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Waiting For The Sun

4.5 out of 5 stars 51 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Audio CD (1 Oct. 1991)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: Elektra
  • ASIN: B000002I2B
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  Audio Cassette  |  Vinyl  |  MP3 Download
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (51 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 21,201 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)
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Product Description

Product Description

CD Waiting For The Sun Elektra, 7559-74024-2, 1968, 11 Track

Amazon.co.uk

This was the album which was due to feature "Celebration Of The Lizard"--Jim Morrison's eagerly-awaited 10-minute poem written in tribute to said sexy reptile. Alas though, it wasn't to be. Instead they inserted less ambitious oldie "Hello I Love You" at the last minute and hoped that no-one would mind. Unsurprisingly, it sticks out like a sore thumb on a set which represents the peak of Jim Morrison's belief that he was some kind of leather-trousered shaman. Were this not a 60s rock group, such acts of narcotic delusion might signal disaster. Narcotic delusion though, was what 60s rock groups did best--and here's an album full of it: the elegiac piano inflections that frame "Yes The River Knows"; the warped, disembodied "Not To Touch The Earth" and that oft-overlooked pagan sea-shanty "My Wild Love". Indeed, only "The Unknown Soldier" and "Five To One" serve to remind the listener that this was an album recorded at the peak of the Vietnam war--the latter lyric, of course, spawning the title of Morrison's best-selling biography No-One Here Gets Out Alive. --Peter Paphides

Customer Reviews

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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Audio CD
Los Angeles' finest The Doors released their third album, "Waiting for The Sun", on the back of breaking the UK market with a new catchy song, only to find themselves caught between being far too underground for mass consumption and being overly commercial for their hardcore fans.

"Waiting for The Sun" was released in the summer of 1968 on Elektra Records, it saw The Doors release material of a much more laid back nature then their previous two efforts, with mixed results on the buying public. Much has been made of the inclusion of their big UK smash "Hello I Love You", a song previously recorded on a 1965 demo tape, here it is the opening track on this album three years later, aside from the criticism surrounding its inclusion, on its own it remains an excellent song.

Track two on the album is much more in line with the general mood of the album, "Love Street" is classic Doors meets ballad, giving Morrison free range to be as beautiful as ever creating laid back gold. This happens throughout the album, "Summer's Almost Gone", "Wintertime Love" and "Yes The River Knows" are songs which I can only describe as lovely, with Robby Krieger on guitar and Ray Manzarek on keys creating the backdrop needed for their charismatic frontman.

It should also be said that there are some classic oddball Doors' tunes to be had on this album too, noticeably with Track 3 "Not To Touch The Earth" and the antiwar song "The Unknown Soldier", both of which are a fine listen. Incidentally track 3 was to play a bigger part in the album then it actually did. This song is actually just a section of a much larger song, "Celebration of The Lizard", which featured on a later live album.

The criticisms of this album are not unknown to other bands from throughout history.
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Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
The Doors' third album when released in 1968 contained no extended musical piece like `The End' or `When the Music's Over', and revealed a softer side. Mixed in with the more up-tempo pop songs `Hello I Love You' and `Love Street' are poignant ballads like `Summer's Almost Gone', `Yes, the River Knows', and the powerful `Wintertime Love'. Robbie Krieger proves he can play Classical guitar on `Spanish Caravan' and there is a streak of impassioned social-political protest with `The Unknown Soldier,' which unfortunately has not aged well.

On the 2007 40th Anniversary re-mix, Morrison's unfinished `Celebration of the Lizard' is offered as a rambling 17-minute extra, along with three previously unheard takes of the only part of his original epic deemed worthy of inclusion on the album, `Not to Touch the Earth'. Manzarek, Krieger and Densmore also demonstrate their versatility by performing an out-and-out Baroque classical piece, namely Albinoni's Adagio in G Minor.

Overall `Waiting for the Sun' is something a bit different from this versatile and unpredictable band, a mid-point in their five highly creative years before Morrison's untimely demise on 3rd July 1971. It's full of good stuff: if you've never heard it, check it out.
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Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Waiting for the Sun was the fourth studio album recorded by The Doors and a welcome return to form after the disappointing and very poppy "Soft Parade".
'Hello I love you' with that great keyboard intro "Love Street" a beautiful little song about where he's girlfriend Pamela Coulsen lived.
"Not to touch the Earth" and "Unknown Soldier" also make up a album that spawned a few songs for a greatest hits.

Not one of the most talked about Doors albums but definitely worth a punt there is plenty of good stuff to be found on here.
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Format: Audio CD
What do the marketing folks think we are? A load of memory deprived morons? All the Doors cds were reissued not that long ago as the definitive, from the master tape, approved by the Doors, super fi wonderbar issues. Ooops wait, lets put some studio chat on, some alternate ( read not so good ) takes, hey while we are at it lets include takes 1 to...... loads, a few discarded tracks and Lo and behold we sucker a load of folks to rebuy all their Doors cds. Fight it my friends, don't let the marketing guys separate you from your cash. Buy the album with the original tracks and revel in the Doors. This modern trend of adding rejects and studio banter is just a way of making fans pay for little extra and at the same time belittling the original concept of the album as a whole piece of complete art. Did Picasso include his sketches and errors as a bonus to his paintings? Do you Include your mistakes as part of your lifes work?
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Format: Audio CD
The Doors back catalogue has been due a makeover for years, and wow, haven't they spent some effort on it. The sound quality on these discs has never been bettered in my opinion. If you're thinking of upgrading your entire Doors collection, consider the Perception Box Set, if not read on...

This album contains some great songs (Five to One, Unknown Soldier), but it's not up to the exemplary standard of the first two albums. Songs like My Wild Love; Yes, the River Knows; We Could Be So Good Together and Love Street are OK songs, but they're musically and lyrically `light'. They're not the dense, poetic, dark, sinister, songs that crowd the first two Doors albums, and pale when compared against them.

However, the bonus cuts here are particularly interesting. Celebration of the Lizard is the highlight here. This was the song, or piece, that was intended to fill a whole side of the album, but the band were never happy with the result. The studio cut here is not at all bad, though whether it's closer to the Doors' goal than the recording on Absolutely Live or Live in New York is a moot point. Not to Touch the Earth was an outtake from Celebration that made it onto the album as a song in its own right. Albinoni's Adagio In G Minor was always an odd one for the Door's canon methinks...
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