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Walk Don't Run [DVD]

3.8 out of 5 stars 12 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Actors: Cary Grant, Samantha Eggar, Jim Hutton, John Standing, Miko Taka
  • Directors: Charles Walters
  • Producers: Sol C. Siegel
  • Format: PAL
  • Language: English
  • Subtitles: Arabic, Dutch, English, French, German, Greek, Hindi, Hungarian, Italian, Portuguese, Romanian, Spanish, Turkish
  • Dubbed: French, German, Italian, Spanish
  • Region: Region 2 (This DVD may not be viewable outside Europe. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 16:9 - 2.35:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Classification: U
  • Studio: UCA
  • DVD Release Date: 3 Oct. 2005
  • Run Time: 114 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (12 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B000B7VZEM
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 70,755 in DVD & Blu-ray (See Top 100 in DVD & Blu-ray)

Product Description

Product Description

Comedy starring Cary Grant. When English industrialist Sir William Rutland (Grant) arrives in Tokyo on business, the influx of tourists for the upcoming Olympic games makes it impossible to find lodging. So Rutland fast-talks his way into sharing an apartment with beautiful Christine Easton (Samantha Eggar) for a few days. To further confuse matters, Rutland invites Steve Davis (Jim Hutton), a member of the U.S. Olympic team, to share his apartment. Three soon becomes a crowd as Rutland plays Cupid between Christine and Steve, much to Christine's dull fiancé's surprise.

Customer Reviews

3.8 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: DVD
Cary Grant is known to romance the leading ladies in most of his movies with few exceptions, and this is one of them. This may be appropriate since he was 62 when this movie was made. The twist in the movie is that he sees a younger version of himself in a young American Olympian named Steve Davis (Jim Hutton) whom he meets during the 1964 Olympic Games.

Cary Grant plays William Rutland a charming businessman; during one of his business trips to Tokyo, he persuades a young woman named Christine Easton (Samantha Eggar) to sublet her apartment, when he could not find a place to stay in the city. The two become unwilling roomies because of the gender difference. While the Christine is not too thrilled with the arrangement she tries to adjust with the new situation, but it gets a little more complicated when Rutland sublets his apartment to Steve Davis. Rutland plays cupid on two young roommates in spite of their incompatible personalities, and Christine's engagement to a boring diplomat named Julius Haversack (John Standing). Rutland meddles in the young couple's romantic problems, and goes an extra distance to pretend as a competitor of 20 kilometer walk to talk to Jim during his event, and tries to heal the differences between the young lovers. The best moments of the film are Rutland's walk in his boxer shorts and a T-shirt avoiding the police and the game regulators; and sharing the cramp apartment with the two young people. Rutland makes references to his two earlier movies; Charade and An Affair to Remember by singing the theme songs.
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By bernie TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 19 Sept. 2005
Format: DVD
Sir William Rutland (Cary Grant) British industrialist is in town two days early. This is during the 1964 Tokyo Olympics and there is no where to stay. He finds an apartment to sublet from Christine Easton (Samantha Eggar) who posted it not even dreaming that a male would answer her ad. Later Steve Davis (Jim Hutton) an Olympic competitor is also early and sublets from Sir Rutland's sublet. On top of this Christine's fiancée works at the British embassy and must maintain a proper background. Now you see the makings of a good comedy.
I learned to make coffee from this movie (a unique proportion of grounds to water) and there are many parallel mysteries as just what sport does Steve Davis compete in?
Being Grants last movie surly did not slow him down and he has those Grant expressions down pat
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This was Cary Grant's last film and is a fitting role for him, charming, good-humoured with a nice dose of physical comedy thrown in. He does what all the screen greats do: leaves you thinking that he was the only man who could possibly have played this role. Although, in this case, he probably was.

Walk Don't Run is one of those films that seemed to be churned out in the 1960s, a nice tight plot, a fine group of characters and some good laughs along the way all brought together with a good cast.

Grant plays businessman Sir William Rutland who turns up earlier than planned in Tokyo which is hosting the Olympic Games and, of course, there isn't a hotel room to be had. He ends up charming his way into the flat of a single girl until he can get into his hotel room. That however, isn't the signal for the usual plot, as Grant ends up playing cupid in a brilliantly unsentimental manner for the girl and an Olympic athlete he picks up along the way.

There are some very funny moments, not least when Grant ends up in an Olympic event, and all this is done with the debonair style that he displayed in Charade and as far back as Monkey Business.

Mention Cary Grant and this film would probably never enter most people's minds (probably because they will never have heard if it) and that's a real shame. Walk Don't Run is a fitting testament to a fine British actor who charmed the world. I would be amazed if anyone could find anything to dislike about this little gem of a film.
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Format: DVD
1943's The More the Merrier was so typical of the kind of film that Cary Grant was making in the 40s that it seems surprising the juvenile romantic lead went to Joel McCrea, but Grant made up for it with his last film, Walk Don't Run, a 1966 remake relocated from the wartime housing shortage in Washington D.C. to an overbooked Tokyo in the run up to the Olympics. Not that he's still playing the romantic lead - the film plays on Grant's own awareness that his looks were fading and his days of romancing younger co-stars were over - taking instead the Charles Coburn role as Samantha Eggar's unwelcome tenant who acts as matchmaker for her and Jim Hutton's initially unlikeable member of the Olympic team who is similarly homeless until he gatecrashes her apartment. Thankfully the part has been retailored for Grant's charms as he hums the theme tune from Charade while making his coffee or sings An Affair to Remember while preparing breakfast, acknowledging the passing of the years by the way he gets offended when absolutely no-one assumes he's up to hanky panky with his landlady. It's a glossy widescreen production that's definitely a little too leisurely at nearly two hours and could easily have benefited from being a good two reels shorter to tighten things up a bit, but it's a pleasant enough swansong for its star even if it doesn't give him quite as much to work with as it could.

Columbia's DVD has a fine 2.35:1 transfer with trailers for Sense and Sensibility and Cat Ballou the only extras.
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