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Waiting For The Sirens' Call CD

4.3 out of 5 stars 55 customer reviews

Price: £10.65 & FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £20. Details
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Product details

  • Audio CD (28 Mar. 2005)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: CD
  • Label: London Records 90 Ltd.
  • ASIN: B0007TF0T0
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  Vinyl  |  MP3 Download
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (55 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 22,278 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)
  • Sample this album Artist (Sample)
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Product Description

Product Description

NEW ORDER Waiting For The Sirens Call (2005 UK 11-track CD album from the legendary Manchester combo including the single Krafty)

Amazon.co.uk

New Order--the band that rose from the ashes of Joy Division after vocalist Ian Curtis took his own life--emerged from the post-punk permafrost of the early Eighties to straddle the pop world like a Dionysian disco Pink Floyd on MDMA. Waiting for the Sirens' Call--the band's eighth studio album and the Manchester combos' second outing since 1998's resumption of duties--is hardly likely to ensnare the post-millennial zeitgeist. But that's ageism for you. Leaving the legends of yore aside, a dispassionate analysis of Waiting for the Sirens' Call reveals two incontrovertibly classic new songs; "Turn" is a subdued but brooding successor to "Regret" while the title track--the sort of song that could soundtrack an entire summer--ploughs a lineal furrow right back through "Run", "All Day Long", "Love Vigilantes", "Leave Me Alone" and Joy Division's "Insight". Elsewhere there's a swathe of comfortably solid electro-indie rock cut from the same chiffon as "Brotherhood" or "Republic" and three quarrelsomely anomalous bones of un-New Orderly contention. The latter trinity--the brainlessly curt but catchy Stooges/Strokes stomp of "Working Overtime", the balmy indolent ragga of "I Told You So" and the effete "Jetstream Lover" (featuring Scissor Sister Ana Matronic) may precipitate fretful responses from the cognoscenti but at least these manoeuvres counter suspicions that New Order are treading water in a sea of circumspection. Yes, one senses that the guitar numbers flowed instinctively while the clubbier dance songs endured a more toilsome genesis (perhaps the songwriting balance has altered with guitarist Phil Cunningham having moved in to replace Gillian Gilbert) and yes, some numbers ("Guilt Is A Useless Emotion", "Dracula's Castle") are excellent but self-referential. Regardless, Waiting for the Sirens' Call is an engaging, quality record. --Kevin Maidment

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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By A Customer on 1 April 2005
Format: Audio CD
Firstly I am a big NO fan - from about 1987 and hearing "Substance" then buying their back catalogue of albums and every album since.
Having heard this album several times now and just read all the online reviews here on Amazon, I have reached the conclusion that there is a very definite split between hardcore NO fans.
Tracks evoke different emotions and some are loved or hated seemingly equally. Perhaps that is the genius of NO - they have a huge following yet nobody can quite put their finger on and agree on where that genius lies.
For my part I think the tracks here owe more to Electronic, Johnny Marr, and Bernard Sumner and the NO of "Get Ready" than they do to the New Order behind Technique, Blue Monday, True Faith, and Republic. There are undertones of "Republic" but anyone who says there is a strong vein of pop songs like "Technique" must be listening to a completely different album.
One thing bothering me at the moment is the track listing - Who's Joe and Hey Now What You Doing have lyrically identical first lines! Didn't someone point this out to the boys before they decided to put them together on the album?!
Personally I like "I told you so", "Morning Night & Day" and "Jetstream" - dislikes are "Dracula's Castle" which I find really doesn't fit in with the other tracks here and "Working Overtime" which is just kind of blah really.
Doubtless some will agree with me, but like I said, many other NO fans will totally disagree. I think it is testimony to NO's diversity that this is so, and proves that no matter your taste in music there is always room for NO in your music collection.
Things that never change are Bernard Sumners voice (which lets be honest, may be unique, but is ultimately rubbish) and Hooky's unmistakable bass sound.
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Format: Audio CD
New Order are an amazing and dynamic band who eschew typical genre conventions. They do dance, they do rock, and they do them both fantastically well... most of the time. They are also inconsistent (listen no further than to Brotherhood, easily their worst album, despite that fact that it contains one of their best-ever singles, Bizarre Love Triangle) which as a fan is both frustrating and endearing: you wish they'd taken a little more time to get it perfect because you know they are absolutely capable of doing so, but at the same time the odd tossed-off lyric or unfinished arrangement add a bit of humanity and warmth to their relatively enigmatic (at least until recently) image.
If Get Ready was the rocking, re-invigorated sound of a phoenix rising from the ashes, Waiting is the sound of the band discovering if they can re-visit their sonic legacy without repeating themselves. For the most part they don't, though first single Krafty, with it's chiming Regret-style guitar, Atmosphere-ic keyboard fills and endearingly terrible lyrics, is a total retread (not, I must admit, that I really mind: no can do New Order like New Order). Indeed, it's the often bad lyrics that prevents this record from earning a fifth star, especially the first couple of songs whose lyrics are pretty much interchangeable and don't really enhance the music.
When things gel, however, look out: gorgeous, melodic, and filled with elegiac longing, the title track is a winner, and instant-turn-it-up-classic Turn is anthemic and more satisfying than anything on Get Ready.
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By A Customer on 29 Mar. 2005
Format: Audio CD
An awesome return to form. Although Republic and Get Ready were not bad albums- this is the one we've all been waiting for. Barney has certainly come into his own with excellent back up from Hooky and Steve. Vocals are probably his strongest yet and everysong a winner. Shades of Power,Corruption, Low-Life and Technique what more could you want. In light of past songs there are some instant classics here already. The title track and Turn are in the same league as True Faith, a bold claim but repeating listening lets them shine through. Above all it sounds like New Order, pop music at it's best. This lot by rights should have been bigger then U2.
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By A Customer on 28 Feb. 2005
Format: Audio CD
I'm afraid I have to somewhat disagree with some of the reviews here - although this is definitely New Order in very good form, it's still nowhere near some of their best work.
This album was alleged to me more akin to Technique, an album which I still love to this day and have no trouble listening to every track. This claim couldn't be further from the truth - it sounds more like a mix of Republic and later Electronic material. If I didn't know better I'd say Johnny Marr had something to do with half of these tracks - his influence on Mr Sumner certainly shows!
This isn't a bad thing because if it did sound like Technique it would sound extremely retro, and it's good to hear New Order moving forward with their sound (I think this album is what Get Ready should have sounded like frankly). I for one wasn't prepared for the the sound of Get Ready at the time.
Stand out tracks for me are Morning Night & Day, I told you so and Jetstream, whilst Who's Joe, Krafty, Waiting for... are all growers. Draculas Castle is in my opinion an awful track which does not sit well with the rest of the album, and the track Working Overtime does not ruin this album even though it has a surprising sound compared to the rest of the album.
In conclusion, if you're looking for thumping disco style New Order in the vein of Technique/True Faith/Blue Monday then you'll most likely be disappointed. However, if material from Republic, the better tracks on Get Ready and Electronic's later material is more your cup of tea, this is a well worth a listen.
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