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The Volga Rises in Europe Paperback – 7 Nov 2000

4.0 out of 5 stars 2 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Paperback: 282 pages
  • Publisher: Birlinn Ltd; 1st Thus edition (7 Nov. 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1841580961
  • ISBN-13: 978-1841580968
  • Product Dimensions: 19.7 x 12.7 x 2 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,653,760 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Format: Paperback
This is the first Eastern Front book that I have read, and perhaps it is not the best place to start for a military over-view, but Malaparte provides a fascinating look at an aspect of war in the Russian campaign that I suspect has precious little coverage in English. The first half of the book sees Malaparte following the front east, a few miles from the "action", encountering civilians and writing in a very detached, almost dreamlike fashion about his experiences. There are no recurring characters, there is little criticism of the German actions or policies that brought about the campaign (he does write about communism and how it has affected the civilians he meets to quite some extent), and it is an eery, poetic recount of snapshots into the life and death that he encountered on a daily basis. Half way through, and German intervention sees Malaparte "re-deploy" to the fight for Stalingrad, and we see a different situation, but still told in his thoroughly engaging style. I would not recommend this book to people who want maps, orders of battle, and discussions of tactics or grand strategies, but I would suggest that anyone interested in this campaign who wants to delve a little deeper than usual give this a read. It's quite short too, so won't take you long.
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Format: Unknown Binding
Very observant, (too) flowery writing from close behind the front line. Detailed battlefield walks and sights with AGS. He paints pictures with words of the landscape and devestation of war. Creates Suspense on sentry duty in freezing conditions on the Karillian front(anticipating a knife across his throat at any moment) and wandering the soviet graveyards. Portayals of the soviet soldiers mind, their ethos and beliefs. No propoganda here. He does however go on a bit...
He knows(in summer 1941) what happens to Jews, looters and commissars ! an interesting read
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