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Weekend [1967] [DVD]

3.9 out of 5 stars 22 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Actors: Mireille Darc, Jean Yanne
  • Directors: Jean-Luc Godard
  • Format: Anamorphic, PAL, Widescreen
  • Language: French
  • Subtitles: English
  • Region: Region 2 (This DVD may not be viewable outside Europe. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Classification: 18
  • Studio: Artificial Eye
  • DVD Release Date: 28 Feb. 2005
  • Run Time: 99 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (22 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B0000AQVIR
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 18,538 in DVD & Blu-ray (See Top 100 in DVD & Blu-ray)

Product Description

A bickering, scheming bourgeois couple leave Paris for the French countryside to claim an inheritance by nefarious means. Almost immediately, they become entangled in a cataclysmic traffic jam, which is just the beginning of a journey fraught with violent and dangerous encounters: rape, murder, pillage and even cannibalism. Famed for its virtuoso cinematography - including a stunning ten minute tracking shot - Godard s dystopian road movie is a ferocious attack on consumerism.

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: DVD
I must say that this is one of the funniest and most disturbing films I've seen in a while.
I got my Jean Luc Goddard film "Weekend" and boy I wasn't disapointed - it's at times disorganised chaos and at times it is almost like a series of films within a film.
There's canabalism, murder, revolutionary speak, road rage, neighbour rage, child rage, a pig killing, political monologs that boggled my brain, a 3 mile or 20 minute plus single take tracking shot (one of the best bits), Death of a goose, rape, over 10,000 degree (in 1 take) tracking shot, disembowelment, the statement : "When Roland drives your Father home from the clinic... it would be nice if they both died in an accident.", a chess game.
I recomend this to anyone with an open mind that leans towards the surrealist avant-garde.
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Format: VHS Tape
Fight Club wasn't the first movie to take on consumer culture. Godard's last narrative film of the 1960s is a harsh, at times unenjoyable, but always radical and challenging tale of a society mad for money and indifferent to suffering. Turning the usual young-lovers-on-the-run plot used by Godard in Pierrot le Fou and hinted at in A Bout de Souffle, Le Week-End has two lovers who hate each other rushing to the countryside to fight over an inheritance. If the road in classic young lovers' tales - like the contemporaneous Bonnie and Clyde - symbolised freedom, here, cluttered up with wreckage, the road is just another part of a culture where anxieites are bottled up during the week, and let out at the weekend, with violent results. Trademark Godardian intertitles abound, and this film is about as didactic as it gets. Anti-Vietnam slogans may not be contemporaneous, but this film, as an indictment of the new world order, and of consumerism, is more modern than anything currently in cinemas. A classic that's hard to love.
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One of the most essential, challenging, brave and provocative films ever made from the legend French director. This can be difficult to watch, confusing, bizarre, but actually a very intelligent, engaging film about consumerism, politics, society and still very relevant ever since it was made decades ago now.
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I think that the other commentators have failed to fully understand the movie. I believe that it is a metaphor for the collapse of bourgeois (capitalist) society and works by explaining what will come of that society under standard marxist analysis.

They begin their journey, self-absorbed, greedy, murderous, horrid. They go through the rat-race of traffic along the way. They end up getting robbed, losing their car crashing it and wandering lost. All hope of returning is gone. They end up arrested by the revolutionaries (the dictatorship of the proletariat), suffer cultural re-education (to the extent that the female character eats the male one). The role of the Algerian and African characters are important in that they represent the positivity of the third-world leadership which Jean Luc Godard revered so much. The movie is a very hard Maoist metaphor.

The movie itself is well shot, thought-provoking and harsh. It is meant to reflect the harshness of this world and the director's belief in how that system will be overthrown.
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I first saw this aged 17 late night on TV, sound turned down so my parents wouldn't come down and send me to bed. Unfortunately, TV doesn't show films like this any more (not that there are any others) so today's teenagers will mostly miss the opportunity to feel shocked and affronted in the manner of a middle aged vicar. What's difficult is that it's not just viscerally unpleasant but frequently dull and constantly carries an aura of threat that seems to be directed at you the viewer, something along the lines of 'When the revolution comes, you'll be first up against the wall, you bourgeois pig.' - a still pertinent message, though not one we get to hear so much these days. Having decided he doesn't care what you think (an early onscreen text reads 'A film found on a scrapheap'), Godard can do anything he wants and does, resulting in one of the most visually inventive films of all time. There are musical sequences, figures from history and literature, long political disquisitions, virtuoso tracking shots, gunfights, miracles, readings from children's books, random onscreen texts and, as a defining motif, car crashes. After you get past the essentially superstitious feeling that the film is actually threatening to your life, there's really so very much to enjoy. Give yourself a very special treat.
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Weekend (J.-L. Godard), F 1967
When Corinne and Roland hit the road in their flashy Facel Vega to kill Corinne's parents (secretly planning to kill the other later) they run among others into an endless traffic jam and a guerilla to witness the end of civilization. Godard's last traditional movie until 1980 is a Cassandra against uninhibited materialism and future Pol Pots.
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I read somewhere that Salvador Dali once said to some journalist: "Do you know why I am so rich? Because there are so many stupid people in the world!". This is the case with the most of J.L.Godard's "art" outcome (which though never comes even close to what the famous spanish artist did). While some of his earlier efforts (A Bout de Suffle, Mepris, Vivre Sa Vie, Bande a Part) were inovative, interesting and (the most important!) watchable, quite everything what he did after approx. 1966 is boringly pretentious, uninteresting and totally unwatchable crap.The same can be said about "Weekend". It's a poor leftist political masturbation mixed with foolish experimenting and cruel exploitation, having nothing to do with art.J.L.Godard should be the last one to complain about bourgeausie in the western world. His luck that he wasn't born in Maoist China or in Stalinist Russia. I think his political and artistical "bravery" would have been much more modest there, if any at all.
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