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We Will Remember Them: Voices from the Aftermath of the Great War Audio Download – Abridged

4.9 out of 5 stars 15 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Audio Download
  • Listening Length: 4 hours and 59 minutes
  • Program Type: Audiobook
  • Version: Abridged
  • Publisher: Orion Publishing Group Limited
  • Audible.co.uk Release Date: 21 Oct. 2009
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B002SQDLV4
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank:

Customer Reviews

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By Amazon Customer TOP 500 REVIEWER on 10 Oct. 2010
Format: Paperback
1918. On the 11th hour of the 11th month at 11.00 am the armistice was signed and the Great War was over. And as the soldiers slowly began to return home, they were finally reunited with their families, many of whom had despaired of ever seeing them again.

But whilst it was a time of great joy for some, others had severe hardships to face. Some had physical disabilities, such as blindness or lost limbs whilst others had mental scars like shell-shock and were haunted by the memories of fallen comrades. And when they were all finally demobbed, work was scarce, so many struggled to find the "land fit for heroes" promised by Lloyd George.

A moving collection of oral testimonies, The Road Home paints a powerful picture of the sacrifices of the ordinary soldier. It is interesting that despite the horrors witnessed and the injuries they sustained, many remained positive about the experience throughout their lives. A deeply poignant and thought-provoking read.
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This book is very powerful and fills a gap left by most books on WW1. It was always unclear to me what happened at the end of the great war. My great grandfather was deeply affected. He had been gassed and had rescued a young lad of the wire. This made a deep impression on me as a youngster. This book has helped me get to know that missing part of his life. A very sad, but thought provoking book. An absolutely must have book that should be read by all.
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Format: Paperback
for anyone interested in the 1st world war.
made up of accounts of people who experienced the war and it's aftermath.
starting with where people were when they heard the Armistice was going to be signed,the comments made you realise what it was like to be in the thick of it then realise at long last the war was coming to an end.
the next chapter was from home loved ones families and solders on leave hearing the good news of the Armistice.
chapter 3 After the battle the big clear up
chapter 4 Demobilization and all the problems that caused.
chapter 5 lives changed forever, some heart rending stories
chapter 6 returning to work
chapter 7 commemoration and reflection.

a book i couldn't put down, i have bought this book for several of my friends.
lots of facts i was unaware of.
spoken by men and women on the ground, well put together with good photos
by Max Arthur
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Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
fascinating,true comments from a wide variety of Service Personnel
who suffered a great many hardships & were not appreciated for their
work under unbelievable conditions. & to think it all happened agin in WW2..
such a waste of young lives.
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By JRF TOP 1000 REVIEWER on 26 Oct. 2014
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Much has been written about World War I and the causes of that calamitious conflict, but little has been said about the aftermath. Max Arthur does a lot to correct matters in this very readable book, where he allows the voices of those who lived to see the armistice to be heard clearly after all these years. And in doing so, he performs a valuable service in highlighting the serious problems, and sometimes tragedies, that many faced.
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Format: Kindle Edition
This is another of Max Arthur's collection of short reminiscences from First World War veterans, taken from various sources, including from the Imperial War Museum's sound archives. As the title suggests, this focuses on what happened once the fighting had ended - the reactions to the Armistice, both on the Front and at home, demobilisation, the horrific effects of physical and mental injuries, readjustment to civilian life and work, and survivors' attitudes towards remembrance and commemoration in later years. Interviewees are varied - front line soldiers mostly, but also auxiliaries, conscientious objectors and family members.

What is perhaps most striking is how differently people reacted to their experiences: some were broken physically and/or mentally and scarred for life, while others say they emerged stronger as they could cope with anything in life after surviving what they had been through. Many came to hate all war, feeling it had been an utter waste, and became pacifists; others joined the regular forces or considered it had been all worthwhile. Nevertheless, some very common points seem to emerge:

the general reaction on the Front to the Armistice was quiet relief and numbness, rather than joy and exhilaration

demobilisation was frustratingly slow and the sudden absence of any sense of purpose led to a lot of problems, punctuated by the horrors of Spanish flu killing survivors and families like flies (one sergeant major learned that one of his daughters had died of the flu, returned home and while there, his wife and other five children all died; he came back to the Front and died also).
Read more ›
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
The testimonies in this book are very moving. The post-Great War period is under-explored by historians but very important. This book begins to fill the gap. The stories of post-war unemployment, disability and poverty are tragic.
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Really compelling stories well written. As a more modern veteran I fully appreciate what those men did for for us although I find it difficult to imagine the conditions they experienced.
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