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Walter & The Resurrection Of G Paperback – 7 Dec 1995

4.1 out of 5 stars 11 customer reviews

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Paperback, 7 Dec 1995
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Product details

  • Paperback: 503 pages
  • Publisher: Headline Review; New edition edition (7 Dec. 1995)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0747249946
  • ISBN-13: 978-0747249948
  • Product Dimensions: 13 x 19.8 x 3 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 2,262,910 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

An intriguing adventure of the hermetic imagination across time, T.J. Armstrong s first novel compels attention throughout its twinned story-lines and leaves a strange afterglow in the mind Lindsay Clarke, author of the CHYMICAL WEDDING, winner of the Whitbread Award for Fiction. --Lindsay Clarke, author of the CHYMICAL WEDDING, winner of the Whitbread Award for Fiction. --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

About the Author

T. J. Armstrong was born in Essex in 1957. He read Modern Languages at Oxford and studied Philosophy at London University. He teaches Modern Languages at the King's School, Canterbury.

Customer Reviews

4.1 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
This book will blow you away if you're interested in Tarot, mediaeval theology or music, in the crusades, or if you're just looking for a ripping good story. I was gripped from beginning to end, and the last section of the book both explains (to an extent) and complicates the whole plot of what has preceded. This is a book of ideas as well as of narrative, and I won't pretend that it is exactly of the holiday reading variety; but the language is rich, the author obviously has knowledge behind and underneath the darkly sparkling imagination, and the world created (though European, so different from our own) is one in which you'll truly be able to immerse yourself.
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Format: Paperback
Tim Armstrong has given us a first novel of exceptional power. Walter and the Resurrection of G is a book which haunts and teases the mind, and which grows on re-reading. So intricately crafted is it, that you can easily miss much of its subtlety and cleverness - particularly the superbly worked-out correspondences between the mediaeval and modern worlds and the ways in which occult symbols summarise events. And that would be a great pity, for it is in the patterning of Walter that it’s meaning lies: the structure is the answer.

The thing I enjoyed most in the novel was this exploration of the ways in which people struggle to make sense of their lives by seeking patterns. As one character says, 'There is no answer. Only the patterns you perceive. 'So what kind of novel is this? Certainly a thriller, for there is some terrific suspense as Walter gets in and out of dreadful scrapes. There is the sustained suspense of his struggles to find out why people keep telling him 'You are the One' when it is not at all clear what 'the One' is. And you keep reading to find out the identity and purpose of the mysterious Brotherhood of Watchers who surface repeatedly to shape Walter's life. There are brilliantly tense episodes: I particularly enjoyed Walter's outwitting the mighty Johannes of Ulm in the tournament and the dramatic revelations and fiery destruction in the church of San Saturio. But best of all is G's gripping apparent return from the dead to interrupt a moment of passion, followed by his disappearance into a cellar full of occult symbolism, computers and voyeuristic video screens. I much enjoyed the incisive writing of this modern section.
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Format: Paperback
This is an extremely authentic historical novel about a singer who sets off on a series of adventures in 12th century Germany. The writing is very powerful and shows an exceptional command of imagery and a real understanding of what it must have been like to live in those times. The names can only have been created by someone with a thorough knowledge of history, and the dark powers that pursue Walter, the hero, are vivid without being too crudely done. The second part of the book is set in modern England, where we learn of a modern conclusion to the story based on the findings of a scholar of medieval literature. The author has certainly done his homework. Alchemy and necromancy, witchcraft and torture, it’s all there. This book is a really absorbing read. Would highly recommend!
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By Ludovico Sforza TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 29 Oct. 2015
Format: Paperback Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
If you want to pass some hours and you are into, let’s call it, historical fantasy, then this is an excellent book. The hero travels about a lot and covers most of the the medieval world as well as our own. He, Walter, also encounters lots of problems, al la Blondel, any one of which would be sufficient for me for one lifetime………The main problem for me is that try as I might I could not warm to the character of Walter and by the end I could not have cared less what happened to him! That’s down to me though and I am sure most folk will throughly enjoy the book.
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Format: Paperback
A book of two parts,we are told the story of Walter, a cartwright's son who becomes a wandering singer. His station in life rises and falls, he has loves and lovers, is forever trying to find his true purpose and is unknowingly guided and manipulated by a mysterious secret society. He joins the Templar knights and becomes intent upon relieving Jerusalem. We are there through his triumphs, failures, doubts until he finally finds the contentment he craves.

The second part of the book finds his writings, songs and poems in the hands of a modern day Oxford professor, known only as 'G'. But the irascible G dies in Spain and his legacy passes to one of his students – Ian – and the mysterious Lilian. It is for them to sort through his papers and get them published if they can.

Overall, this is a good read and one can't help getting caught up with Walter and his ambitions. But, sadly, it is not perfect: I found three occasions of passages being underlined for no apparent reason (perhaps some pieces singled out for editing and not removed for the printing?). One or two minor typos should be noted but are acceptable. The chapters are all headed by the name of a Tarot Card from the Major Arcane but unfortunately, two consecutive chapters use the same heading. I don't think this was deliberate. The second (designated as Appendix I and much shorter) part of the book uses this same method, as do the poems that are printed as Appendix II.

On its own, the story of Walter would certainly stand up as a very good historical novel for it is well written, with good style and description: the aftermath in the modern day I found confusing and frustrating in that it seems to leave a lot of questions unanswered – and most of those questions would begin with 'Why....?'

Nevertheless, I did enjoy and maybe another reader may understand better than I what the writer is getting at.

(Reviewed for the Historical Novel Society)
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