Enter your mobile number below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.
Getting the download link through email is temporarily not available. Please check back later.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

Kindle Price: £12.34

Save £0.65 (5%)

includes VAT*
* Unlike print books, digital books are subject to VAT.

These promotions will be applied to this item:

Some promotions may be combined; others are not eligible to be combined with other offers. For details, please see the Terms & Conditions associated with these promotions.

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

The Wealth of Nature: Economics as if Survival Mattered by [Greer, John Michael]
Kindle App Ad

The Wealth of Nature: Economics as if Survival Mattered Kindle Edition

4.9 out of 5 stars 7 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
£12.34

Length: 271 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
Page Flip: Enabled

Kindle Books from 99p
Load up your Kindle library before your next holiday -- browse over 500 Kindle Books on sale from 99p until 31 August, 2016. Shop now

Product Description

About the Author

John Michael Greer is a scholar of ecological history, an award-winning author and an internationally renowned Peak Oil theorist whose blog, "The Archdruid Report", has become one of the most widely cited online resources dealing with the future of industrial society. He is a certified Master Conserver, an organic gardener, and has been active in the alternative spirituality movement for more than 25 years.

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 720 KB
  • Print Length: 271 pages
  • Publisher: New Society Publishers (31 May 2011)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B004ZGZBCW
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 4.9 out of 5 stars 7 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #673,745 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
  •  Would you like to give feedback on images or tell us about a lower price?

Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5 stars
5 star
6
4 star
1
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 7 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I've been a reader of Greer's "Archdruid Report" for a few years now - the blog where he first aired and hashed out most if not all the ideas in this book, so let's say I wasn't surprised at anything I read here.

What Greer has done is to synthesise his thinking in the blog and make clear the connections with Adam Smith, E.F. Schumacher and other economists and peak oil thinkers.

In a nutshell, the argument is that the "economy" is actually 3 economies: the primary economy, the goods and services that nature produces and which underpins the other two economies, is ordinarily left out of economic thinking and planning. The secondary economy at the goods and services that are created by humans using the raw materials provided by nature. And the tertiary economy is financial goods and services, money which makes money. This is arguably the least important economy in so far as actually enabling humans to live and achieve a civilized quality of life, and yet it is given precedence over the other two economies.

This leads to the dysfunctional state of affairs that we enjoy today, bringing in global climate change and peak oil along the way.

In addition to well-argued analysis, understandable by any intelligent layman, Greer also posits some interesting ways forward to help correct the current imbalance. From changing the tax regime (to tax primary goods and services, ie. nature's products at the point they come into the human economy stream, and to tax financial transactions, but to take tax off secondary economy goods and services - no more income tax, sales tax, etc), to punishing corporate criminality in the same way as we do personal criminality (i.e.
Read more ›
Comment 6 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
A very accessible, well-written book about what is fundamentally wrong with our economics and the economy of the modern world. It is non-technical and jargon-free. It explains why we have got into the situation we are in with 'hallucinatory' money having become by far the largest section of the economies of developed countries and how this is becoming disastrously out-of-step with the realities of the resources available from the physical world, in particular the availability of fossil-fuels. He charts the road ahead in a contracting economy after the 'age of abundance' which has effectively come to an end and makes some very sound suggestions for measures that could be taken by governments, communities and individuals to cope with the difficult times we are in and the even more difficult times that lie ahead. Buy this book and buy an extra copy and send it to your MP - this book could help make a difference to our future.
Comment 4 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
A welcome recognition of the need for realism in economic thinking such as the fact that laws of physics such as those related to entropy have the final say.
Although the 2005 peak oil is questionable, the underlying argument is well worth heeding.
Perhaps a later work can give due consideration to economic rent such as with land value taxation.
Reading this book gets you thinking again about your assumptions and conclusions. Given the state of the world that is not a bad thing!
Comment 5 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
"The Wealth of Nature" is another tour de force by John Michael Greer, the independent scholar and Archdruid who authored books on everything from the Hermetic kabbalah to peak oil. This particular book is similar in many ways to "The Long Descent", which is probably Greer's most important work (unless you like kabbalah!).

"The Wealth of Nature" is explicitly inspired by E. F. Schumacher's "Small is beautiful". Like his mentor, Greer calls for a radical "greening" of economics, making a sharp distinction between three different economies. The primary economy is Nature itself, with all its energy sources, including the non-renewable ones. The secondary economy consists of the actual goods and services produced and consumed, while money (so seemingly all-important) are relegated to the tertiary economy.

While the book is too short to present a fully-fledged "economic theory", it's clear that Greer sees the economic crises of modern civilization to be ultimately driven by a disconnect between the three sectors, especially between the primary and the tertiary economy. The system uses up or squanders enormous quantities of non-renewable energy sources, oil in particular, all the while the money economy becomes both more parasitical and more illusory. Attempts to solve the crisis by flooding the economy with cheap credit might make sense if energy is still abundant, but in a post-peak world, it simply makes matters worse.

Greer doesn't believe that our economic system is viable, and predicts its gradual decline and collapse as people will be forced to revert to more self-reliant lifestyles, family-based production of basic foodstuffs and much lower salaries. Governments and corporations would have to give up many complex, machine- and energy-dependent systems.
Read more ›
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
click to open popover