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We Are All Made of Glue by [Lewycka, Marina]
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We Are All Made of Glue Kindle Edition

3.8 out of 5 stars 129 customer reviews

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Product Description

Review

'(On Two Caravans) Alone at the microphone, the stupendous Sian Thomas becomes an enormous international cast of every age, sex, and temperament.' - Sue Gaisford, Independent

Review

"Vibrant dialogue, a family meltdown, a clash of cultures and a wonderful cast of expertly observed characters. Pure laugh-out-loud social comedy." (The Daily Mail)

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 3436 KB
  • Print Length: 444 pages
  • Page Numbers Source ISBN: 1905490224
  • Publisher: Penguin (2 July 2009)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B002RI9S1A
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars 129 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #34,883 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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By Denise4891 TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 15 July 2009
Format: Hardcover
I loved this warm, funny story about two lonely women who form an unlikely but very touching friendship.

When she's not editing online articles about adhesives, Georgie is penning her hilariously bad romantic novel 'The Splattered Heart' and dreaming of lantern-jawed heroes. There are some very funny moments but, as with Marina Lewycka's previous book, Two Caravans, there's a serious side as well.

After being named as her next of kin when Mrs Shapiro goes into hospital, Georgie unravels her neighbour's history through a series of hidden letters and photographs, spanning the rise of Hitler and the Arab-Israeli conflict, with some pretty shocking discoveries along the way.

Mrs Shapiro is a wonderfully colourful creation and Marina Lewycka's brilliant ear for dialogue is very much in evidence. Unfortunately there's no 'Dog' this time, but there are plenty of cats to keep animal lovers happy (I loved 'Wonder Boy').

After being a bit underwhelmed by Tractors (I blame the hype) but loving Caravans, I wasn't sure what to expect this time, but on the evidence of her latest book Marina Lewycka gets better and better. The 'message' is perhaps a little cheesy - something to do with the 'glue' that holds us all together - but totally forgivable as the endearing characters and gentle humour made this a really entertaining and uplifting read.
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Format: Paperback
Marina Lewycka's book are like plain brown paper parcels that contain something wonderful titles about 'tractors' caravans' and 'glue' may not get your pulse racing but this is beautifully crafted, effortlessly funny stuff. I am not really fussed if I laughed a little bit less with this one than her previous books...laughs in fiction are few and far between so, I applaud anyone who genuinely put a big smile on my mush. I love the fact that while the touch is delicate - the issues can be heavyweight...painful conflicts, marital break-down, scandelous care of the elderly and a son obsessed with Armagedon.
I love the subtle homour....it's hard to give an example without blowing the plot but a suitably ditzy would-be novelist befriends an insane 'lady' of indeterminate age and origin and has to poke around her gruesomely smelly house - incontinent old ladies/many cats etc...the bathroom is suitably disgusting but, a fairy Godmother social worker dismisses the appalling state with a kindly "There's no accounting for cultural diversity"...a quote I'll memorise and use again I am sure.
great book...
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Format: Paperback
Isn't it odd, how different people see different books? For me this was the best of Lewycka's three books so far. I found "Tractors" readable but to be trying a bit too hard - "look at me, me I can write of funny families who have odd outlandish customs from foreign, yes?" (though I'm sure Marina Lewycka doesn't talk like that) and "Caravans" was far better, maybe because it was less claustrophobic, less limited to the odd antics of a single family. This, for me, is better again.

We're back to a "single family" cast here, or at least a family which is getting steadily weirder plus a very weird old lady who has a touching history (or does she?). The weird old lady maybe owes a little too much to Alan Bennett's Lady in the Van (Miss Shepherd, a real person whose story is told in The Lady In The Van) but is pretty much believable, as is her struggle with the Forces of Darkness in the form of Social Services - the internal power struggles within Social Services are especially funny. I'd recommend trying this one, even if you tried "Tractors", didn't like it, and didn't bother with "Caravans" on the strength of that.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I enjoyed Marina Lewycka's original two novels very much, and was looking forward to this. However, I felt there was too much going on on too many levels. Like some other readers, I found the glue metaphor heavy handed and extraneous; likewise the secondary writing layer of the narrator's attempts at romantic fiction was less funny and rather more intrusive than was probably intended. The main character - eccentric old Mrs Naomi Shapiro aka Ella Wechsler - dominated to the detriment of most of the other characters, who were sometimes little more than caricatures. The evil estate agents and evil social workers/care home nurses were a bit cardboard cut-out and I never had much of a feel for the deserting husband. The narrator was moderately sympathetic, and the cats were OK, if rather too much emphasis was placed on the cat poo front. There was quite a lot of earnest information about the Israel/Palestine impasse, although much of it was interesting, particularly the small excerpt about the Danish Jews. I felt that none of it quite blended - or glued - to make a properly satisfying and coherent read, although it was quite an enjoyable page turner.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This is a delightful novel about Georgie, editor of an adhesives trade magazine (which provides a rich extended metaphor about human bonding, and indeed bondage). Her husband has recently left her and her teenage son is obsessed with Armageddon. Then she meets Mrs Shapiro, an eccentric emigree who lives nearby in a big dishevelled mansion with a herd of cats. After a death-defying fish supper at Mrs Shapiro's (more salmonella than salmon), Georgie is surprised to find herself named as next of kin when Mrs Shapiro lands in hospital after a fall. Thus begins a battle between Georgie, looking out for the old lady, and various forces of darkness in the shape of estate agents, social services types and council officials, all of whom want to get their mitts on the property. A Palestinian handyman with his two juniors, the "Uselesses", enters the scene when the house needs repairs, and so, through his story and Mrs Shapiro's connections in Israel, the focus shifts obliquely to the Holy Land and its difficult history.
This book is both serious and hilarious and celebrates the triumph of the individual over greed and callous officialdom.
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