outstanding Contribution to Food Award 2007. She writes and broadcasts frequently on food issues.


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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
I got a copy as soon as I could because I loved other books by this author, especially Shopped.
Ever since I dipped my nose into it, I haven't been able to put it down. If you only buy one food book ever, this is the one to go for.
This is the book I have been waiting for. It approaches the vexed subject of how to eat well- and thoughtfully- in a wonderfully common sense, yet highly authoritative way.
I particularly liked the introductory '20 principles of eating well'. This reminded me somewhat of Michael Pollan's Food Rules, but is of more practical use because it goes into more detail and is written for a UK audience.
Blythman writes with great knowledge, clarity, passion and not a little humour. She seems to understand very well all the questions that we ask of food these days, especially the problem of balancing our foodie and ethical aspirations with economic realities.
The book is all-embracing in that it looks at food from all angles. It contains an astonishing amount of different types of well-digested information about food- everything from health, animal welfare, to ethical concerns- but it is so accessible and readable, you want to read it, rather than thinking 'That's useful' and leaving it for another day.
A great read and a really important contribution to our food awareness.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
WARNING - the good reviews of this book are for the physical book, not the Kindle version. How do I know? Because most of the Kindle version is, quite literally, unreadable. One of the reviewers mentions the "orange writing", and I think this is the source of the problem. This book is completely unsuitable for the Kindle because it hasn't been formatted for the Kindle, the digital version of the book has just been taken and put into basic Kindle format. Not good enough and simply not fit for purpose. Don't waste your money.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Yes we're all tired of being told "eat this", "don't eat that", to the point where we're negative about food and have come to view it as a task, a guilty sin, a risk.

The reason you should read this book is because it's a positive, clear-headed, rational-minded antidote to all the rubbish we've heard about food - from the industry, but also from well-meaning but misguided scaremongers. It's a fundamentally moderate book, and is not preachy or condescending. Given the weight it punches in terms of research and good sense, that in itself is a huge triumph.

Refreshingly, its core message is a positive one: that we should strive to eat basic, honest, simple, traditional foods, and know what we're eating. It's a celebration of all that's good about real food and dismisses myth and fear simply with facts. The book draws our attention to the hidden value, as well as the hidden costs, in the food we by, and in that sense it's a great education and one we should all embrace.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I have bought two previous books by this author. I respect the quality of her research, the easy-to-read prose and her opinions - even where I do not agree with them! She remains one of the few campaigning food journalist, who covers practical as well as 'political'issues. I think we are what we eat - so being reliably better informed is certainly worth the cover price.
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Format: Hardcover
What to Eat: Food that's good for your health, pocket and plate

This is a highly enjoyable book full of interesting advice and information. The 20 principles of eating, made simple is an inspired but commonsensical guide to buying and eating good food. In it she debunks many of the things we've been brought up to believe about what constitutes good and healthy food. It turns out much of what we have been told by the government food scientists and nutritionalists is wrong. So butter, whole/ full milk, eggs etc., are good for you (as the older generation knew all along). In fact it turns out most natural food are. The call to buying organic, high welfare, local, non processed foods is convincingly argued and one I needed little persuading on.

What good about this book is that it builds on the points made in the introduction about principles of eating to give useful, empowering information on how to buy specific food ingredients and getting the most out of them. I liked the way she covers each type of food and ingredient - background information, what you should look out for when buying, things to do with the product etc. All this is very clearly explained and presented.

I highly recommend this book to anyone wanting to be better informed on the food choices they make. For me it was an unputdownable read and it has certainly inspired me to think again about what I buy and eat.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I bought this book after reading an article in the Guardian on the authors work which really resonated with me. Knowing which foods have particularly negative impacts on the planet to help more informed choices along with which ones are better or worse for you are often cited in isolation but having them in one place is really useful.

It's a great book to dip in and out of flicking to a random page and reading for example why different types of potatoes are better or worse.

My big but is that so much of the writing is based on the opinion of the author as opposed to fact, even though I share her principals. She even makes the point that we have become "obsessed with proof" just because something isn't proven scientifically doesn't mean you shouldn't believe it - well actually thats kinda the point, of you know, science.

So while I agree with the author too much of this book is opinion
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