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The Warrior-Prophet: Book 2 of the Prince of Nothing Paperback – 19 Jan 2006

4.2 out of 5 stars 20 customer reviews

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  • The Warrior-Prophet: Book 2 of the Prince of Nothing
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  • The Thousandfold Thought: Book 3 of the Prince of Nothing
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  • The Darkness That Comes Before: Book 1 of the Prince of Nothing
Total price: £31.97
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Product details

  • Paperback: 768 pages
  • Publisher: Orbit; New Ed edition (19 Jan. 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1841494100
  • ISBN-13: 978-1841494104
  • Product Dimensions: 10.8 x 3.9 x 17.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (20 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 53,378 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

Compelling. . . Keeps the pages turning. The final cinematic scene, of a vast landscape filled with enormous armies, nicely sets the stage for book three of this daringly unconventional series in the Tolkien mold. (PUBLISHERS WEEKLY)

Leaves most of the competition trailing (GUARDIAN)

Book Description

The second book in R. Scott Bakker's acclaimed fantasy masterpiece, The Prince of Nothing

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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
This is an interesting series with great potential, rewarding in many ways, frustrating in others, and it deserves a review. What is written below covers both novels in the series published to date.
First, the good points. Bakker has created a genuinely interesting world. There is a good sense of his novel taking place across a great gulf of time, and he puts many of his set pieces in environments that stem from his world's antiquity. His writing often flows well, and many scenes are genuine page turners. In the Consult, he has fashioned something original, particularly its skin spies, and the scenes with them are excellent, sometimes spine-tingling, in particular the ravishing of Esmenet and the unmasking of Skeaos in Book 1. His politics are ambitious and have something of the complexity of the real world, although he seems to prefer attempting to psychoanalyse his characters and their actions and choices rather than deal with the really hard work and questions thrown up by the grand political vistas he lays out. His use of dreams to allow the propagation and preservation of knowledge across centuries is also interesting, although woefully under-exploited, as are the intriguing Cishaurim sorcerors. In Achamian and Esmenet he has fashioned two well thought out, usually sympathetic and engaging characters, and in the Scylvendi chieftain Cnaiur a genuinely nasty chap caught between two worlds and loyalties and for whom we end up rooting.
Now for the critical points. This is a world supposedly under threat from an old menace, the No-God, which brought about an Apocaplypse in earlier times.
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Format: Paperback
I read an interview with R Scott Bakker on Sffworld and there is one thing he said that sticks in my mind. "Here I was, this egghead with a small deal in a small market, casting about looking for ways to reach those I thought would love the book: world-junkies (such as myself), and those who'd abandoned epic fantasy when they went to university."
I loved epic fantasy in my youth and for years I read fantasy almost exclusively. As I got older I realized I was missing out and migrated and expanded my reading interests and also started to feel that the majority of fantasy output was clichéd, unimaginative copies of Tolkien, and largely childish drivel (David Eddings and Terry Brooks spring to mind).
I started to feel embarrassed that I ever found this stuff so enthralling, and try as I might to find good adult, intelligent fantasy, I found the task impossible. For a long time I left the genre to the spotty adolescents, battling with their hormones and trying to find the meaning of life in the words of Gandalf.
It was the work of George RR Martin that showed me that there were authors out there writing intelligent and entertaining fantasy that could still appeal to people over twenty. So to me the work of R Scott Bakker is very special. Intelligent fantasy writing with philosophical undertones, it does come across as a modern Lord of the Rings. I wouldn't burden Bakker with the platitude of `best fantasy author since Tolkien'. However, I would say that hell of a lot of thought has gone into the Prince of Nothing series and Bakker's characters are deep and a pleasure to read.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
R. Scott Bakker has written a great sequel to 'The Darkness That Comes Before'. It is not easy reading by any means but there is so much here that is intelligent, thought-provoking and dark. This is how epic fantasy should be ..... dark, intense, deep with elements of horror. This is no children's book at all. There is no such pretence of good or evil and every character is flawed.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
With the second installment of The Prince of Nothing trilogy, things really start to move forward. The first book was all about establishing the Holy War and now we get to see what the Holy War entails. Bakker writes some of the most detailed and engrossing large scale battles in fantasy and the war in general is depicted with such brutal honesty that it is clear there are no "good guys" present. Amidst this backdrop of carnage we finally get to see just how powerful and dangerous Kellhus is as he increases his influence over the those involved in the Holy War. While characters such as Achamian, Cnaiur and Esmenet are still present this is very much Kellhus' book, so those who felt he was underused previously will be delighted. While the focus on Kellhus is entertaining it does mean that a lot of the prominent characters from the first book fade into the background, most notably Conphas and Xerius, who I felt had entertaining viewpoints. The other problem is that while it exemplifies Kellhus' power there are several characters who I feel are weakened by their readiness to succumb to his will and some parts had me feeling angry at both Kellhus and his victims. Then again it is this uncompromising and dark approach that makes me appreciate Bakker as the best of the current bunch of "mature" fantasy authors and with this book he demonstrates that he can deliver on a consistent basis. For anyone who liked, "The Darkness that comes before" but felt not enough happened, I would strongly suggest giving the series another chance as this is where the pay off to all the set up begins.
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