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The Watchdog That Didn't Bark: The Financial Crisis and the Disappearance of Investigative Journalism (Columbia Journalism Review Books) Hardcover – 20 Jun 2014

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Product details

  • Hardcover: 368 pages
  • Publisher: Columbia University Press (20 Jun. 2014)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0231158181
  • ISBN-13: 978-0231158183
  • Product Dimensions: 2.5 x 16.5 x 24.1 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars 1 customer review
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 303,859 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
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Review

"The Watchdog that Didn't Bark", given its in-depth analysis across the landscape, steeped in history, and Starkman's keen understanding of business of journalism, can stand as a potentially enduring case study of what went wrong and why.--Alec Klein, Northwestern University Journalism Professor, Director of The Medill Justice Project and award-winning investigative reporter formerly of The Washington Post

Dean Starkman is literally a reporter's reporter. As such he gets to the bottom of the story of how the US business press could miss the most important economic implosion of the past 80 years until it was too late. And he does so with prose that is intelligent, engaging and erudite. I recommend "The Watchdog" without reservation.--Eric Alterman, CUNY Distinguished Professor of English and Journalism, Brooklyn College, and media columnist, "The Nation"

Journalists didn't miss the subprime lending that spun into the devastating financial collapse of 2008. Excellent reporting was available, from the "Financial Times" to the "Los Angeles Times "to a small alternative publication, "Southern Exposur"e. But Dean Starkman shows that even reporters who were on top of things buried the lead: the story wasn't new financial instruments, risky investments, or high-pressured Wall Street. The story was corruption. There were old-fashioned, greedy villains. Old-fashioned moralizing was called for. It would have had the advantage of being both true and fascinating. So how did so many fine journalists miss the big story? Read Starkman's powerful and disturbing analysis of how business journalism came to write for an audience of investors, not citizens. You may not share his every judgment, but this account has the advantage of being both true and fascinating.--Michael Schudson, Columbia University

"The Watchdog That Didn't Bark", given its in-depth analysis across the landscape, steeped in history, and Starkman's keen understanding of the business of journalism, can stand as a potentially enduring case study of what went wrong and why.--Alec Klein, director of the Medill Justice Project and award-winning investigative reporter formerly with the "Washington Post"

Starkman is literally a reporter's reporter. As such, he gets to the bottom of the story of how the U.S. business press could miss the most important economic implosion of the past eighty years until it was too late, and he does so with prose that is intelligent, engaging, and erudite. I recommend The Watchdog without reservation.--Eric Alterman, Brooklyn College, and media columnist, "The Nation"

Here is the missing piece in the financial-crisis mystery: how did our vaunted business-journalism sector manage to miss the problem with mortgage-backed investments? The answer, as Dean Starkman shows us in this amazing autopsy, is that the business outweighs the journalism and that it is getting worse, not better, as we go forward.--Thomas Frank, author of "Pity the Billionaire: The Hard-Times Swindle and the Unlikely Comeback of the Right"

Journalism was complicit in the predation and corruption that brought down world financial markets and wrecked the lives of millions. Obsessed with shallow scoops, giddy from the laughing gas of access, financial journalists abjectly failed to connect dots, and left abusive, reckless, and criminal corporations free to drag the global economy into the abyss. Dean Starkman is the author we have been waiting for to tell this story. He not only puts forward a keen, subtle, and fair account of the journalistic default, he names names.--Todd Gitlin, author of "Media Unlimited: How the Torrent of Images and Sounds Overwhelms Our Lives"

With American journalism at sea, here comes a navigator who really knows its mission, the riptides it is facing, and the ports it must reach. Starkman tells it all with the heart, clarity, and dry wit that redeem business journalism even while showing how it lost its anchor and compass.--Jim Sleeper, former editor and columnist at "Newsday" and the "New York Daily News"

Journalists did not miss the subprime lending that spun into the devastating financial collapse of 2008. Excellent reporting was available, from the "Financial Times" to the "Los Angeles Times "to a small alternative publication, "Southern Exposur"e. Yet Dean Starkman shows that even reporters who were on top of things buried the lead: the story was not new financial instruments, risky investments, or high-pressured Wall Street. The story was corruption. There were old-fashioned, greedy villains. Old-fashioned moralizing was called for. It would have had the advantage of being both true and fascinating. So how did so many fine journalists miss the big story? Read Starkman's powerful and disturbing analysis of how business journalism came to write for an audience of investors, not citizens. You may not share his every judgment, but this account has the advantage of being both true and fascinating.--Michael Schudson, Columbia Journalism School, author of "The Power of News"

"The Watchdog That Didn't Bark," given its in-depth analysis across the landscape, steeped in history, and Starkman's keen understanding of the business of journalism, can stand as a potentially enduring case study of what went wrong and why.--Alec Klein, director of the Medill Justice Project and award-winning investigative reporter formerly with the "Washington Post"

"The Watchdog That Didn't Bark," given its in-depth analysis across the landscape, steeped in history, and Starkman's keen understanding of the business of journalism, can stand as a potentially enduring case study of what went wrong and why.--Alec Klein, director of the Medill Justice Project and award-winning investigative reporter formerly with the "Washington Post"

The Watchdog That Didn't Bark, given its in-depth analysis across the landscape, steeped in history, and Starkman's keen understanding of the business of journalism, can stand as a potentially enduring case study of what went wrong and why.

--Alec Klein, director of the Medill Justice Project and award-winning investigative reporter formerly with the Washington Post

Starkman is literally a reporter's reporter. As such, he gets to the bottom of the story of how the U.S. business press could miss the most important economic implosion of the past eighty years until it was too late, and he does so with prose that is intelligent, engaging, and erudite. I recommend The Watchdog without reservation.

--Eric Alterman, Brooklyn College, and media columnist, The Nation

Here is the missing piece in the financial-crisis mystery: how did our vaunted business-journalism sector manage to miss the problem with mortgage-backed investments? The answer, as Dean Starkman shows us in this amazing autopsy, is that the business outweighs the journalism and that it is getting worse, not better, as we go forward.

--Thomas Frank, author of Pity the Billionaire: The Hard-Times Swindle and the Unlikely Comeback of the Right

Journalism was complicit in the predation and corruption that brought down world financial markets and wrecked the lives of millions. Obsessed with shallow scoops, giddy from the laughing gas of access, financial journalists abjectly failed to connect dots, and left abusive, reckless, and criminal corporations free to drag the global economy into the abyss. Dean Starkman is the author we have been waiting for to tell this story. He not only puts forward a keen, subtle, and fair account of the journalistic default, he names names.

--Todd Gitlin, author of Media Unlimited: How the Torrent of Images and Sounds Overwhelms Our Lives

With American journalism at sea, here comes a navigator who really knows its mission, the riptides it is facing, and the ports it must reach. Starkman tells it all with the heart, clarity, and dry wit that redeem business journalism even while showing how it lost its anchor and compass.

--Jim Sleeper, former editor and columnist at Newsday and the New York Daily News

Journalists did not miss the subprime lending that spun into the devastating financial collapse of 2008. Excellent reporting was available, from the Financial Times to the Los Angeles Times to a small alternative publication, Southern Exposure. Yet Dean Starkman shows that even reporters who were on top of things buried the lead: the story was not new financial instruments, risky investments, or high-pressured Wall Street. The story was corruption. There were old-fashioned, greedy villains. Old-fashioned moralizing was called for. It would have had the advantage of being both true and fascinating. So how did so many fine journalists miss the big story? Read Starkman's powerful and disturbing analysis of how business journalism came to write for an audience of investors, not citizens. You may not share his every judgment, but this account has the advantage of being both true and fascinating.

--Michael Schudson, Columbia Journalism School, author of The Power of News

The Watchdog That Didn't Bark, given its in-depth analysis across the landscape, steeped in history, and Starkman's keen understanding of the business of journalism, can stand as a potentially enduring case study of what went wrong and why.--Alec Klein, director of the Medill Justice Project and award-winning investigative reporter formerly with the Washington Post

Starkman is literally a reporter's reporter. As such, he gets to the bottom of the story of how the U.S. business press could miss the most important economic implosion of the past eighty years until it was too late, and he does so with prose that is intelligent, engaging, and erudite. I recommend The Watchdog without reservation.--Eric Alterman, Brooklyn College, and media columnist, The Nation

Here is the missing piece in the financial-crisis mystery: how did our vaunted business-journalism sector manage to miss the problem with mortgage-backed investments? The answer, as Dean Starkman shows us in this amazing autopsy, is that the business outweighs the journalism and that it is getting worse, not better, as we go forward.--Thomas Frank, author of Pity the Billionaire: The Hard-Times Swindle and the Unlikely Comeback of the Right

Journalism was complicit in the predation and corruption that brought down world financial markets and wrecked the lives of millions. Obsessed with shallow scoops, giddy from the laughing gas of access, financial journalists abjectly failed to connect dots, and left abusive, reckless, and criminal corporations free to drag the global economy into the abyss. Dean Starkman is the author we have been waiting for to tell this story. He not only puts forward a keen, subtle, and fair account of the journalistic default, he names names.--Todd Gitlin, author of Media Unlimited: How the Torrent of Images and Sounds Overwhelms Our Lives

With American journalism at sea, here comes a navigator who really knows its mission, the riptides it is facing, and the ports it must reach. Starkman tells it all with the heart, clarity, and dry wit that redeem business journalism even while showing how it lost its anchor and compass.--Jim Sleeper, former editor and columnist at Newsday and the New York Daily News

Journalists did not miss the subprime lending that spun into the devastating financial collapse of 2008. Excellent reporting was available, from the Financial Times to the Los Angeles Times to a small alternative publication, Southern Exposure. Yet Dean Starkman shows that even reporters who were on top of things buried the lead: the story was not new financial instruments, risky investments, or high-pressured Wall Street. The story was corruption. There were old-fashioned, greedy villains. Old-fashioned moralizing was called for. It would have had the advantage of being both true and fascinating. So how did so many fine journalists miss the big story? Read Starkman's powerful and disturbing analysis of how business journalism came to write for an audience of investors, not citizens. You may not share his every judgment, but this account has the advantage of being both true and fascinating.--Michael Schudson, Columbia Journalism School, author of The Power of News

About the Author

Dean Starkman is based in New York and covers Wall Street as a staff writer for the Los Angeles Times. A reporter for two decades, he worked for eight years as a Wall Street Journal staff writer and was chief of the Providence Journal's investigative unit. He has won numerous national and regional journalism awards and helped lead the Providence Journal to the 1994 Pulitzer Prize for Investigations.


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Amazon.com: 4.1 out of 5 stars 11 reviews
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5.0 out of 5 starsHighly readable, points made apply to every aspect of news not just business
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5.0 out of 5 starsGreat Insight Into the Press Coverage of Wall Street
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