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The Wanderer: Le Grand Meaulnes (German) Hardcover – Illustrated, 1947

5.0 out of 5 stars 1 customer review

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Hardcover, Illustrated, 1947
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Product details

  • Hardcover: 224 pages
  • Publisher: Paul Elek; 1st edition (1947)
  • Language: German
  • ASIN: B0014PMQJ8
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 3,347,200 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

DIFFERENT OFFER (this item listed here is DIFFERENT from the title and/or picture above. Please see description & pictures by BookGems before placing an order): Edition Folio Society, a Book Club edition, 1979. English translation titled THE LAND OF LOST CONTENT by Katharine Vivian, with an Introduction by Patrick Garland, and Lithographs by Ian Ribbons. Hardback volume in slipcase. Remains in very good condition throughout: Green cloth hard cover with full decoration and gilt lettering on spine; text all clean, neat and tight. Slipcase remains intact. Prompt dispatch from UK.

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By still searching TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 17 Mar. 2014
At the start of Daphne du Maurier’s Rebecca the narrator reminds us that ‘we can never go back again’ as, in her dream, she wanders the winding, overgrown path to Manderley. Likewise, George Webber, Thomas Wolfe’s ‘hero’ reluctantly concludes, that ‘you can’t go home again’ at the end of his novel of the same name. And this, in essence, is the theme that haunts this elegiac tale of childhood lost and with it the innocence that often, in adulthood, we wish was ours still to claim.

The story of Augustin Meaulnes or, Le Grand Meaulnes, as he is entitled by its narrator, Francois Seurel, 15 years old at the story’s opening, begins when 17 year old Augustin becomes a pupil in the school run by Francois’ father. Its setting is the small village of Saint-Agathe in the Department of Cher about as close to the centre of France as you can get, in the years leading up to the Great War. The two boys quickly become friends and the older boy soon becomes the kind of hero-like figure that features, commonly, in the developing life of a post-pubescent teen-aged boy. Augustin has a charm and a certain otherwordliness absent in the other pupils with whom Francois is familiar and he is keen to enter into the adventures that friendship with Le Grand Meaulnes suggest might be forthcoming.

Instead, taking off in the dead of night, Augustin embarks on his own escapade; one that will determine the direction in which his life, and those close to him, from then on, will travel. On his return he appears distracted and preoccupied and, eventually, relates his adventure to Francois.

This is a wonderfully written, haunting, tale that will, in all likelihood, remain with the reader long after the last word is read, which accurately recalls all of the sweet pain of youth, during which dreams and life become one and the world seems replete with possibility.
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