Currently unavailable.
We don't know when or if this item will be back in stock.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more

Weathercock

4.7 out of 5 stars 13 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Currently unavailable. We don't know when or if this item will be back in stock.
click to open popover

Special Offers and Product Promotions

Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.




Product details

  • Unknown Binding
  • Publisher: Scribner; 1st Edition, 1st Printing. Soft Back edition (2003)
  • ASIN: B003KHCXEG
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (13 customer reviews)

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
5 star
9
4 star
4
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 13 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
I read I lucifer from Glen Duncan, and enjoyed it. It was a bit hard going in places though, but funny and intelligently written.But,seeing it was a book that he knocked out on the quick, whilst writing Weathercock, it was a pretty good effort! I work in the book trade, and asked Duncan about it, when he came to sign his books. Weathercock though, is something different. Its a far better book - more then just a book about sadism, and the infatuation Domonic Hood has with the mysterious Deborah Black, although this is the on going theme throughout. Its about friendship and kinship with the kids he grows up with - namely Penn and Kelp, and this is something most of us can relate to. What Domonic also has to deal with is his dark side. Whilst his head says he shouldnt, his heart wants to experience the darker side - ie sadism. But, this book makes you feel for Domonic and his turmoil, even though some of what he does is definitely something most of us wouldnt contemplate. Through life, and tragedy, Domonic has to deal with more than the ghosts of dead friends, but also the battle within himself and the lure of perversion.We follow him through his early adult life, and through his search for the seemingly unobtainable father Ignatious Malone, who he feels holds the answers he needs. As a (once) good catholic, it is a struggle within himself to justify what he wants, and what he is doing.
It may seem a deep read, but I couldnt put this book down Duncan has indeed excelled himself, and has written a piece of fiction that you will be thinking about long after you have read it. My mumber one book of this year, for sure.
Comment 15 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
After having read I, Lucifer by Duncan, (which was great, by the way) Idecided I ought to take the plunge into some more of Duncan'sliterature.
Like I, Lucifer, Weathercock offers a dark and disturbing view of humanlife, addressing issues many authors steer well clear of.
Following the life of Dominic Hood, a young Catholic sado-masochist, thisbook offers everything from love to lust, light to dark, goodness andevil, and an exorcism thrown in for good measure.
Though slightly worried about Glen Duncan's state of mind, I thoroughlyenjoyed this book. It's a novel that almost makes you ashamed to like it,because of it's graphic and frankly quite disgusting content. Butunderlying this not-so-cheery exterior is an accurate, and insightfulcommentary on the human exisitence. It gives a view of life that is bothintriguing and disturbing for the character as well as the reader.
Speaking of the characters, they are all very well developed, andinteresting to read about. Father Ignatius Malone, for example, is anextremely mysterious character whose exploits make brilliant reading. AndDominic himself is both lovable and disgusting at the same time, aconflict which he also sees and must overcome within himself.
This is definately not a book for those without strong stomachs. However,if you can get past the scenes which aren't so politically correct, thisis a very enjoyable (despite it's darkness) read. A must read for allliterature fans, and those with a taste for a darker, different view.
Comment 15 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
After laughing my way through I Lucifer, this book was my second Glen Duncan book. Although not as acerbic with wit as I, Lucifer, Weathercock is no less affecting and disturbing.
It's all about the things some people shouldn't want but do, as the main character tries in vain to resist, to pull away and disentangle himself from the black-hole like draw of sadism and in particular the woman who introduces him to this nastier side of life. Just like most people, our anti-hero Dominic Hood feels inquisitive from an early age but with religion looming over him, he feels deep shame about what goes on in his mind, questions his sanity and more importantly the state of his soul. He turns to an enigmatic priest who quickly becomes almost an obsessive figure for Dominic as the priest pops up sparingly throughout the novel and always seems mysterious, leaving Dominic grasping at shadows. As the book follows Dominic through life, he reminisces about his childhood friends and the things they got up to, including a camping trip that is in turns sad,bizarre and funny whilst, as an adult Dominic tries hard to be good but through either sheer chance or deliberate albeit subconscious acts, keeps getting sucked back towards darkness.
The writing is splendid, deep and enthralling, particularly an exorcism scene that is ripe with sometimes disgusting detail. There is no shying away from the bleaker things that occur as Dominic struggles for his soul and, most importantly, despite some of the horrible things he does, you find yourself sympathetic towards his plight. He is a thoroughly believable character in a novel that sometimes pushes the boundaries of inconceivability but always makes you want to read the next chapter..and the next. Never predictable or slow. Always provocative and mesmerizing.
Read more ›
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Glen Duncan can be problematic for some readers, precisely because his books often have an aspect of sexual exploration. This book is a case in point, with one or two quite nasty moments and if sexual frankness offends, don't read him. On the other hand he is a sublime writer, cool, irreverent, supremely controlled and adventurous, sometimes outrageously so. I am a convert. I love his daring; I love his refusal to be cautious. There are plenty of writers merely re-exploring the known and comfortable and he is not afraid to explore the edges of existence, the profane and outrageous limits of a maledictive heart. He does this so elegantly that his infelicities are almost understandable, even while he is taking you to places you might not wish to go. He is so much a master of language, such a seducer, that you don't resist, caught up with the eloquence and beauty, even as you are sometimes brought to the limits of your tolerance.

Weathercock recounts the story of Dominic Hood, from Lancashire schoolboy to publisher's agent in New York. As a boy, the target of a particularly vicious bully, Burke, he meets Father Ignatius Malone who saves him by performing what might have been a miracle, or a misunderstanding. Dominic and Penguin meet as a result of a cruelty performed on Kelp by Burke and their lives will intertwine as they grow up. Malone haunts the novel, even more than an actual ghost, as we segue between Dominic's childhood and a time far into the future where he is living with Holly in New York. But Dominic is not a hero, he is a man in thrall to a beautiful and sadistic woman, the loathesome Deborah Black.

There are some absolutely brilliant pieces of writing in this novel, it is packed with observational wit and is a sheer pleasure to read.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews


Look for similar items by category


Feedback